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  • Smokybaker - cured

    I recently swaped in a used engine in my 62 Lark V-8 and it smoked quite badly on start up. The replacement engine had been sitting for well over five, and probably many more, years. Based on advice from the forum I fed an engine cleaner (Seafoam) down the carb while running, feathering the throttle, and that seemed to help quite a bit (stuck rings). I drove the car in the parade of a local show (Stowe, VT) last Saturday and it still smoked during acceleration from stop, which was a little embarasing in front of the crowd that lined the street at the reviewing stand. It probably didn't give our mark a great name, especailly since the 59 Lark V-8 in front of me did the same thing. Anyway when I got home I replaced the valve seals with the modern F*rd (FELPRO SS 72683) seals (again based on recommendations from the forum) and that cured the smoking problem. The old seals had the consistency of hard plastic and would shatter in pieces when tapped with a hammer.

    I realize this isn't the cure-all for all engine smoking issues, but for engines that have been sitting for a while this seemed to work well and didn't cost a ton of money.
    Dan Peterson
    Montpelier, VT
    1960 Lark V-8 Convertible
    1960 Lark V-8 Convertible (parts car)

  • #2
    Dan, were these a 'drop in' replacement, or was there some type of modification involved?
    Paul
    Winston-Salem, NC
    Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: www.studebakerskytop.com

    Comment


    • #3
      Paul,
      It was just a plane jane 1962 259 pulled out of a parts car.
      Dan Peterson
      Montpelier, VT
      1960 Lark V-8 Convertible
      1960 Lark V-8 Convertible (parts car)

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by r1lark View Post
        Dan, were these a 'drop in' replacement, or was there some type of modification involved?
        Paul ... If your question about "drop-in" replacements was about the valve stem seals then the Fel Pro SS72683 seals are for a Ford 2.3L 4 Cylinder and will work on Studebaker V8's. You will need to order 2 sets as the 2.3L set only has 8 seals and you will need 16 seals for both the intake and exhaust valve stems. I believe there is another Ford V8 (maybe a 302) that will work too but I think the intake and exhaust seals are slightly different. The 2.3L 4 cylinder is a more modern engine so you should be getting a seal constructed using the latest in technology. Here's a clip from Federal-Mogul (Fel Pro) website describing their valve stem seals:

        Goetze valve stem seals are specifically selected to deliver controlled amounts of oil down the guide to lubricate the valve without allowing excessive amounts to reach the combustion chamber. Goetze offers quality deflector and positive guide type valve stem seals made of FPM, nitrile or polyacrylate. All valve stem seals offer:

        Reduced oil consumption
        Reduced exhaust emissions
        Less spark plug fouling
        Decreased risk of seals breaking up
        sigpic
        John
        63R-2386
        Resto-Mod by Michael Myer

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by dpson View Post
          I recently swaped in a used engine in my 62 Lark V-8 and it smoked quite badly on start up. The replacement engine had been sitting for well over five, and probably many more, years. Based on advice from the forum I fed an engine cleaner (Seafoam) down the carb while running, feathering the throttle, and that seemed to help quite a bit (stuck rings). I drove the car in the parade of a local show (Stowe, VT) last Saturday and it still smoked during acceleration from stop, which was a little embarasing in front of the crowd that lined the street at the reviewing stand. It probably didn't give our mark a great name, especailly since the 59 Lark V-8 in front of me did the same thing. Anyway when I got home I replaced the valve seals with the modern F*rd (FELPRO SS 72683) seals (again based on recommendations from the forum) and that cured the smoking problem. The old seals had the consistency of hard plastic and would shatter in pieces when tapped with a hammer.

          I realize this isn't the cure-all for all engine smoking issues, but for engines that have been sitting for a while this seemed to work well and didn't cost a ton of money.
          You could also stop the smoking by using synthetic. As an added plus, continued engine wear would be significantly reduced. A friend of mine has 280,000 miles on his pick-up truck, has never used anything but synthetic oil, and uses a quart of oil every 6000 miles~!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by dpson View Post
            I recently swaped in a used engine in my 62 Lark V-8 and it smoked quite badly on start up. The replacement engine had been sitting for well over five, and probably many more, years. Based on advice from the forum I fed an engine cleaner (Seafoam) down the carb while running, feathering the throttle, and that seemed to help quite a bit (stuck rings). I drove the car in the parade of a local show (Stowe, VT) last Saturday and it still smoked during acceleration from stop, which was a little embarasing in front of the crowd that lined the street at the reviewing stand. It probably didn't give our mark a great name, especailly since the 59 Lark V-8 in front of me did the same thing. Anyway when I got home I replaced the valve seals with the modern F*rd (FELPRO SS 72683) seals (again based on recommendations from the forum) and that cured the smoking problem. The old seals had the consistency of hard plastic and would shatter in pieces when tapped with a hammer.

            I realize this isn't the cure-all for all engine smoking issues, but for engines that have been sitting for a while this seemed to work well and didn't cost a ton of money.
            Old seals and plastic parts simply deteriorate with heat and age. I had a 1988 560SL that had plastic cam oilers. When I had them and the cam tension checked, the oilers simply disintegrated. The Ford type are more than adequate for the use our Studebakers will see. Beyond normal use and for hi perf use, the Perfect Circle teflon seals are the way to go. They will require removing and machining the head.

            Comment


            • #7
              I also used the Ford valve seals. After having done so, my oil usage went UP. It turns out, according to a Studebaker machine shop that the Ford valve seals like a TAPERED valve guide to fit over. The Stude valve guides are not tapered, so the seals work their way up, and leak.

              I have NOT gone back in to replace mine or double check the real facts. I will probably replace mine with stock when I pull the engine for a full rebuild and upgrade to 289.

              FWIW.....
              Dis-Use on a Car is Worse Than Mis-Use...
              1959 Studebaker Lark VIII 2DHTP

              Comment


              • #8
                So that brings up a question that has puzzled me for a while. Do the Studebaker V-8 valve seals sit in place and the valves slide through them, or do the seals move up and down on the valve stems while the valves are in motion?
                RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

                17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
                10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
                10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
                4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
                5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
                56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
                60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by RadioRoy View Post
                  So that brings up a question that has puzzled me for a while. Do the Studebaker V-8 valve seals sit in place and the valves slide through them, or do the seals move up and down on the valve stems while the valves are in motion?
                  The seals on the SBC's as well as the Studes SHOULD have the valve sliding up and down in the seal. The seal needs to stay in place on the top of the valve guide. There is an installation sleeve that came with the Ford seals that I called a valve stem condom because it protected the new seal from being cut while installing the seal over the valve stem. Such a handy item that I kept them for future use on all other engines I will be doing.....
                  Dis-Use on a Car is Worse Than Mis-Use...
                  1959 Studebaker Lark VIII 2DHTP

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thank you.
                    RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

                    17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
                    10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
                    10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
                    4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
                    5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
                    56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
                    60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have some of those. Looks like half a medicine capsule, and I wonder if those could work too. Plus the antihistimine residue should help dry up oil leaks too!

                      Originally posted by BILT4ME View Post
                      The seals on the SBC's as well as the Studes SHOULD have the valve sliding up and down in the seal. The seal needs to stay in place on the top of the valve guide. There is an installation sleeve that came with the Ford seals that I called a valve stem condom because it protected the new seal from being cut while installing the seal over the valve stem. Such a handy item that I kept them for future use on all other engines I will be doing.....
                      Ron Dame
                      '63 Champ

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The stock Studebaker valve stem seals move up and down with the valve. They are an oil deflector to keep excess oil away from the valve guide and stem. They work as intended if the valve guide and valve stem don't have excess clearance allowing too much oil to go down the guide. I don't like a positive type valve guide seal as they allow almost no oil to go down the guide which will accelerate wear on both the guide and the valve stem. I use umbrella type seals on my engines and I don't have a problem with oil consumption. Bud

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          No wonder I am puzzled.
                          RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

                          17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
                          10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
                          10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
                          4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
                          5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
                          56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
                          60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

                          Comment

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