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electric cooling fan

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  • electric cooling fan

    Has anyone out there added an electric fan to their Studebaker? In Las Vegas, with summer approaching, I am considering adding one for additional protection.

    Do you add one in front of the radiator while keeping the engine-driven one, or have you substituted an electric for a mechanical one?

    Any other cooling system suggestions appreciated.

    Las Vegas, NV
    '51 Champion Business Coupe G899965 10G-Q4-1434

  • #2
    With a clean cooling system (including the block and the radiator), a stock engine driven fan should be able to keep up even with Las Vegas heat.

    A stock engine driven fan will out CFM an electric fan except at idle.

    If you add an electric fan, pulling the air through (mounting on the engine side of the radiator) is more effective than pushing the air through.

    If you have a clean cooling system, good radiator and water pump and are still experiencing problems, try water only in the radiator (well, with some water pump lube and anti corrosion additives). Plain water transfers heat better than a water/antifreeze mix. For even better heat transfer, try one of the "water wetter" products...they usually come with the above additives also.



    Dick Steinkamp
    Bellingham, WA

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    • #3
      you could keep the OEM fan and add a pusher on the outside. Put a on/off switch in the dash area and turn on when needed and this would also be a way to see if it helps. Good luck.

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      • #4
        I haven't had any problems... I'm just trying to anticipate any. Thanks for the info.

        Las Vegas, NV
        '51 Champion Business Coupe G899965 10G-Q4-1434

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        • #5
          The disadvantage of engine driven fans is that they move the least amount of air when they need the action of the fan the most (idle speed, start and stop traffic, etc). Once up to highway speed, they use more power and make more noise but it's not really needed since you have a 60 mph wind blowing through the radiator anyway. A flexible fan is somewhat better when it comes to reducing horsepower loss and viscious fan is much better. I believe I once read that the average conventional fan soaks up 5-7 hp at highway speeds depending upon the fan size, number of blades, engine speed and so on. The nice thing about an electric fan is that it's only going to run when the radiator water reaches a certain temperature and the amount of air moved isn't dependent upon engine speed but rather on need. Tranverse mounted engines forced manufactures rethink powering the fan which was something needed long ago.

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          • #6
            Ok, I know someone is going to mention that an electric fan doesn't run for free since electricity must be generated to run one. I've checked several electric fans and they'll use somewhere around 5-7 amps depending upon their diameter. An alternator will require somewhere around 1 to 1.4 hp to generate that much current...but that's only when the fan's running.

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            • #7
              Greetings, All,

              We should all be wary of generalizations, including this one. However, the following are not always true:

              1. A stock engine driven fan will out CFM an electric fan except at idle. I use an OEM Dodge Viper two-speed electric fan which I guarantee to move more CFM than any four-blade Studebaker fan.

              2. it's not really needed since you have a 60 mph wind blowing through the radiator I have noticed my 1955 Studebaker V8 pickup will run 15-20 degrees higher temperature at 60 MPH on a hot day with the engine-driven fan removed than with it in place. My hypothesis is the fan creates a vacuum behind the radiator which helps the forward motion move more air than it would without the fan.

              thnx, jv.

              PackardV8
              PackardV8

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              • #8
                quote:Originally posted by PackardV8

                Greetings, All,

                We should all be wary of generalizations, including this one. However, the following are not always true:

                1. A stock engine driven fan will out CFM an electric fan except at idle. I use an OEM Dodge Viper two-speed electric fan which I guarantee to move more CFM than any four-blade Studebaker fan.
                I guess I was just wandering around in the aftermarket parts aisle . No contest, obviously between a Viper fan and a stock Stude fan. My bad.

                I'll also admit I'm stuck in the 60's. Somehow cars got by without electric fans then. Whenever I see one on an otherwise period correct stocker or street rod, I cringe...sort of like seeing an alternator on a flathead V8 .


                Dick Steinkamp
                Bellingham, WA

                Comment


                • #9
                  So far I've been impressed with how well the stock fan has cooled my Hawk on the warmest days during rush hour. That said, I did a hopped up flathead V/8 in a 41 F**d BS (before Studebaker) and installed a Cooling Components shrouded puller fan instead of the engine fan. The flatties run notoriously hot but that one could sit all day in traffic without going over 190 degrees. It was thermostatically controlled with a manual override switch beneath the dash.

                  Oh, yeah... I had a spiffy chrome 100 amp alternator on it, too, Dick!

                  BShaw,Webmaster

                  60 Hawk. 49 2R5, 39 Champion
                  Woodbury, Minnesota
                  sigpic
                  Bob Shaw
                  Rush City, Minnesota
                  1960 Hawk - www.northstarstudebakers.com
                  "The farther I go, the behinder I get."

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                  • #10
                    My car is not exactly a period correct stocker, but on the other hand I'm not anxious to modify it just for the sake of modifying it. Las Vegas summers are hot and traffic can be bad, with long idling periods. I haven't had any cooling troubles yet, but I just thought it could be a proactive way of avoiding problems, since overheating can lead to so many other potential problems. I appreciate all the comments.

                    Las Vegas, NV
                    '51 Champion Business Coupe G899965 10G-Q4-1434

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      quote:Originally posted by BShaw

                      Oh, yeah... I had a spiffy chrome 100 amp alternator on it, too, Dick!

                      [V]





                      Dick Steinkamp
                      Bellingham, WA

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        quote:Originally posted by vegas paul

                        Las Vegas summers are hot and traffic can be bad, with long idling periods.
                        Oh, come on! It's a dry heat.

                        ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                        Tom - Valrico, FL

                        1964 Studebaker Daytona

                        Tom - Bradenton, FL

                        1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
                        1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

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                        • #13
                          "Cooling Components" brand is the way to go. Buy the whole package...fan, shroud, thermo auto switch, manual override switch. I also added an aluminum radiator with distilled water and a touch of afreeze. No more overheating. Borrow some magazines from a Good Guys or National Street Rod Association member which address the cooling/overheating situation. Street rods run hot too........................Brad

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                          • #14
                            It's a dry heat....try telling that to the Thanksgiving turkey setting in a 350 degree oven. I doubt those words of encouragement will make him any more comfortable!

                            jv, concerning the increased water temperature you've noticed, I wonder if it's because they needed to have a mini helicopter running behind the radiator? Not that the fan was such a marvelous, effecient invention, but maybe because the thick engine block and smallish brass radiators didn't shed heat as well as today's thinner blocks and aluminum radiators? The average Stude radiator looks pretty puny compared to the kitchen table sized ones found on air conditioned, 400ci, late 60's cars.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Having driven Studebakers in any condition, hot or very hot (100 f. +) I've yet to have an overheating problem when the vehicle's cooling system was maintained as often as required. I run 180 degree thermostat and 50/50 coolant mix and don't ever worry about the temp. PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE PAYS OFF.

                              Brian

                              Brian K. Curtis

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