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  • Lots of blue smoke

    Had my 63 GT on a long downhill grade when I hit the gas on level gound I left a big cloud of blue smoke & it continued for quite a while every time I accelerated.I had the motor rebuilt 3000 miles ago & this is the 1st time I've noticed this problem.I checked the compression & 1 2 3 4 & 5 were 120 lbs. #7 & 8 were 130 lbs.Number 6 was 100 lbs. Am I wrong or would this be the problem ? Tomorrow I will be checking the valve stem seals to see if they are OK.
    Anybody have any further ideas.I really don't feel like pulling the motor again.I'me getting too old & tired.Apart from being a rust free SoCal car it has been nothing but problems in the 9yrs. I have owned it

  • #2
    Are you sure it's burning oil? Burning oil usually emits light or white color smoke. You could be flooding the engine with too much gas. This should be fairly easy to check.


    Good Luck

    Don
    don

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    • #3
      It sounds like the rings haven't seated properly. Your compression pressures are on the low side, especially #6 at 100psi. Try squirting some engine oil in the low cylinder, then check the compression. If it comes up considreably, there is a problem with the rings sealing. Was the engine rebored and new pistons installed or were the cylinders honed and new rings installed on the old pistons? There may be some taper and a bit of an out of round condition in the cylinders that will cause an improper ring seal. Bud

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      • #4
        The motor was bored +30 over & crank -10 under I don't know if the rebuilder used chrome rings or iron

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        • #5
          I think you are correct in checking the valve guide seals...on a long downhill grade the vacuum created in the cylinders is high pulling oil past weak seals. That's what I would check first, plus it's the easiest and cheapest to fix...hope that's just the problem. Never worked on a Stude engine before, so I'm not even sure of what kind of stem seals it would have. Junior
          sigpic
          1954 C5 Hamilton car.

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          • #6
            Hi Kevin,

            I understand the best fix is Ford seals (FELPRO SS 72683).

            Good luck.

            Paul

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            • #7
              My 63 GT with 96,000 miles shows 160+ PSi on all cylinders. Your rings are not seating or valves leaking.
              The 1950 Champion Starlight
              Santa Barbara
              CA

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              • #8
                Perhaps the valve guides were not replaced?
                sigpic
                In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

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                • #9
                  Hi kmul221
                  Few musings... 3000 miles since build, over how many years? Everyone sounds on track with the rings not seated, only thing would be should have constant smoke: idle, accel, cruise & decel. Valve stems/guides usually "puff" on startup or after decel (going down a hill). Give the compression test another go, put a couple "squirts" oil in each cylinder, roll the engine over a couple spins to coat the walls, then compression test. If the number comes up more than 10 percent, ring sealing is the issue. If not, guides and seals. Either way, the compression numbers over all cylinders should not vary by more than 10 percent, low to high, for best running. More spread than that & engine also doesn't run right (tune wise).
                  Where about are you located? If even remotely close to SK I would be happy to lend a hand...

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                  • #10
                    I think you are correct in checking the valve guide seals...on a long downhill grade the vacuum created in the cylinders is high pulling oil past weak seals. That's what I would check first, plus it's the easiest and cheapest to fix...hope that's just the problem. Never worked on a Stude engine before, so I'm not even sure of what kind of stem seals it would have. Junior
                    The valve stem seals should resemble the umbrella type of seals like these...


                    Usually, after 40 years or so, if these aren't changed, they can turn rather hard and brittle. When I did the heads on the '55 the seals had to be replaced as well. The Studebaker vendors can supply the seals, as well as the FLAPS. I got mine from NAPA which leads me to the next part, the type. Depending on how fancy you want to go, you can use the traditional style.....


                    The Barrel Style, which is what is on the '55


                    And it looks like there's a new version which resembles the accelerator pump seal.....


                    Depending on which seal is purchased, the end result should be the same, that is there won't be any oil leaching past the seals. The umbrella seals should work without any problems. I went with the barrel guys because I like the modern design .
                    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
                    1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
                    1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
                    1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

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                    • #11
                      Do the newer style valve stem seals grip onto the cylinder head and allow the valve stems to slide back & forth through the seals or do the seals ride back & forth on the stem like the original seals?
                      sigpic
                      In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

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                      • #12
                        Kevin,

                        I am thinking that your AFB was allowing too much gas to be flowing through your engine, and that gas was washing down the cylinder walls never allowing the rings to seat.

                        Don't forget that your metering rods in the primary circuit were not metering at ALL which explaining all the black crap that was coming out of your exhaust pipes, excessive oil consumption and getting 6 miles per gallon.

                        This new two barrel that you are running may be doing the same thing to you just not to the same extent.

                        Have you got the new jets and metering rods yet for your AFB? Before you do anything drastic get your AFB back on, get it metered properly and run it for a few hundred miles. I'll bet your bottom dollar that your oil consumption will go away, your rings will seat and you will get more power and better mileage.

                        I wish I had more time and would help you set it up.

                        Allen
                        1964 GT Hawk
                        PSMCDR 2014
                        Best time: 14.473 sec. 96.57 MPH quarter mile
                        PSMCDR 2013
                        Best time: 14.654 sec. 94.53 MPH quarter

                        Victoria, Canada

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                        • #13
                          Do the newer style valve stem seals grip onto the cylinder head and allow the valve stems to slide back & forth through the seals or do the seals ride back & forth on the stem like the original seals?
                          The barrel seals that I used grip to the top of the valve guide with that metal ring clip around it. The valves themselves slide back and forth through the seal while the seal grips to the valve guide.
                          1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
                          1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
                          1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
                          1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

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