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How close is close?

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  • How close is close?

    Shop manual for my car states that the total dwell for the car should be between 32&36 degrees.

    Had the 'ol dwell meter out today and she shows a running dwell of 32.9...........I realize that this is within factory spec...........but would a slightly higher number be better???

  • #2
    It is best to have it about where it is now. The reason being that as the rubbing block on the points wears down in time the dwell number will go up towards 36. In other words the point gap narrows.
    Frank van Doorn
    Omaha, Ne.
    1962 GT Hawk 289 4 speed
    1941 Champion streetrod, R-2 Powered, GM 200-4R trans.
    1952 V-8 232 Commander State "Starliner" hardtop OD

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    • #3
      Gap does narrow as the rubbing bolck wears but wouldn't dwell degrees decrease? Dwell being the degrees out of 360 that the rubbing block is in contact-"dwelling"- with the distributor cam. As the block wears the time the points are open is shorter, less contact degrees, so the dwell number goes down. Just sayin

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      • #4
        So do I have cause for concern with 32.9?
        Originally posted by bige View Post
        Gap does narrow as the rubbing bolck wears but wouldn't dwell degrees decrease? Dwell being the degrees out of 360 that the rubbing block is in contact-"dwelling"- with the distributor cam. As the block wears the time the points are open is shorter, less contact degrees, so the dwell number goes down. Just sayin

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        • #5
          Every driving season I put a tiny amount of cam lube on the point cam......along with some fine oil on the wick under the rotor and some drops in the oiler on the side of the housing.......no muss no fuss:-)
          Originally posted by 41 Frank View Post
          It is best to have it about where it is now. The reason being that as the rubbing block on the points wears down in time the dwell number will go up towards 36. In other words the point gap narrows.

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          • #6
            No cause for concern at all. Throw the dwell meter on it once in awhile to see if it's changing with wear.

            How are you feeling? Good to see you're under the hood again and not 'under the weather'.

            ErnieR

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            • #7
              Just realized..............no longer a denizen of the Garden State.................what happened????? I know Cristie got ya on the run:-)

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              • #8
                Originally posted by bige View Post
                Gap does narrow as the rubbing block wears but wouldn't dwell degrees decrease?/Cut/

                NO, actually Ernie, it would not! Of course Frank is right, Dwell INCREASES as the gap decreases! The rubbing block wears and CLOSES the gap increasing the Dwell, so you want the LOW end of the range.

                Most V-8's are 28 to 32 Degrees, so 28 or 30 is good.
                StudeRich
                Second Generation Stude Driver,
                Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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                • #9
                  My mistake...thinking of dwell as time open not closed. Good thing all my cars are electronic

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                  • #10
                    Dwell increases as gap decreases (and vice versa).
                    I have always set my points to get to the dwell I want.
                    Since the rubbing block tends to wear faster than the points, the gap will decrease over time...increasing the dwell.
                    So I always set my dwell to the low number, knowing the dwell will work its way through the acceptable range.
                    And remember, for every two degree's you change the dwell, you change the timing one degree, so always set your dwell before you set the timing.
                    HTIH
                    Jeff


                    Originally posted by bige View Post
                    Gap does narrow as the rubbing bolck wears but wouldn't dwell degrees decrease? Dwell being the degrees out of 360 that the rubbing block is in contact-"dwelling"- with the distributor cam. As the block wears the time the points are open is shorter, less contact degrees, so the dwell number goes down. Just sayin
                    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                    Jeff


                    Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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                    • #11
                      So.......I will just leave the points as they are, correct?..........at 32.9............as a side note........the car never has idled at a rock stead 650RPM

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                      • #12
                        That is one of the possible symptoms of a worn distributor shaft.
                        As the shaft oscillates, it can cause the gap to increase and decrease, and that will cause a small timing change, and correspondingly, a small idle rpm change.
                        Nitpicky for sure, but a possible cause.


                        Originally posted by Werdegast View Post
                        So.......I will just leave the points as they are, correct?..........at 32.9............as a side note........the car never has idled at a rock stead 650RPM
                        HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                        Jeff


                        Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                        Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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                        • #13
                          Some dwell meters will respond to the real unsteady dwell from a badly worn distributor. There is a lot of middle ground between brand new and completely worn out, and all distributors are in there somewhere. I remember the first time I used a timing light on an electronically triggered ignition car and being A-MAZED at how steady the timing mark was

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                          • #14
                            It has done this since new!
                            Originally posted by DEEPNHOCK View Post
                            That is one of the possible symptoms of a worn distributor shaft.
                            As the shaft oscillates, it can cause the gap to increase and decrease, and that will cause a small timing change, and correspondingly, a small idle rpm change.
                            Nitpicky for sure, but a possible cause.

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                            • #15
                              I utilize a Fluke digital meter. Back in the day when I had a small Milton analog meter the arm would also vacillate somewhat...
                              Originally posted by Dan Timberlake View Post
                              Some dwell meters will respond to the real unsteady dwell from a badly worn distributor. There is a lot of middle ground between brand new and completely worn out, and all distributors are in there somewhere. I remember the first time I used a timing light on an electronically triggered ignition car and being A-MAZED at how steady the timing mark was

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