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  • Fender rust prevention

    I am in the process of putting new fenders on my 64 Daytona. In order to prevent rust on the headlight area I made small panels to that attaches to the front headlight panel. It seals the are above the headlight that traps mud. I am not sure what to do with the rear of the fender. I don't know if I should make a larger panel to block this area off or just try to seam seal the gap between the outer part of the fender and the inner part that attaches to the pillar. I have had to replace 2 previous sets of fenders that rusted out and I don't what to do it again.

    The early Mustangs had similar panels to prevent rust. Too bad the brains (?) at the engineering department didn't think of adding these as those areas rusted from 1953 to 1966.

    Any suggestions?

    T-cab

  • #2
    I like the idea of a "buffer" panel before the seam, to keep all the junk out. However; what about maybe treating it with POR-15, then doing a heavy application of spray on bed liner, that is commonly seen in your local FLAPS in the rattle cans? That might seal it up enough, and then you could just hose it out when you wash the car, to prevent unnecessary built up of dirt. Just a idea though, I've never tried it.
    Dylan Wills
    Everett, Wa.


    1961 Lark 4 door wagon
    1961 Lark 4 door wagon #2 (Wife's car!)
    1955 VW Beetle (Went to the dark side)
    1914 Ford Model T

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    • #3
      Believe it or not, this is supposed to be a pair of rubber mats that fill in the hole between the inner fender, cowl, and rear fender on the Larks. The mats are held in with some buttons that push into some prepunched holes around the area back there, and are designed to keep the water and whatever from getting packed in the lower portion of the rear fender. However, in most of the cars, these mats are absent, or rotted away, and like yours truly, usually they are not installed until it's almost too late. I did pick up a pair of these items at the South Bend meet with some inner fender mats a few years ago, so they are, or were being reproduced, along with the buttons, but I cannot remember the name of the vendor who had them.

      These are the filler panels:



      1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
      1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
      1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
      1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

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      • #4
        That is not where the water gets in. It's all that water coming down the "A" pillar rushing under the top of the fender between the cowl and the fender and rusting the fender out all the way down to the bottom.

        The best bet after using Por15 on and in the fold at the rear of the fender, would be installing an INNER FENDER (wheelwell) usually plastic like other U.S. cars of the 70's have to keep the tire wash out when the car is driven.
        New inner fender rear corner seals will not help this.
        StudeRich
        Second Generation Stude Driver,
        Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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        • #5
          Huh, I already said that, which is the functionality of the panels to get the water and snow to rush down the inner fender, rather than the outer fender, but alright.......
          1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
          1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
          1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
          1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

          Comment


          • #6
            Ya got to keep the water out of those rear seams. In 1981, when I put new fenders on my '64 Cruiser, I left them in the sun to be sure they were dry, then used wands to spray plain old red rust primer into the seams. Let that dry for a few days, them packed the seams with asphalt roof sealer. Its messy, but just use your fingers as if you were packing a wheel bearing. Finally, I used that same roof sealer to make a smooth cover over the seal so that there was no edge to catch the road splash. I know there are probably better products now, but after 29 St. Louis MO winters, tha only thing not rusty on that car are those front fenders. Also, consider drilling your radio antenna hole in the cowl, and not into that nicely sealed fender seam.

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            • #7
              T-CAB,this is my thought! (when I do my Champ with n.o.s. fenders) I'll flush out the rear seam where the two panels come together with wax and grease remover.then let a two part epoxy run into the seam,let dry. then caulk all seams with windsheild urethane.then I'll make metal panels(heavier gauge than origional) that will bolt on after the fender is in it's right location.this panel will fit the shape of the fender to a "T" less the thickness of some kind of plastic/vinal door edge gaurd to cushion against the fender.then caulk/brush/spray undercoat to seal off that surface once installed,(something that will release fairly easy when and if maintaining is needed,do'nt want to fight getting it off later)

              THAT'S MY PLAN,AND I'M STICKING TO IT!
              Joseph R. Zeiger

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              • #8
                I like "63T-cab's" idea. I think I will also add a rear baffle as well. I have attached a picture of the front splash shield that I have made. Will be attaching rubber around it when I put it on.

                T-cab

                http://i589.photobucket.com/albums/s...lashshield.jpg

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                • #9
                  Anyone besides me using this?
                  http://www.amsoil.com/storefront/amh.aspx

                  It goes on thin and wicks in to seams. Cleans off with thinner or spirits. Not to be used before painting.
                  "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                  Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                  Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                  '33 Rockne 10,
                  '51 Commander Starlight,
                  '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée",
                  '56 Sky Hawk

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                  • #10
                    I am at the stage stage w/my '64 Daytona, and I have been using epoxy primer. I shot a fair amount into the seam, and I plan on using seam sealer after I spray sealer, prior to paint.

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                    • #11
                      Before I installed the NOS front fenders on my '55 sedan I stood them on end (Headlight up) and cleaned out the bottom edge with a hack saw blade and compressed air. I brushed POR15 on the entire area, allowing it to fill the edge of the fender. Its only been two years, but I expect it to outlast me.

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                      • #12
                        I used a flap wheel on a grinder to take the seam area down to bare metal. After that, I filled in the seam with new seam sealer from Eastwood. Finally, Like Tom B, I used POR-15 metal prep and paint on the entire area.
                        Scott Rodgers
                        Los Angeles
                        SDC Member since 1989
                        \'60 Lark HT
                        \'63 Wagonaire
                        \'66 Frankenbaker

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                        • #13
                          I like the thought of using materials applied directly to the metal for rust prevention. What ever you use, it should have good adhesion and have some flexibility. The reason I say flexibility is that if it dries to a hard brittle surface, it could crack and cause moisture and air to get in the cracks. When that happens, you then have a rust incubator. As far as installing inner liners, mud baffles, or protective panels, you have to be careful that they don't allow stuff to accumulate behind them. How many of you have removed trim, or gravel shields only to find the metal behind them packed with moist dirt and the sheet metal completely rusted away? I have had to "re-create" whole sections of sheet metal because of this.

                          If you treat the metal with the right product, you can occasionally use a light duty pressure washer to clean the areas above the head lights and inner fender areas when necessary. Nothing replaces "due diligence" and plain old hard work. Merely installing some kind of home-made shields will probably give you a false sense of security, cause you to neglect what you can't see, and result in severe damage by the time you discover it.
                          John Clary
                          Greer, SC

                          SDC member since 1975

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                          • #14
                            Have used a zinc anti-rust spray-on (over bare metal) before assembly, then (after several days drying) a liberal coating of POR. After assembly, sprayed sound deadner/undercoating several times over seams. Local body man wonders who I am "saving" this car for ? ?.
                            Paul K

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                            • #15
                              Ordered Classic Enterprises' inner fender kits for the 55K, front and rear. Bodyshop installed them just after paint, then sprayed them with a satin black finish, before undercoating and rustproofing. Had the panels for the headlights and the front fender to cowl/vent area, had the panels for the rear wheels too. Overkill? Maybe.....but it's so disheartening to watch the rust re-appear. Worth it IMO.
                              Dave Warren (Perry Mason by day, Perry Como by night)

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