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1963 golden hawk rear brake drums

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  • 52 Ragtop
    replied
    Make sure you check the steel brake lines for rust too! I don't think Studebaker EVER figured on any of these cars being around this long!

    Jim

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  • JDP
    replied
    You may need to add a once or two of NEATS FOOT OIL to the booster to lube up the leather seal.

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  • stevee
    replied
    OK, update.

    we got the brake shoes, wheel cylinders, used hub/drums installed today, bled them, but the master cylinder is very weak, hardly enough to bleed the brakes.
    The saga continues, but I think we will have it running maybe next weekend.

    The brake set up on this 63 hawk sure is different than what I have seen. The master cylinder is under the drivers seat, there is a fill/reserve tank on the firewall, and there is a power brake booster under the hood near the left front fender. Sure spreads stuff out!

    Also, the power assist unit makes a noise like a small pig grunt when you pump the brakes while the motor is running. Does that mean the diaphram in the power assist is shot too? ( I assume there is a diaphram in there)

    We will keep on fixing this thing up one part at a time.

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  • TX Rebel
    replied
    Steve, I have new & used rear drums for the SuperHawk, but could not get you to answer your phone!

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  • leyrret
    replied
    The drum and hub assemblies are listed as available from SI if you can afford the price.

    Terry

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  • 64V-K7
    replied
    The outer edge of the inside of the drum has a bevel where the shoes do the work . This is usually the guide to service life.... if no bevel, toss them..

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  • N8N
    replied
    there was a thread on this recently... I believe the answer was .060" I am not sure as all my books are in storage and I can't look anything up at the moment.

    I wonder if 11" front drums could be installed on your hubs in a pinch? anyone ever try this? or are the rears narrower? I neglected to capture the width of the shoes when I put together my interchange.

    nate

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  • stevee
    replied
    Nate
    I have a studebaker junkyard nearby.
    Do you know how much these can be turned before they are considered out of spec? If the junkyard hubs have been turned too much, I sure don't want to buy them.
    thanks,

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  • N8N
    replied
    Forgot to add, make sure you get 11" drums not 10" when shopping for new ones! They actually come in 9" (for 6-cyl cars) 10" (most V-8 cars) and 11" (cars w/ front discs)

    the 11" are the least common out of all of them...

    nate

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  • N8N
    replied
    make sure that he knows that primer is NOT waterproof! I'd rather see it spotted with cheap red Krylon that doesn't really match than primer.

    nate

    (sorry, pet peeve)

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  • stevee
    replied
    Apparently the paint faded terribly when it was in Idaho, so some surface rust started. The current owner quickly sanded and primed with red primer, so it mostly looks like red primer / really faded red.

    I was pleasantly surprised at how good the floorboards were. I need to get him to keep this in a garage, not out in the driveway. Wish me luck.

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  • BobPalma
    replied
    Cool beans, Steve. That's great news. We'd all like to see a picture or two if one of you guys knows how to post. It is still the dusty Super Red color? BP

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  • stevee
    replied
    Great advice guys. y'alls analysis was spot on. The left rear had been"modified" with new lugs fit into the old hub, and the old drum slid on and off easily. Too easily actually, the lug holes in the drum showed wear in an oblong fashion from acceleration. The drum is likely toast. I will be hunting up another with hub and drum still mated together as one piece.

    The right side hub and drum came off as one piece. It looks good except 2 lugs need to be replaced. I need to find a guy around here that sill knows how (and has the tools) to swage (sp?) them back in.

    I agree with the comment about the shop manual, body parts and chassis parts manuals. I finished a 1950 champion body off restoration last july, and the manuals are all great, working together.

    The weird part is that it is not my car, but I really want to help this guy get this one back on the road.

    OH, great news, the motor numbers match, so it really is a package car, still with the original R2 in it. He fired it up today and it sounds strong.

    I will keep you posted. I can't wait to take it for a ride. Next time I will try to include a picture.

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  • N8N
    replied
    Have a look here

    http://www.studebaker-info.org/64v2488/Axle/ax.HTML

    pics are of a rear drum used with the factory front discs, what you should have

    unfortunately I can't find a good pictorial quickly of the "normal" Stude brakes and all my own pics are on another computer which I haven't fired up in months, but hopefully the above link will help you

    Bob's site has a lot of excellent info, also refer to either Bob's site or my own site for replacement parts (wheel cylinders, kits, hardware) you can buy at your FLAPS. If you need shoes they are likely vendor-only, as are the 11" front brake shoes for regular V-8 cars.

    One thing nobody's asked yet is why you are trying to pull the drums? Just to inspect things (nothing wrong with that and a good idea!) or is there a problem?

    Edit: if you only buy one book - but if your friend is keeping this car he should really have all three - IMHO you should get the chassis parts book, for all the exploded diagrams and part number listings. For a job like a brake job, I find that more helpful than the shop manual, because the shop manual assumes that everything is currently properly assembled, while these cars are now close to 50 years old at a minimum and that's not always a safe assumption to make!

    good luck

    nate
    Last edited by N8N; 01-16-2011, 05:32 AM.

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  • StudeRich
    replied
    Originally posted by stevee View Post
    Nate does your comment about the rear drums being different than the ones used on all other 55-64 studes mean that this one has self adjusters or not? thanks for all your help.
    I am not Nate, but I can tell you that the difference is WAY more than self adjusting or not! The rear drum brakes on Disc. Brake Studes. are a Wagner/Lockheed design and are of the non-self energizing type used on Trucks with the eccentric adjusters on each shoe.

    These are deliberately made not to assist in applying the pressure after the shoes touch the drum like just about all other "Bendix type" drum brakes out there.
    This is done for good reason, there were no equilizer valves in 1961-62 when these were developed or were not used, so normal drum brakes would lockup with the higher Power Disc. Brake line pressure required to apply the front Discs.

    One other thing different about them is the short lining shoe DOES NOT go forward like most others, the longest lining shoe goes forward!

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