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Tremec T45RS 5 speed swap questions

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  • Henry Votel
    replied
    Yeah Bob. Atta Boy!

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  • BShaw
    replied
    Thanks and appreciation to DustyBob Wagner I have a GT Hawk clutch operating shaft and can now proceed. Made some progress today and the pics that follow show how the clutch connection is going.

    Below is a pic showing the new GT Hawk clutch operating shaft along with my original 60 Hawk's shaft. The new shaft is shorter yet the offset inside lever places it in the same plane as the original.



    Below is my original shaft end bracket. Per DustyBob's own conversion, I will remove the end from the rest of the bracket.



    Below is the end piece after the rivets were ground off to allow a new bracket to be fabricated and attached to it.



    Below shows the two transmission mounting points I will use for a new shaft-end mounting bracket. I am holding the shaft end piece roughly in place for reference.



    Below shows the cardboard mounting bracket I first made for test-fit and measurements along with the steel bracket made as a result. This is just tack welded by me and will be finish welded by a friend who actually knows how to weld stuff that needs to stay welded. Once welded (and prettied up a bit) I will mark and drill all the bolt holes and assemble it.



    Below is the new mount being held up for a test fit. I see no reason why this won't work out fine.



    Also, I will be using the rear mount on the transmission. When I notched and strengthened the batwing crossmember the bracing I added had a vertical lip that I aligned with the rear tranny mount as seen in the photo below.



    Below is the rear mount bracket I fabbed. Like the clutch shaft bracket, it is just tacked and will be properly welded by my friend.



    Below is the new rear trans mount and bracket held in place.



    Next step: I have a ton of things to get done but I think I can go ahead and measure for the drive shaft and get that shortened and balanced.

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  • BShaw
    replied
    Thanks to one of the forum folks it looks like I will soon have the parts I'll need. Again, I will try to remember to take pics.

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  • WCP
    replied
    Bob, that offset lever looked a bit similar to an unidentified part in a box of clutch parts, but when I checked, the offset is reversed. That part is an "outer release shaft lever" #0203-28 in the 59-64 parts book. Possibly the one pictured was for a right hand drive car. It appears to have been slipped over the shaft and welded in position. It may be my imagination but there seems to be a hole at the top outer edge, that would be for a fastening pin. For reference, the center to centre measurement or lever radius is 2.75". The offset is about 7/8" laterally. It looks like the one in the picture has been tightened up (sharper bends).
    I recently sold a complete clutch lever setup for a GT Hawk, but I think all the parts were there. Maybe this was a spare, or for something else. The box also contains a lever/tube with grease fitting setup that is a mystery to me - possibly for a light truck. It's similar to what was on my mid 70's Jeep Cherokee.

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  • BShaw
    replied
    Originally posted by junior View Post
    I'm thinking this is the route I would take, only thing that I would change from this set up is to triangulate the pin that the shaft fits onto by connecting it to a second spot such as another bellhousing bolt...this would stop the pin from wanting to swivel or walk around on that single bolt, but perhaps I'm just over-thinking the solution here. Shortening the shaft and fabbing another lever should not present too much of a problem, just keep the same centerline distances as the stock stude lever and all should be good. Seems the least amount of trouble to go this route, and you know the stock geometry will be intact and the clutch operation should be just like stock. Hope this works. Junior
    Yes, that sure looks like my best option. i agree that a better multi-point bracket would be better. Once i get the shaft shortened and with an offset lever, I think there will be enough clearance to use the original end support pin/bracket but with the bracket part modified to either span the two bottom trans bolts or one bottom bolt and one on the trans side (there is an ear there that can be used).

    Thanks all for the suggestions. I will post some photos when I get the linkage fabbed up.

    Oh, if anyone does have a hawk clutch operating shaft to sell me please PM me. I'd like to have an extra before I start cutting and to use for comparison to ensure I don't screw up the correct geometry.

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  • junior
    replied
    I'm thinking this is the route I would take, only thing that I would change from this set up is to triangulate the pin that the shaft fits onto by connecting it to a second spot such as another bellhousing bolt...this would stop the pin from wanting to swivel or walk around on that single bolt, but perhaps I'm just over-thinking the solution here. Shortening the shaft and fabbing another lever should not present too much of a problem, just keep the same centerline distances as the stock stude lever and all should be good. Seems the least amount of trouble to go this route, and you know the stock geometry will be intact and the clutch operation should be just like stock. Hope this works. Junior

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  • BShaw
    replied
    Originally posted by StudegaryB View Post
    I suspect that that offset lever was custom fabricated along with a shortened shaft. The lever on my Hawk is straight.
    You may be correct though the article this picture came from does not mention any change to the clutch operating shaft so I assumed it was stock. Nonetheless, i could certainly modify a shaft similarly. I checked the SI catalog and did not find any later Hawk shafts available.

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  • StudegaryB
    replied
    I suspect that that offset lever was custom fabricated along with a shortened shaft. The lever on my Hawk is straight.

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  • BShaw
    replied
    Originally posted by StudegaryB View Post
    I put a Mustang T-5 in my 61 Hawk. It cleared the batwing crossmember, which I was adding since it was left off in the previous restoration. I felt the Hawk frame needed all the help it could get stiffness wise. The clutch linkage only needed a simple support bracket added then it aligned fine. I used Dan Giblins kit and have been pleased with the results.
    Yep, as noted in one of my recent posts the T45RS I am using is apparently wider than a T-5 and the tail is not as "slender", thus my current clutch shaft fitment problems.

    POSSIBLY...

    I just finished reviewing all the 5-speed infor I had bookmarked in the past and one of the articles in Bob Johnstone's EXCELLENT WEBSITE www.studebaker-info.org had an interesting photo that may point to a solution for my clutch linkage. Look at the right photo below and note the offset "lever" on the clutch operating shaft. My 60 Hawk's clutch shaft has a straight lever. This offset means (as I see it) the shaft length is shorter while maintaining proper alignment of the shaft lever-to-release rod-to-fork shaft. This photo is of a 63 GT Hawk. My 59-64 Stude manuals do not show the various clutch operating shafts used...only pictures the straight-lever style like mine (compare this to my pic in POST #59). I'm thinking that if I could swap out that shaft and make a simple support bracket (either as this person had done or better yet using the Stude cap/bracket) I'd be golden.

    QUESTION: Did all 61-64 C/K clutch operating shafts have this offset lever and, if so, does anyone have an extra laying around to, first, measure the length to confirm that is is indeed shorter and, second, sell it to 'lil ol' me?

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  • StudegaryB
    replied
    I put a Mustang T-5 in my 61 Hawk. It cleared the batwing crossmember, which I was adding since it was left off in the previous restoration. I felt the Hawk frame needed all the help it could get stiffness wise. The clutch linkage only needed a simple support bracket added then it aligned fine. I used Dan Giblins kit and have been pleased with the results.

    Leave a comment:


  • t walgamuth
    replied
    I don't see why a cable or hydraulic would not work. You'll have to measure and see how much travel will be available and mount the new devices so they move the clutch fork the desired amount with the appropriate pedal travel.

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  • BShaw
    replied
    Originally posted by junior View Post
    Sorry `bout getting sidetracked on the tangent, to help put the choo choo back on the rails, if you do decide to go with a hydraulic set-up, here is some info that may help you with what I discovered with regards to the slave cylinder needed to mate up with a hydraulic t/o bearing. This has worked out well for the most part, 1 little glitch in using this set-up for the last year and half, but it may be due to my dumbass move of not lubing the clevis pin. Regards, Junior.

    http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...slave+cylinder
    Thanks! Good thread and info. As the Stude clutch fork has a shaft versus an arm, do you think a slave cylinder has enough power to work if attached to the stock fork shaft arm (versus using a hydraulic throwout bearing)? If that would work i would not need to disassemble everything.

    Alternatively, would a cable clutch assembly work? I know there are pros and cons to clutch cables but as this car is not high performance and going to be treated reasonably, might that be a viable option?

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  • junior
    replied
    Sorry `bout getting sidetracked on the tangent, to help put the choo choo back on the rails, if you do decide to go with a hydraulic set-up, here is some info that may help you with what I discovered with regards to the slave cylinder needed to mate up with a hydraulic t/o bearing. This has worked out well for the most part, 1 little glitch in using this set-up for the last year and half, but it may be due to my dumbass move of not lubing the clevis pin. Regards, Junior.

    http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...slave+cylinder
    Last edited by junior; 11-25-2012, 04:27 PM.

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  • BShaw
    replied
    I guess I will need to start a new thread.

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  • WCP
    replied
    If you place a cooler or condenser in front of the radiator, it is important to place it as far forward of the radiator as possible to maximize total cooling, and cooling loss in the radiator.

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