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  • #16
    I was trained at Bethlehem Steel on the use of all types welders. I own a Lincoln 225 amp stick welder and think its the best buy for the buck. I own a Harbor Freight Mig Welder and it works just fine, but I will state that if you use the better name brands you'l notice that they are easier to use( easier to start arc ). I'm now retired and do limited amounts of welding and don't need to weld alot so the Harbor Freigt weler is quite adaquit to use.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Sam Ensley View Post
      Lowe's has a Lincoln 220-volt, AC-225 stick welder for $289. I know nothing about welders, but think I need one. What is the difference between a flux core and gas core? Would this welder from Lowe's be a good one to get for all around work?
      Thanks,
      Sam
      A stick welder is great for heavy steel as it gives great penetration, and will easily melt through thick rust. However, a stick welder is of no use for welding thin gauge steel as it creates too much heat and will melt through and create holes. A wire-feed welder using flux-core wire uses a hollow wire filled with a hard flux (like used for coating welding rods for a stick welder) and works good for thin gauge steel, but leaves behind a flux coating on the welds and leaves behind metal spatter. A wire-feed welder using gas (MIG welding) uses solid metal wire and it works great for thin gauge steel and leaves behind a clean smooth weld.
      A 220-volt, 225 amp wire-feed welder will also weld thick steel, but are very expensive.
      sigpic
      In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

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      • #18
        All Right! Great information! You Guys ROCK! I knew I should just wait and hold out for a good one. Just getting antsy.

        I worked in the Portlans ship yards for years as a welder but that was before wire welding got so prevelant. So thank you and I will hold out.

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        • #19
          Another thing to consider is what is this welder going to be plugging into. I have a Clarke Dual Purpose 125EN Mig welder, which is a 120V welder with a gas and flux core hookup(have the conversion kit, never got around to putting it in yet, lol). I bought the setup back in 2007 from Menards here for 300 dollars. I bought the biggest welder they had that could be plugged into a wall outlet, because if I went bigger, as much as I wanted to, I would need to run a 220 line from the breaker box out to where ever I was going to use the welder. It also required me to splice in some large AC plugs, since they didn't have any preassembled plugs on the welder. I didn't want to do any of that yet, since this welder was going to be moved around to some pretty isolated spots, so I went with the biggest MIG welder that could be plugged into a wall outlet. I also figured I wasn't going to be welding ship hulls very much, mostly sheet metal and the occasional 3/16 inch turbo flange adapter, so it didn't need to be real extravagant.
          1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
          1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
          1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
          1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

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          • #20
            About 10 years ago I bought a Hobart mig 110 welder. ( this was just when Miller had bought them) Got it home and the duty cycle was about 5 seconds. I took it back and they tested it and said it was working fine. I returned it and got a refund. Went to Home Depo bought a Lincon and to this day have NEVER had to stop and wait on the Lincon. I don't know what Hobart has done since Miller bought them but my purchase of a Hobart was very disapointing. I did my entire 56, floors and body with pretty good sucess. Again not trashing Hobart it is just the one I bought left a bad impression on me.

            1956 Studebaker Pelham Wagon Houston, Texas
            Remember, \"When all is said and done. More is always said then ever done.\"

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            • #21
              I did my shopping on line becauseI went to every welding supply store and hardware store and the welders were either to big, or to much for what I needed it for, or diffenetly toosmall. Prices even at the Pawn shops were outragous.I wanted something to do sheet metal with,like my floors in my Hawk,and wanted the same Mig to weld 1/4" + Plus steel.I have never heard anything good about flux Mig welding. It is usually what the manufacturer uses to get you to buy it. I shopped for used Migs but you don't know the history onj it. And they were as much money as what I bouhgt on line new.Got a deal with a larger bottle,wheeled stand for the Mig and the bottle to sit, A new Clarke Auto-Darkening helmet, cleaing brush 1 roll of flux wire 0.30'' and one roll of 0.30'' non flux wire a nd a VCR on how to set the weler up that actually was pretty good.. My shop was wired fore 220 volts and I put in a new wall recepticle that would except the new welder plug. This limited me to about 15 feet with it.I wanted to bring it out of the shop to do weding jobs so I sprung for the connectors and 50' of the biggest wire I could afford cost me 125.00 total at home depot.Thewelder I bought for 600.00 wasa Clarke EN 180 specifcally for the 220 v very good duty cycle all the other stufflike bottle ,regulators hose,tips,cleaning brush,auto darkening helmet ,stand and bottle.It was in the midwest and cost me around 120.00 to ship to the northwest coast. Good luck Mike P.S. Eastwood car restoration equipment just stated selling its own Mig welder, its set up for sheetmetal and heavier meal.You can bring it up on there web site and see if it will fill your bill..
              Last edited by hawk58man; 03-06-2011, 07:05 PM.

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