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Removing rust from the inside of an Intake Manifold.

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  • bensherb
    replied
    Exactly what Bob said. I'm still using the same gallon I've been using for two years, and I do use it regularly. Like Bob said, as time and use goes on its effectiveness slows when it stops working, it's done with. If you just want to clean up/strip a few handfuls of bolts, get some "The Works" toilet bowl cleaner. Two quarts is around $2.50 at Walmart. It's already 15-16% HCL but with wintergreen oil, so it smells better.

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  • sweetolbob
    replied
    Originally posted by DEEPNHOCK View Post

    That looks really good.
    How long does the acid last?
    One time use only? Can you store it and re-use it?
    How is the disposal handled?
    It works by reacting with the rust to form soluble Ferric/Ferrous salts so how long it lasts depends on the amount of rust removed and the concentration one started with. Just keep using it until it gets really slow or doesn't work.

    Disposal is the way one would get rid of any acid solution and the old saying - the solution is dilution - works here! I won't recommend nuttin on disposal but I know where mine goes after is diluted. About like pouring out Coca Cola in diluted form.

    As I said previously, the cheapest way to buy it is Muratic Acid which is about 31% HCL in Water. At this level you need to avoid the fumes and pour it into water to dilute it but as strong acids go, it's the lowest on the Oh Crap scale so just handle it with caution.
    Last edited by sweetolbob; 09-14-2020, 11:52 AM.

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  • thecramp
    replied
    Hi guys , nice result,
    in case of the intake manifold, how prevent/ avoid rust comme back inside ? how protect..?
    thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • DEEPNHOCK
    replied
    Originally posted by bensherb View Post
    I've tried vinegar with zero effect, and electrolisis with bad (destructive) results, evaporust is way to slow and expensive. My choice is HCL, hydrochloric acid, I use it to remove rust at least twice a week. It's very easy to get, (home depot or wal mart) , and cheap ( $5-$6 /gal for 30%, I cut it 1/1 with water). It removes rust great for me, and doesn't bother the parent material just the ozidation. It will also remove galvanization, cad plating and chrome (but not the nickel).
    This is a rim half from a Honda I rebuilt a couple months ago. It was too far gone to fix but I wanted to see how much good metal was actually there. I soaked it for 4 hours in 15%. Nuts n bolts, etc take just a couple minutes.

    Before: After:
    Click image for larger version

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    This is the top of a Kawisaki fuel tank, I grafted into a Harley tank. It was in the 15% HCL for about 15 minutes.
    Click image for larger version

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    That looks really good.
    How long does the acid last?
    One time use only? Can you store it and re-use it?
    How is the disposal handled?

    Leave a comment:


  • bensherb
    replied
    I've tried vinegar with zero effect, and electrolisis with bad (destructive) results, evaporust is way to slow and expensive. My choice is HCL, hydrochloric acid, I use it to remove rust at least twice a week. It's very easy to get, (home depot or wal mart) , and cheap ( $5-$6 /gal for 30%, I cut it 1/1 with water). It removes rust great for me, and doesn't bother the parent material just the ozidation. It will also remove galvanization, cad plating and chrome (but not the nickel).
    This is a rim half from a Honda I rebuilt a couple months ago. It was too far gone to fix but I wanted to see how much good metal was actually there. I soaked it for 4 hours in 15%. Nuts n bolts, etc take just a couple minutes.

    Before: After:
    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1282.JPG
Views:	229
Size:	103.0 KB
ID:	1855705Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1292.JPG
Views:	216
Size:	101.6 KB
ID:	1855706
    This is the top of a Kawisaki fuel tank, I grafted into a Harley tank. It was in the 15% HCL for about 15 minutes.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	20160816_190848.jpg
Views:	231
Size:	71.6 KB
ID:	1855707

    Leave a comment:


  • altair
    replied
    Electrolysis is my first bet but vinegar is also very effective. The vinegar should be the cleaning strength at 20% not the household 10%. You can fortify the vinegar with a bottle of lemon juice. When time is an issue for people in business yes, blasting is the media of choice, for hobbyists it doesn't matter.

    Leave a comment:


  • 53 pilgrim
    replied
    I remember using that stuff in my younger years. I was well like because I was lactose intolerant! I'm not the one who contaminated the bulk tank. I can also remember in even younger years using Coca Cola to clean rusty bike parts and chain. I use readily available locally, lemon juice= citric acid for cleaning distributors.

    Leave a comment:


  • 345 DeSoto
    replied
    "Milk Stone Remover", sold at Tractor Supply, is used on Dairy Farms to clean the inside of milk tanks. It is a 75% solution of Phosphoric acid, and I've used it for decades to remove rust from everything. It's about $13 a gallon, and removes rust better than ANY chemical I've ever used. No fuss, no muss, no bother...

    Leave a comment:


  • thecramp
    replied
    Hi guys;

    with a cast iron intake, once clean and unrust inside / outside ( watever the solution s) how will you prevent rust inside? is there a way like we do in tank..? or we let it ... and it will only be light rust in surface and is ok it's normal ..., or can we spray paint ( I think it's dangerous if it make flakes and it's sucked ... inside )
    thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • garyash
    replied
    I took a rusty manifold to my local FLAPS a few years ago. They used steel shot blasting to clean it inside and out. I was happy with the results and they didn't charge too much.

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  • Neal in NM
    replied
    Use TRECAL it is very cheap but it does take time. I have used it over the years and it is fantastic. Neal

    Leave a comment:


  • 4961Studebaker
    replied
    Originally posted by N8N View Post
    Are you thinking of Extrude-Hone?

    http://www.extrudehone.com/

    you're right, it's expensive...

    nate
    Yep, that's what I was thinking of.

    Leave a comment:


  • gordr
    replied
    Electrolysis doesn't work well, because it is a field effect. It will do exterior surfaces of a part very well, but the interior surfaces don't "see" the electric field that does the work. Electroplating is much the same; plating doesn't "throw" very well to sharp cavities in the work.

    Hydrochloric acid doesn't cut rust as well as several other safer and readily-obtainable acids. Both citric acid and phosphoric acid readily dissolve rust, but are quite gentle on bare iron or steel. I'd choose phosphoric acid, as it leaves a black iron phosphate coating that serves as a good binder for paint, and protects the metal somewhat against further rust. The metal prep products sold at autobody supply stores usually contain dilute phosphoric acid, but you ought to be able to get fairly concentrated stuff at a chemical supply house. As acids go, it's one of the less nasty to deal with. It's part of the flavoring in Coca Cola.

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  • PackardV8
    replied
    t
    For the life of me I don't remember the process name.......Expensive......and only cleanes the passages.
    IIRC The injection of play-doh type material cleaned and could enlarge the passages depending on the media itself.
    Are you thinking of Extrude-Hone? http://www.extrudehone.com/ you're right, it's expensive..
    CASOs need not apply to Extrude-Hone. IIRC, it is $450 for the treatment on a cast iron intake.

    jack vines

    Leave a comment:


  • 52 Ragtop
    replied
    Take it to your local dip stripper, and have them soak it in the paint stripper, then rust solution, it will come out spotless, and probably less than $20.00

    Jim

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