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Tremec T45RS 5 speed swap questions

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  • #61
    Sounds like this would be an ideal application for a hydraulic clutch, with the slave cylinder concentric with the transmission input shaft. Install a diaphragm clutch disc at the same time.
    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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    • #62
      Sounds like this would be an ideal application for a hydraulic clutch, with the slave cylinder concentric with the transmission input shaft.
      Agree completely, Gord. I now use hydraulic throwout bearings on all my modified cars and trucks. Just put one in my '55 E12 with Packard V8 and T89. Can't believe how much easier it is to operate. They take much less pedal throw to operate also, so you can use more leverage. IIRC, mine came from a Chevy.

      BTW, for a hydraulic clutch master cylinder, I did the old second brake cylinder mounted beside the original brake master cylinder. Alan and I have been doing this one for going on forty years now. Wish I'd have taken photos of the way I modified the clutch pedal to push backward instead of forward, but it wasn't terribly difficult.

      jack vines
      PackardV8

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      • #63
        If there are more details on "how to" do a hydraulic set-up I'd sure like to read up on that approach. I'd also still like to know if there is any viable way to work with what I have.
        sigpic
        Bob Shaw
        Rush City, Minnesota
        1960 Hawk - www.northstarstudebakers.com
        "The farther I go, the behinder I get."

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        • #64
          Originally posted by junior View Post
          trying to upload....
          Hi Junior, what is the cooler under there, please?
          Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

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          • #65
            Also, what is the length of these transmissions please?
            Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

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            • #66
              To answer your question.
              This cross-member usually has to be removed for clutch R&R on manual trans cars.
              There are 4 bolts for each frame rail and the outrigger body mount bolt holes.
              (Remember to count or measure your shim thickness on the outboard body mounts)

              You can't just 'toss it out', but you can remove it to do your removal and install work.
              It is the body mount for the door pillar area.
              Now, you can 'modify' it, so it will clear the new transmission.
              In a perfect world, it would be best to do that 'on the car'....before you do the work.
              But, if you were to build an alignment jig that uses the stock bolt hole positions as an index....
              Then you could modify the crossmember off the car and trial fit and modify it on the car.
              Probably overkill if you are just 'thinning it' (your words), but needed if you had to split it to put a dropped center section in....
              T'were it mine, I'd build a jig and modify it on the workbench, where welding and grinding are easier.
              HTIH
              Jeff


              Originally posted by BShaw View Post
              <snip>
              My question is, can that cross member be removed and worked without screwing up everything? I don't see any way around modding it (for 1-1/4 or so additional bottom clearance) so what precautions/recommendations have you? Thanks.
              HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

              Jeff


              Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



              Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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              • #67
                Originally posted by t walgamuth View Post
                Hi Junior, what is the cooler under there, please?
                That is an aftermarket auto trans cooler, has now been removed. It was installed in front of my radiator but I was having engine cooling issues so I moved it under the body...only increased my trans. temp about 5 degrees, so worked well in that location even though others advised not to do it, and solved the engine cooling issue.
                sigpic
                1954 C5 Hamilton car.

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                • #68
                  It is surprising how small a blockage of the radiator can result in cooling issues!
                  Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

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                  • #69
                    If you place a cooler or condenser in front of the radiator, it is important to place it as far forward of the radiator as possible to maximize total cooling, and cooling loss in the radiator.

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                    • #70
                      I guess I will need to start a new thread.
                      sigpic
                      Bob Shaw
                      Rush City, Minnesota
                      1960 Hawk - www.northstarstudebakers.com
                      "The farther I go, the behinder I get."

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        Sorry `bout getting sidetracked on the tangent, to help put the choo choo back on the rails, if you do decide to go with a hydraulic set-up, here is some info that may help you with what I discovered with regards to the slave cylinder needed to mate up with a hydraulic t/o bearing. This has worked out well for the most part, 1 little glitch in using this set-up for the last year and half, but it may be due to my dumbass move of not lubing the clevis pin. Regards, Junior.

                        http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...slave+cylinder
                        Last edited by junior; 11-25-2012, 04:27 PM.
                        sigpic
                        1954 C5 Hamilton car.

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                        • #72
                          Originally posted by junior View Post
                          Sorry `bout getting sidetracked on the tangent, to help put the choo choo back on the rails, if you do decide to go with a hydraulic set-up, here is some info that may help you with what I discovered with regards to the slave cylinder needed to mate up with a hydraulic t/o bearing. This has worked out well for the most part, 1 little glitch in using this set-up for the last year and half, but it may be due to my dumbass move of not lubing the clevis pin. Regards, Junior.

                          http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...slave+cylinder
                          Thanks! Good thread and info. As the Stude clutch fork has a shaft versus an arm, do you think a slave cylinder has enough power to work if attached to the stock fork shaft arm (versus using a hydraulic throwout bearing)? If that would work i would not need to disassemble everything.

                          Alternatively, would a cable clutch assembly work? I know there are pros and cons to clutch cables but as this car is not high performance and going to be treated reasonably, might that be a viable option?
                          sigpic
                          Bob Shaw
                          Rush City, Minnesota
                          1960 Hawk - www.northstarstudebakers.com
                          "The farther I go, the behinder I get."

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            I don't see why a cable or hydraulic would not work. You'll have to measure and see how much travel will be available and mount the new devices so they move the clutch fork the desired amount with the appropriate pedal travel.
                            Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

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                            • #74
                              I put a Mustang T-5 in my 61 Hawk. It cleared the batwing crossmember, which I was adding since it was left off in the previous restoration. I felt the Hawk frame needed all the help it could get stiffness wise. The clutch linkage only needed a simple support bracket added then it aligned fine. I used Dan Giblins kit and have been pleased with the results.

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                              • #75
                                Originally posted by StudegaryB View Post
                                I put a Mustang T-5 in my 61 Hawk. It cleared the batwing crossmember, which I was adding since it was left off in the previous restoration. I felt the Hawk frame needed all the help it could get stiffness wise. The clutch linkage only needed a simple support bracket added then it aligned fine. I used Dan Giblins kit and have been pleased with the results.
                                Yep, as noted in one of my recent posts the T45RS I am using is apparently wider than a T-5 and the tail is not as "slender", thus my current clutch shaft fitment problems.

                                POSSIBLY...

                                I just finished reviewing all the 5-speed infor I had bookmarked in the past and one of the articles in Bob Johnstone's EXCELLENT WEBSITE www.studebaker-info.org had an interesting photo that may point to a solution for my clutch linkage. Look at the right photo below and note the offset "lever" on the clutch operating shaft. My 60 Hawk's clutch shaft has a straight lever. This offset means (as I see it) the shaft length is shorter while maintaining proper alignment of the shaft lever-to-release rod-to-fork shaft. This photo is of a 63 GT Hawk. My 59-64 Stude manuals do not show the various clutch operating shafts used...only pictures the straight-lever style like mine (compare this to my pic in POST #59). I'm thinking that if I could swap out that shaft and make a simple support bracket (either as this person had done or better yet using the Stude cap/bracket) I'd be golden.

                                QUESTION: Did all 61-64 C/K clutch operating shafts have this offset lever and, if so, does anyone have an extra laying around to, first, measure the length to confirm that is is indeed shorter and, second, sell it to 'lil ol' me?

                                sigpic
                                Bob Shaw
                                Rush City, Minnesota
                                1960 Hawk - www.northstarstudebakers.com
                                "The farther I go, the behinder I get."

                                Comment

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