Announcement

Collapse

Get more Tips, Specs and Technical Data!

Did you know... this Forum is a service of the Studebaker Drivers Club? For more technical tips, specifications, history and tech data, visit the Tech Tips page at the SDC Homepage: www.studebakerdriversclub.com/tips.asp
See more
See less

Valve Lifter Noise

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Valve Lifter Noise

    I've got my '61 Lark VIII Cruiser in the shop for a bit of cosmetic work, and the guy at the shop is concerned with the ticking noise of at least one of the valve lifters. This is most noticeable with the engine idling, and disappears with increased "load" on the engine, or at higher speeds. I've noticed this since I took possession of the car on Good Friday. I mentioned it on the "General Discussion" part of the forum, and the consensus was that this is a normal Studebaker engine noise. I'm running Shell Rotella 15W-40 oil in this car, as was suggested, by the way, and had a complete oil and filter change two weeks ago. The guy at the shop is just really worried about the ticking of the lifter, and suggests that I need to replace the entire cam before I wind up with some real problems. I'm a bit paranoid about it myself, having had to replace the engine in my Toyota daily driver a few years ago after the build-up of oil sludge that was not draining out of the pan with oil changes caused insufficient oil to reach the valves. The only warning I got prior to that was this same ticking noise, which sorta made my gasoline engine sound like a diesel, and that is how the engine sounds on the Lark. However, unlike the Lark, the Toyota's noise got worse with increased speed/engine load.

    So, should I try to find a new cam with lifters and replace the whole thing, or is this indeed normal for Studebaker engines? Is there an additive that can stop this and prevent any future problems?

    pitbulllady


  • #2
    Adjust the valve clearances before you worry about it. It may or may not be a problem at all, and I'm betting on "not" unless you are having other symptoms (low oil pressure, etc.)

    Most vehicles on the road today have hydrailuc lifters, and a ticking noise on one of those vehicles can be a sign of bad problems. A solid lifter cam will always tick at least faintly unless the valves are adjusted too tight.

    An exhaust leak at the manifold can also sound like a valve tick, but that will generally get louder with throttle opening. Also not a real cause for concern, although it should be fixed.

    nate

    --
    55 Commander Starlight
    http://members.cox.net/njnagel
    --
    55 Commander Starlight
    http://members.cox.net/njnagel

    Comment


    • #3
      You will probably get a lot of feedback on this subject, but let's keep it basic for starters..
      On a Stude V8 engine.....
      Stude used a solid, flat tappet lifter and matching camshaft.
      They are louder and more noticeable to the non-Stude technician.
      They need periodic adjustment, and the adjustment needs to be done with a sort of finesse` gained from sloppy repetitive practice.
      Too loose and you'll hear a clatter, which is common. Too tight and you may hurt something.
      I would not panic and start ordering any parts until you have 'run the valves' on this engine.
      Sure, it's possible you wiped a lobe on the cam, but that is actually a pretty rare thing on a Studebaker engine.
      You would notice this problem when you 'ran the valves', because one would not be working properly.
      A compression check of each cylinder would show you which cylinder was in trouble, but I would remain skeptical and optimistic that it is just an adjustment that is needed.
      Besides... The guy is shopping for work, and you are there...
      Put your game face on and tell him that Studes are tough![}]
      Jeff[8D]


      quote:Originally posted by pitbulllady

      I've got my '61 Lark VIII Cruiser in the shop for a bit of cosmetic work, and the guy at the shop is concerned with the ticking noise of at least one of the valve lifters. This is most noticeable with the engine idling, and disappears with increased "load" on the engine, or at higher speeds. I've noticed this since I took possession of the car on Good Friday. I mentioned it on the "General Discussion" part of the forum, and the consensus was that this is a normal Studebaker engine noise. I'm running Shell Rotella 15W-40 oil in this car, as was suggested, by the way, and had a complete oil and filter change two weeks ago. The guy at the shop is just really worried about the ticking of the lifter, and suggests that I need to replace the entire cam before I wind up with some real problems. I'm a bit paranoid about it myself, having had to replace the engine in my Toyota daily driver a few years ago after the build-up of oil sludge that was not draining out of the pan with oil changes caused insufficient oil to reach the valves. The only warning I got prior to that was this same ticking noise, which sorta made my gasoline engine sound like a diesel, and that is how the engine sounds on the Lark. However, unlike the Lark, the Toyota's noise got worse with increased speed/engine load.

      So, should I try to find a new cam with lifters and replace the whole thing, or is this indeed normal for Studebaker engines? Is there an additive that can stop this and prevent any future problems?

      pitbulllady



      DEEPNHOCK at Gmail.com
      Brooklet, Georgia
      '37 Coupe Express (never ending project)
      '37 Coupe Express Trailer (project)
      '61 Hawk (project)
      http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock

      HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

      Jeff


      Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



      Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

      Comment


      • #4
        Many years ago an old Volkswagen mechanic once told me about the same noise on my Volkswagen "If you can hear it--it's working".Leave it alone or if the noise bothers you.............
        Pull the valve covers and set the tappet clearances to factory specs, If your mechanic cant do this find another mechanic.

        Peter Sant
        KOOL R2

        Comment


        • #5
          Yes, I'd probably be more concerned if I couldn't here anything at all. Sure, you don't want it to sound like a diesel, but too tight is bad. I wouldn't start worrying about any serious stuff at this point and you'll sleep better. If it gets noticably worse in short order or the sound frightens dogs and small children, then worry about.

          Comment


          • #6
            IF it's as you describe - don't worry about it.

            Miscreant adrift in
            the BerStuda Triangle


            1957 Transtar 1/2ton
            1960 Larkvertible V8
            1958 Provincial wagon
            1953 Commander coupe

            No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

            Comment


            • #7
              Also possible it could be the fuel pump.

              Ted

              Comment


              • #8

                Nope, the sound is DEFINATELY coming from underneath a valve cover, though like I said, it's not like this really loud and annoying noise, and it's nowhere near as loud or obvious as the "dieseling" sound that my Toyota's valves made before its first engine croaked. Once you apply the gas a bit, you can't hear it at all. The guy who changed the oil for me at the full-service gas station(how many of THOSE are still around?)told me that he thought it was normal for this type of engine to have that noise, and suggested running some STP Oil Treatment through if it bothered me that much, but this other guy(who claims to know a lot about old cars)was really freaked about it and was certain that I already had some major damage in those valves, but I do believe he's trying to get more money.

                pitbulllady

                quote:Originally posted by Chicken Hawk

                Also possible it could be the fuel pump.

                Ted

                Comment


                • #9
                  Any GOOD old school mechanic would assure you that if you can hear 'em just a bit, you're in good shape!

                  Miscreant adrift in
                  the BerStuda Triangle


                  1957 Transtar 1/2ton
                  1960 Larkvertible V8
                  1958 Provincial wagon
                  1953 Commander coupe

                  No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Ok, which ever valve cover the noise is under, take that cover off and using a .024" feeler guage (or any piece of flat metal this size within a few thousandths) and start sticking it under each rocker until the noise stops. This would be the one making the noise then take a half inch open end wrench and turn the adjusting nut clockwise until the guage will barely slide through and this should do it unless you have a worn cam and/or lifter (assuming this is where the noise is coming from rather than a piston slap, pin, etc.)

                    Hint: Slow the idle down as low as you can without the engine dying when doing this. Will throw and lose less oil.

                    Ted

                    quote:Originally posted by pitbulllady


                    Nope, the sound is DEFINATELY coming from underneath a valve cover, though like I said, it's not like this really loud and annoying noise, and it's nowhere near as loud or obvious as the "dieseling" sound that my Toyota's valves made before its first engine croaked. Once you apply the gas a bit, you can't hear it at all. The guy who changed the oil for me at the full-service gas station(how many of THOSE are still around?)told me that he thought it was normal for this type of engine to have that noise, and suggested running some STP Oil Treatment through if it bothered me that much, but this other guy(who claims to know a lot about old cars)was really freaked about it and was certain that I already had some major damage in those valves, but I do believe he's trying to get more money.

                    pitbulllady

                    quote:Originally posted by Chicken Hawk

                    Also possible it could be the fuel pump.

                    Ted

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I would worry a lot more about the guy who is telling you that this noise is bad, than the noise. I think your instincts are correct, that he is looking for an excuse to bill you. Learn how to adjust your own valves, it's not that hard and enormously satisfying, and keep your money.

                      Tim K.
                      '64 R2 GT Hawk
                      Tim K.
                      \'64 R2 GT Hawk

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Silence in solid lifters in a warm engine would worry me more than a little chatter. If you do any adjusting, opt for a breath of chatter. If you go a hair beyond quiet, start planning your next major repair.

                        Brad Johnson
                        Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                        '33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight
                        "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                        Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                        Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                        sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          You think your Cruiser is noisy? You oughta try my '56 Parkview. ol' Bess sounds like one of my Dad's threashers. Yet, she runs strong and has lots of power. I am truely falling in love with her.


                          Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                          Lotsa Larks!
                          K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                          Ron Smith
                          Where the heck is Lewiston, CA?
                          Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                          K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                          Ron Smith
                          Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            If you can hear a valve or two clicking over the others, it probably means they didn't get set quite right the last time they were done. Sometimes one of the self-locking adjusting screws looses its friction and will back off by itself. Either way, the valve adjustment should be redone. I would be a little surprised if it needs anything more than that.


                            Dwain G.

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X