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  • Electrical Problem

    Well thanks to help from this forum, I have been able to completely replace my brake system, I replaced the fuel pump, rebuilt the carb., and new points and plugs. The engine now runs fine. I decided to remove and clean the fuel tank.
    I took the tank to a radiator shop for cleaning. I then coated the fuel tank inside and painted it outside. Replaced the fuel line and got ready to put the tank back. I knew the fuel gauge did not work so I tried to fix it. No luck. Time to ask for help again.

    When I ground the line that goes to the sending unit nothing happens. The gauge sets at one quarter tank where it has always set.
    I was getting ready to pull the gauge when I decided to try the instrument lights first. No instrument lights. Also no headlights or tail lights. Now I am wondering if there is any power to the panel.
    I cannot find a fuse box or any kind of a circuit breaker. Is there one?

    I replaced the battery, When I did , I noticed a red wire (fairly heavy) hanging behind the negative side of the battery tray. Should this "red" wire be hooked to the negative side of the battery? I tested it for power and there is none on it.

    The AMP meter works, the fuel gauge does not work, the temperature gauge does not work and no lights except for turn signals. Could all of these problems be related. Whoops, I have a 1957 silver hawk (originally a 6 now a V-8). Thanks for any help.
    Last edited by aftontrix; 02-27-2011, 11:11 AM.

  • #2
    really need to know what car you're talking about to answer your questions in a specific manner... answers may vary depending on year/model.

    nate
    --
    55 Commander Starlight
    http://members.cox.net/njnagel

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    • #3
      What year and model vehicle is this?

      For future reference, as a general rule do not ground the wire going to the sending unit to test a fuel gauge. This can damage the gauge by overheating the bi-metallic element element inside the gauge and then the gauge will be out of calibration and not accurate anymore. Even with a full tank, there is still some resistance at the sending unit on a 12 Volt system.

      Hawks and C/K models have fiberglass dashes and the ground return is through the speedometer cable jacket for the gauges. Better to make a ground lead for the gauge housings.

      No red wires should go to the negative terminal in a 12 Volt car but it would help to know what kind of Studebaker this is.

      It sounds like the feed wire to the gauges isn't connected. I think that goes from the fuse block, but it sounds like the wire upstream of the fuse block may be disconnected . Some checks with a wiring diagram and a multimeter should reveal what's wrong.

      Comment


      • #4
        '58 Sedan/Hardtop V-8?

        It would depend on what that Red wire goes to. Tracing and testing it would be good. It depends on how long the breakout section from the Main Harness is, as to where it should go. Is it Lugged for a stud?
        Have a female bullet connector like for the stop light switch?
        Does it come out of the main harness or go into the Steering Gear?

        Just a few possiblitites and suggestions, hard without SEEING it.

        ----"Also, there should be two Black wires connected to the Batt. side of the Solenoid going into the Harness." ------Stikeout!-------------------There is no strikeout function here, but this would only be IF you had a '58 Sedan/Hardtop/Wagon.

        '57 Hawks have one RED heavy gauge wire!

        Did you check this '58 Wiring Diagram for possibilities?


        https://www.studebakerparts.com/stud...8-sed-wire.jpg

        NOT applicable to '57 Hawk.
        Last edited by StudeRich; 02-27-2011, 11:37 AM.
        StudeRich
        Second Generation Stude Driver,
        Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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        • #5
          Geoff, I hate to hear I should not have grounded the sender wire. I read that was what I should do in the shop manual. It is a 57 silver hawk. Where is the fuse block. I have not found it. thanks

          Comment


          • #6
            studerich,
            The red wire is about a foot long and comes out of the firewall. It has a "round" connector on the end of it like maybe lugged for a stud (about a quarter inch hole in it). There are a couple of wires in sheathing going to the positive side of the battery not sure about the solenoid. I will check that. Thanks.

            Comment


            • #7
              There is no actual "Fuse Block". On the left side under the dash there is an insulator board (small) with two fuses: the Dome Light & Stop Light Fuse and the Turn Signal Fuse and the Flasher unit. That's as close as it gets. The headlights have their own Circuit Breaker sometimes separate but on most Hawks part of the Hd. Lt. Sw. Other important power feeds have in-line fuses.

              This is the reason we have been recommending here forever that owners install a Fuse or fusible link in the main power wire from the Solenoid. As in another post yesterday.
              StudeRich
              Second Generation Stude Driver,
              Proud '54 Starliner Owner

              Comment


              • #8
                Ok then , it's a '57 Silver Hawk, this '57 GH Diagram will work then:

                https://www.studebakerparts.com/stud.../57GH-wire.jpg

                Quote aftontrix: "studerich,
                The red wire is about a foot long and comes out of the firewall. It has a "round" connector on the end of it like maybe lugged for a stud (about a quarter inch hole in it). There are a couple of wires in sheathing going to the positive side of the battery not sure about the solenoid. I will check that. Thanks."


                This sure does sound familiar, didn't we discuss these wires to Pos. Batt. Clamp a long time ago?

                We told you or someone that there are NEVER wires on the Battery Post Clamps. The Pos. Batt. Cable should go to the little Round Solenoid next to the Batt. where the power also connects to power up the Ammeter which in turn powers up the Ignition switch which powers up the whole dash and Car!
                Last edited by StudeRich; 02-27-2011, 11:28 AM.
                StudeRich
                Second Generation Stude Driver,
                Proud '54 Starliner Owner

                Comment


                • #9
                  Without knowing the type of car I had to use the generic term "fuse block," but that's what it's called on the diagram referenced above as well. The thing with the turn signal flasher and (I think) two fuses. But it sounds like you are missing the + feed for the turn signals and the gauges and instrument lamps altogether.

                  If the gauge didn't move when you grounded the sending unit wire, you didn't hurt anything. There's apparently no power to the + side of the gauges anyway at this point. I can't tell you how long you would have to ground the sending unit wire before the gauge would be injured, but it's generally not a good idea to do that on S-W gauges as in Hawks. Stewart Warner had a bulletin on that ages ago but I have lost it. I have a gauge test unit which is just a box with a rheostat inside and the knob scale is marked Full-1/2-Empty. I think the Full setting still has about 8-10 Ohms of resistance. It substitutes for the sending unit to test the gauge. When I have loaned it out or can't find it, I used a 20 Ohm resistor instead. This is just to test whether the gauge will then indicate, not to test a specific reading.
                  Last edited by Geoff Fors; 02-27-2011, 12:59 PM.

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