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Removing rust from the inside of an Intake Manifold.

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  • #16
    But electrolysis won't get all the hidden inside corners.
    I built a steel lined tank just to do intake manifolds.
    It had the absolute best possible current path characteristics possible.
    It was first hooked to a battery and a battery charger, and later to a WELDER (to maximize the electrolytic potential).
    After a long session....it still left rust deep inside the manifold.
    How long was your intake in the tank, Mark?tter... I was too impatient <lol>..
    If you had a lot of time, maybe it would work be
    If one were to insist on a chemical dip, I'd suggest the beet juice dip, or the molasses dip.
    BTW... The industrial machine for blasting steel for paint prep is a Wheelabrator.
    http://www.wheelabratorgroup.com/xq/...industries.htm

    Originally posted by TXmark View Post
    electrolysis is my vote removes ONLY the oxidized metal works very well on a manifold, simple efective and nota lot of work
    Last edited by DEEPNHOCK; 09-07-2020, 08:50 AM.
    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

    Jeff


    Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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    • #17
      Originally posted by jclary View Post
      I have a suggestion but it is a little far-fetched for most of us. However, if you have a friend or know of someone with access to a vibratory finishing machine, that would be an excellent prospect for cleaning an intake manifold. It would have to be loaded with a ceramic media that would resist packing and binding in the inner passages but could do a thorough job of cleaning the inside and outside of a manifold.

      Problem is, I have never seen one outside of an industrial setting or machine tool trade show.

      I know exactly what you speak of........only on a smaller scale, "media tumblers" (but don't tumble like a clothes dryer) commonly used to polish brass rifle/pistol cartridge's
      granted, on a much larger scale for manifolds. : )
      61 Lark

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      • #18
        For the life of me I don't remember the process name.......Expensive......and only cleanes the passages.

        IIRC The injection of play-doh type material cleaned and could enlarge the passages depending on the media itself.
        61 Lark

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        • #19
          Originally posted by 4961Studebaker View Post
          For the life of me I don't remember the process name.......Expensive......and only cleanes the passages.

          IIRC The injection of play-doh type material cleaned and could enlarge the passages depending on the media itself.
          Are you thinking of Extrude-Hone?

          http://www.extrudehone.com/

          you're right, it's expensive...

          nate
          --
          55 Commander Starlight
          http://members.cox.net/njnagel

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          • #20
            With my work I acid clean boilers, heat exchangers, cooling towers etc all time. I did a 150 Hp boiler last week, used 150 gallons of 30% Hydrochloric Acid, diluted to a 6% solution circulated for 24 hours. I'd use a 10% strength solution, mixed with hot water - (even HCL has a hard time removing iron oxide - rust), but when heated it does the job. Leave it for at least 24 hours. As a precaution cover the machined surfaces with some type of adhesive tape to stop any pitting. When done give a really good wash/flush to get rid of any remaining acid, soak in water with washing power, (it's an alkaline and will neutralise the surface of the metal and inhibit rust formation).
            Matt
            Brisbane
            Australia
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            Visit my Blog: http://www.mattsoilyrag.blogspot.com.au/

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            • #21
              Take it to your local dip stripper, and have them soak it in the paint stripper, then rust solution, it will come out spotless, and probably less than $20.00

              Jim
              "We can't all be Heroes, Some us just need to stand on the curb and clap as they go by" Will Rogers

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              • #22
                t
                For the life of me I don't remember the process name.......Expensive......and only cleanes the passages.
                IIRC The injection of play-doh type material cleaned and could enlarge the passages depending on the media itself.
                Are you thinking of Extrude-Hone? http://www.extrudehone.com/ you're right, it's expensive..
                CASOs need not apply to Extrude-Hone. IIRC, it is $450 for the treatment on a cast iron intake.

                jack vines
                PackardV8

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                • #23
                  Electrolysis doesn't work well, because it is a field effect. It will do exterior surfaces of a part very well, but the interior surfaces don't "see" the electric field that does the work. Electroplating is much the same; plating doesn't "throw" very well to sharp cavities in the work.

                  Hydrochloric acid doesn't cut rust as well as several other safer and readily-obtainable acids. Both citric acid and phosphoric acid readily dissolve rust, but are quite gentle on bare iron or steel. I'd choose phosphoric acid, as it leaves a black iron phosphate coating that serves as a good binder for paint, and protects the metal somewhat against further rust. The metal prep products sold at autobody supply stores usually contain dilute phosphoric acid, but you ought to be able to get fairly concentrated stuff at a chemical supply house. As acids go, it's one of the less nasty to deal with. It's part of the flavoring in Coca Cola.
                  Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by N8N View Post
                    Are you thinking of Extrude-Hone?

                    http://www.extrudehone.com/

                    you're right, it's expensive...

                    nate
                    Yep, that's what I was thinking of.
                    61 Lark

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                    • #25
                      Use TRECAL it is very cheap but it does take time. I have used it over the years and it is fantastic. Neal

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                      • #26
                        I took a rusty manifold to my local FLAPS a few years ago. They used steel shot blasting to clean it inside and out. I was happy with the results and they didn't charge too much.
                        Gary Ash
                        Dartmouth, Mass.

                        '32 Indy car replica (in progress)
                        ’41 Commander Land Cruiser
                        '48 M5
                        '65 Wagonaire Commander
                        '63 Wagonaire Standard
                        web site at http://www.studegarage.com

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                        • #27
                          Hi guys;

                          with a cast iron intake, once clean and unrust inside / outside ( watever the solution s) how will you prevent rust inside? is there a way like we do in tank..? or we let it ... and it will only be light rust in surface and is ok it's normal ..., or can we spray paint ( I think it's dangerous if it make flakes and it's sucked ... inside )
                          thanks

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                          • #28
                            "Milk Stone Remover", sold at Tractor Supply, is used on Dairy Farms to clean the inside of milk tanks. It is a 75% solution of Phosphoric acid, and I've used it for decades to remove rust from everything. It's about $13 a gallon, and removes rust better than ANY chemical I've ever used. No fuss, no muss, no bother...

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                            • #29
                              I remember using that stuff in my younger years. I was well like because I was lactose intolerant! I'm not the one who contaminated the bulk tank. I can also remember in even younger years using Coca Cola to clean rusty bike parts and chain. I use readily available locally, lemon juice= citric acid for cleaning distributors.

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                              • #30
                                Electrolysis is my first bet but vinegar is also very effective. The vinegar should be the cleaning strength at 20% not the household 10%. You can fortify the vinegar with a bottle of lemon juice. When time is an issue for people in business yes, blasting is the media of choice, for hobbyists it doesn't matter.

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