Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Pertronix on Lark VI ?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Pertronix on Lark VI ?

    I have a '59 Lark VI that has been running rather crappy, so I started to go through the ignition system. It was erratic...sometimes it would run well, other times it would sputter and backfire...then I had an epiphany.. Well actually I got a nice shock on my right hand when I was setting the timing.

    At first I was PO'd, then very happy as it made my troubleshooting much easier. I figured that the lead wire coming out of the distrubutor was bad. So I am now wondering whether I should try to just replace the wire or install a Pertronix unit while I am at it? I put one on my '66 VW a few years back and it was easy and has been reliable. I went on the Pertronix website and looked at the application pdf file and it states that #1569 is a match but that the distributor requires modification. Has anyone else installed one of these units who can tell me to what extent I woukd need to make changes???

    Thanks.

  • #2
    I obtained a Pertronix unit for my '60 lark 170 through Cathcart Studebaker. Yes, one tab on the base plate (inside) had to be removed. The installation made a great improvement in the running of the car. I carried a spare distributor, set up, just in case, but never used it.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Tom B View Post
      I obtained a Pertronix unit for my '60 lark 170 through Cathcart Studebaker. Yes, one tab on the base plate (inside) had to be removed. The installation made a great improvement in the running of the car. I carried a spare distributor, set up, just in case, but never used it.
      Thanks for the tip, Tom. Do you remember how much it was? It's been years since I installed one on the Bosch 009. Did the unit come with modification instructions or was it fairly obvious?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Tom B View Post
        I obtained a Pertronix unit for my '60 lark 170 through Cathcart Studebaker. Yes, one tab on the base plate (inside) had to be removed. The installation made a great improvement in the running of the car. I carried a spare distributor, set up, just in case, but never used it.
        I began having trouble with my 170 after 3 years with a Pertronix, it was requiring excessive timing advance. This apparently is a known problem, and I sent my old unit back. They are replacing it with a new one even though it's 3 years old, so I am happy with them. On the otherhand, I spoke with Bill Cathcart just before sending the unit to Pertronix, and he said he has stopped selling them for reliablilty reasons. I'll keep a good points dizzy with me too.
        Ron Dame
        '63 Champ

        Comment


        • #5
          Cant remember exactly what it cost, $100 plus or minus.

          My unit failed after a week, Bill Cathcart replaced it, I ran the car a couple of years and sold it. I haven't heard since how it's running. There could be a reliability problem. I'm running points in my '55, 6 volt Pertronix in my '55, but it only gets a few hundred miles a year.

          Comment


          • #6
            I checked with the local Carquest on my lunch hour. I've actually been surprised at the oddball old car stuff they can find, as well as snowmobile parts. $145 is a little steep, given the reliability issues mentioned, although I haven't had any problems with the VW, but that was with a new Bosch distributor. I think I will just remove the distributor and change out the wire. It can't be that difficult and it would be a lot cheaper.

            Comment


            • #7
              Yes, even if you put a thousand miles a year on would still take quite a few sets of points to make up the $$, plus a set of points is easier to pack than a spare distributor :-)

              Comment


              • #8
                The points screwed up on my 57 Champion going across the Outerbridge Crossing from NJ to SI. Pulled over, adjusted the problem and was on my way! Anything electronic is not fixable on the road. I know, took out the entire electronic computer in my 81 Imperial and replaced the intake and put in a carb. Electronic may be new school but I am old school. Imagine carrying a spare computer! Sorry for the rant, but modern is not always the best, IMHO!!!
                1957 Studebaker Champion 2 door. Staten Island, New York.

                "Education is not the learning of facts, but the training of the mind to think." -Albert Einstein

                Comment


                • #9
                  Instead of going with a Pertronix unit I'd recommend trying this: http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/s...12v+conversion

                  A heck of a lot cheaper and easier than Pertronix, plus you can get parts for it on a Sunday afternoon if you break down.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I have mixed feelings about the Pertronix ignition parts. I had a problem with the Pertronix unit on my Avanti, but I've had one in my Hawk for years with no problem. I've had 3 cars towed in for problems with Pertronix ignitions in recent history. Two for Pertronix ignition coil failures and one with a module problem. I don't care what Pertronix says about using their coil without a ballast resistor. I say don't do it as the coil will overheat and fail in a short time without the resistor. The coil output voltage is only about 5 kilovolts higher without the resistor and most Studebaker engines wouldn't notice the difference. NAPA and Standard Motor Parts still supply good points and condensers for alot less money than the cost of Pertronix parts. Bud

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I've been playing with distributor modifications for many years and at this point have a highly modified prestolite/autolite style unit in my 63 OHV powered 59 Lark VI. Unless you plan to race it or drive it every day at high RPM then the best way to go is to leave the points in, or get a transistor type box so the points are then only a trigger and will not burn out. One can wire them in so if it fails the unit can be bypassed to run in original trim. I have used a Mallory multi-strike Capacitive Discharge unit with good results but any unit, such as an MSD, that allows one to use the points is worth it. I have modified the distributor’s internal plate on mine to use a Mallory magnetic pickup, which takes a bit of time and work since most units are setup to rotate opposite from a Studebaker. I have yet to put hundreds of thousands of miles on the unit, so, as you will find, the most reliable, easy to use and service, cost effective, proven way to go, is the original setup. I have more time and ideas than sense so I will play with anything to see what can be done. If you have the money take a look at http://www.stude.com/Tbow/ and if you get the Studebaker Drivers Club magazine he has an ad in the back pages. Dave has a really nice distributors for a six cylinder, or an eight, that looks nice and neat and has everything contained in the distributor. I have boxes and wires all over the place as I am more concerned with using older 60/70’s tech to get that old home built street mod look. It’s all just a matter of time, money, drivability and authenticity. Points will give you all that but it has it’s limitations, mainly RPM, and as long as you don’t want more than 200 HP from you six, it will give you many miles of enjoyment. A nice touch would be an original transistor unit from a late model Studebaker. I used one for many years and had no trouble. As long as all other parts, shaft lobes, weights, drive gear or bushings are not worn in the distributor because no matter what you do you might have an erratic ignition, then the only thing to do is check the point gap as usually because the points block will still wear but the contacts will not burn out.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Can not beat points......simple fast no hassel!
                        Originally posted by Ron Dame View Post
                        I began having trouble with my 170 after 3 years with a Pertronix, it was requiring excessive timing advance. This apparently is a known problem, and I sent my old unit back. They are replacing it with a new one even though it's 3 years old, so I am happy with them. On the otherhand, I spoke with Bill Cathcart just before sending the unit to Pertronix, and he said he has stopped selling them for reliablilty reasons. I'll keep a good points dizzy with me too.

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X