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  • Engine Parts ID

    I just picked up a 1959 4 door Lark VII that at some point had a 63 V8 swaped into it. By the block is indicates it's a 259. and I'm okay with that, but there are some parts on the engine that I question. The engine has 2 pullies on the crank and water pump but was not running an extra belt because there were no other accessories to need it but the pullies themselves are not like I have seen before. The ones on the crank are cast iron and have been drilled, loking like it was done for balance, same with water pump ones. Has any one seen this before. There is also a gap between the pullies which I have not seen before. The only ones I have seen in the past basicaly but up against each other. When I get into the tear down I will post more findings. Also, how many water pump manifolds are there and what are the differences? I will post pics if needed.

    Thanks, Len.

  • #2
    Len, chances are pretty good the engine had an aftermarket air conditioning compressor on it at one time; the car it came from having been fitted with non-Studebaker air conditioning at some point. That was so common in the 1960s, especially in a hot (temperature-wise) market like much of California.

    Look for other signs of bracketry and such on the engine.

    There are really only three non-Avanti water pump manifolds:

    1. 1951-1960, 4-bolt thermostat housing.

    2. 1961-1964, 2-bolt thermostat housing.

    3. 1963 and 1964 R-2 water pump manifold with a cast, machined pad on top for the supercharger mounting bracket. Still a 2-bolt thermostat housing, but offset to the left (driver side) of the engine.

    The first two housings may have been drilled and tapped for a heater hose connection on the left side of the engine, instead of the normal tap and heater hose pipe on the right side of the engine. Most air conditioning compressor installations required this, including Studebaker's own "factory air." The housing is the same, but machined differently. BP
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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    • #3
      Mine was a bit different...

      1. 59, 2dr. wagon
      2. Air conditioned (the interior unit had a Stude "S" that looked sorta factory as I recall) Cast iron pulleys (balanced and seperated), no extra holes
      3. Two bolt thermostat housing
      4. No water in/outlet on the left side (no boss either) of the water manifold
      5. Nice clean holes in the firewall (unlike an outside shop's normal work..!)
      6. Didn't work, kinda ugly under the hood and kinda ugly under the dash...one of the first things removed and sold...

      Mike

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      • #4
        Originally posted by BobPalma View Post
        Len, chances are pretty good the engine had an aftermarket air conditioning compressor on it at one time; the car it came from having been fitted with non-Studebaker air conditioning at some point. That was so common in the 1960s, especially in a hot (temperature-wise) market like much of California.

        Look for other signs of bracketry and such on the engine.

        There are really only three non-Avanti water pump manifolds:

        1. 1951-1960, 4-bolt thermostat housing.

        2. 1961-1964, 2-bolt thermostat housing.

        3. 1963 and 1964 R-2 water pump manifold with a cast, machined pad on top for the supercharger mounting bracket. Still a 2-bolt thermostat housing, but offset to the left (driver side) of the engine.

        The first two housings may have been drilled and tapped for a heater hose connection on the left side of the engine, instead of the normal tap and heater hose pipe on the right side of the engine. Most air conditioning compressor installations required this, including Studebaker's own "factory air." The housing is the same, but machined differently. BP
        Bob, I think there were two four bolt thermostat housings, one for 51-54 with the top mounted fuel pump, and the later 55-60 one with clearance for the timing gear fuel pump.
        JDP Maryland

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        • #5
          First one is of the manifold, second and third of the pulleys.

          I did not find any mounting brackets, or signs of anything that would have been on there since the swap many years ago. It's a full flow block with 570 heads so it's a run of the mill 259, which is what I'm looking for. I just hope I can get it running with out too much outlay.

          http://rides.webshots.com/photo/2440...hL?vhost=rides
          http://rides.webshots.com/photo/2218...kW?vhost=rides
          http://rides.webshots.com/photo/2371...LM?vhost=rides

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          • #6
            The Manifold looks like an ordinary '61-'64 unit, but with a pile of household plumbing fittings hanging on it to clear an A/C pump.

            The Heater shutoff is on the wrong opening, that's the RETURN!

            The Engine Outlet Heater opening is plugged, so you will find a aftermarket A/C supplied fitting at the rear of the Right Cylinder Head for the Engine Out to the Heater.

            The INSIDE looks rusted beyond saving though.
            Last edited by StudeRich; 03-02-2011, 04:00 PM.
            StudeRich
            Second Generation Stude Driver,
            Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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