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  • PackardV8
    replied
    Your '63 should have been OEM with the later spindles.

    jack vines

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  • Warren Webb
    replied
    This is the first I've heard of a early & late spindle. When did the "late" spindle come? I have had a pair of the quick arms for a few years now intending to put them on my 63 Hawk, but if that still has the early spindles, I guess it will have to wait.

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  • sbca96
    replied
    Originally posted by Mike Van Veghten View Post
    Most cars today drive around with much more (+) caster thAn is possible with the Stude suspension,
    Mike
    SomedAy you will grOw up, thAn thIngs will gEt bEtter around hEre.


    Tom

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  • leyrret
    replied
    I've used floor tile, galvanized tin, or anything smooth with heavy gear oil. Makes a mess though. I mark the angles on the floor but time consuming to get them right. I use a bubble gauge. .

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  • mrobertweiss
    replied
    I used the pie pans. They move a little relative to floor and themselves, and are not very accurate. It's difficult to get one pan to slide on the other, even with grease, cook oil, etc. A difference of 2 degrees error throws a significant error into the caster calculation with the digital gauges.

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  • r1lark
    replied
    Originally posted by mrobertweiss View Post
    The biggest issue with using the alignment tool was getting the 15 degrees right/left wheel-turning accurately done. So I just got tired of screwing around with it... I may need to pick up some turntables, because scribing the 15 degrees was a real nuisance.
    Manuel,

    I used four cheap pizza tins for turntables. Cut the rolled edges off, and put two under each wheel with some grease between the two tins. Not as snazzy as store-bought turntables, but worked for me. Figure out what 15 degees is on the circumference of the tins and mark them to get the wheels turned accurately.

    Got this tip from Jeff Rice...........

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  • Mike Van Veghten
    replied
    Robert -

    It's not at all "what's allowed", it's more like...how much will the Stude system take..!
    Most cars today drive around with much more (+) caster thAn is possible with the Stude suspension, because of the Stude shaft design.

    You can force more, but then you bind up (metal to metal) the up and down motion of the spindle at the cross shafts.
    Go lightly when adjusting, but get as much as you can get...

    Mike

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  • mrobertweiss
    replied
    When a 1/4 allen wrench is inserted into the caster/camber adjustment, does rotation in a clockwise manner, standing behind the right wheel, move the caster positive or negative? I put all new kingpins, bushings, etc in last yr, and I cannot remember the fine details, but I think the threads were right handed on each side of the pin, which, just considering it, should make clockwise rotation from behind, reduce the right wheel caster, if correct. I just got through using a Longacre digital alignment device to align the front end of this 53 project car. I left the caster at -2.0 when I was through, since it was in specs. The car has a 57 Ross steering box, and a 62 lark power steering setup, with short steering arms. The biggest issue with using the alignment tool was getting the 15 degrees right/left wheel-turning accurately done. So I just got tired of screwing around with it... I may need to pick up some turntables, because scribing the 15 degrees was a real nuisance. I wanted the alignment to be close to decent, because I have not yet really road-tested this car, which has a nominal 400 HP, if I did everything else on the build without too many stupid mistakes. Thanks, m weiss

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  • leyrret
    replied
    With positive caster the weight of the car has a tendency to hold the wheels straight making car harder to steer. Negative tends to do the opposite which will result in quicker reaction to steering wheel movement. Any change to steering wheel ratio by R&P, steering box , steering arms, Pittman
    arms,etc. can result in too quick of reaction and resulting darting effect especially with loose steering. Short steering arms without power steering
    will give heavy steering in the parking lot which will get increasingly worse the more positive you go. Power Steering will make it easier to steer but
    may increase the darting effect with out positive caster.

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  • PackardV8
    replied
    On the first generation king pins, for instance, my '59 Shop Manual says -1 to -2.5 degrees. There is not usually enough rearward adjustment at the top to get these early kingpins even to come back to zero. If you can get any positive at all, so much the better, but usually won't happen.

    On the second generation king pins, my Avanti Shop Manual says -3/4 to +3/4 with 0 preferred. Sometimes it will go all the way to +1, but not always.

    Bottom Line - quick steering arms increase the tendency to wander and dart at high speeds. Positive caster or the least negative caster helps reduce this action.

    jack vines
    Last edited by PackardV8; 01-24-2011, 03:44 PM.

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  • mrobertweiss
    replied
    Jack Vines: what is the maximum caster allowed? By this do you mean more than the shop manual suggests, or above zero? thanks

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  • Mike Van Veghten
    replied
    31 Street -

    No....not EVERYONE is a CheapAssStudebakerOwner. Some of us have spent lots'a money and countless hours playing with these things...!

    I may install a pair on my 54 wagon, and I "will" install a set to my 55 wagon when I get it back on the road. But as Jack notes, I need to find a good set of later spindles.

    Mike

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  • 31Streetrod
    replied
    I stand by my original statement "that the only adjustment that is absolutely necessary after changing steering arms is re-setting the toe-in". If after driving the car you find that it wanders or darts too much, then have the caster set to max. Why spend $$$ if not needed. Remember, we're CASOs.
    Last edited by 31Streetrod; 01-24-2011, 09:43 AM.

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  • ROADRACELARK
    replied
    What Jack says. Those steering arms are on the car pictured below (NO P/S) and you wouldn't believe the difference on the track!!! No comparison to the stock ones. Almost makes it feel like a go kart....turn the wheel 90 degrees and the car turns 90 degrees!!! Forget parallel parking. Jack, you're working your magic on a friend of mines (Mike F.) 352. Saw him yesterday...he's excited. I'm sure it'll be a screamer.

    Dan Miller
    Auburn, GA

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  • PackardV8
    replied
    With the quick steering arms, it is important to set the caster to the maximum the adjustment will allow. Max caster improves the self-centering geometry and reduces darting and wandering at higher speeds.

    With the early kingpins, it is difficult to get even to zero on some cars. Personally, with quick steering arms, I always go to the late kingpin design.

    jack vines

    jack vines

    Leave a comment:

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