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Engine Swap 1962 Lark Advice

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  • Engine Swap 1962 Lark Advice

    I've decided to pull the V8 (V-554095) w/automatic transmission rebuilt by the previous owner that has low oil pressure issues and swap in a running 1962 259 V8 (V-536837) to make this a car that can be driven without concern for engine damage. In reviewing previous posts I understand that this can be done with out removing the engine support crossmember and with the front clip in place. Any words of wisdom (things to watch out for) with the swap would be appreacaited.

    I've attached photos of the engines.
    Attached Files
    Dan Peterson
    Montpelier, VT
    1960 Lark V-8 Convertible
    1960 Lark V-8 Convertible (parts car)

  • #2
    I'd get a helper, and consider removing the hood before you start. You'll have to pull it out at a pretty severe angle (nose up) and some assistance getting the tailshaft over the grille will be helpful. Might be easier if you pulled the radiator and water manifold before starting.

    nate
    --
    55 Commander Starlight
    http://members.cox.net/njnagel

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks Nate,
      I plan on pulling the radiator. One question, when I pulled the running 1962 engine with the crossmember removed a lot of transmission fluid came out of the tail shaft. Should the transmission be drained or should I insert a flange back into the tranny to hold most of the fluid back?
      Dan Peterson
      Montpelier, VT
      1960 Lark V-8 Convertible
      1960 Lark V-8 Convertible (parts car)

      Comment


      • #4
        if you're concerned about making a mess, definitely plug the tailshaft either with a spare slip yoke or some kind of plug. If you can drain the trans, and are planning on changing the fluid anyway, that isn't a bad idea either.

        nate
        --
        55 Commander Starlight
        http://members.cox.net/njnagel

        Comment


        • #5
          Pull the bell crank - throttle linkage down to the pedal. Don't forget to at least pop the dist cap and rotor. I usually pull the distributor.
          Gordon

          Comment


          • #6
            For sure pull the radiator and the radiator support, but my own experience & opinion is also pull the front bumper & front end panel. This way you dont have to pull the engine out on a severe angle and you may not have to remove the hood. If you do have to remove the hood, first drill a 1/8 hole in the hinge thru into the hood mounting area so when you go to reassemble it, you will have a location hole for an ice pick or similar tool to locate its original position. This is what I did a few years ago when I had to replace the clutch in my Champ. Since it has the granny gear 4 speed and weighs a "ton" I didnt want to try to remove it by itself but pulled it out as an assembly with the engine. Good time too to make sure those water passages are nice & clear & install some brass freeze plugs while your at it. Let us know what you decided & how it turned out!
            59 Lark wagon, now V-8, H.D. auto!
            60 Lark convertible V-8 auto
            61 Champ 1/2 ton 4 speed
            62 Champ 3/4 ton 5 speed o/drive
            62 Champ 3/4 ton auto
            62 Daytona convertible V-8 4 speed & 62 Cruiser, auto.
            63 G.T. Hawk R-2,4 speed
            63 Avanti (2) R-1 auto
            64 Zip Van
            66 Daytona Sport Sedan(327)V-8 4 speed
            66 Cruiser V-8 auto

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            • #7
              Dang dang dang Vermont is a little too far away... would love to get ahold of a V8 to rebuild and have as spare... or go into my 6 car... (based on the wild assumption the old engine would be for sale :-) )
              Last edited by Steven and Michelle; 06-06-2010, 12:06 AM.

              Comment


              • #8
                I understand that everyone has their priorities and reasons for doing things and this advice is a bit late, but if I read this right the current Engine is that clean beautifully detailed maybe FULL FLOW late '62 Engine in disguise (with wrong Valve covers and V/C Paint Color) and you are replacing it with a used, unknown condition partial flow Engine?

                If that is correct, from my experiences, I would go the other way and rebuild what you have for a better long term result than using that used partial flow engine. If this is a temporary fix, and you plan to keep the existing Engine to rebuild later, that is a good plan. Just don't put it off too far, when Parts get well over $2000.00 to do it.
                Good luck with your swap.
                StudeRich
                Second Generation Stude Driver,
                Proud '54 Starliner Owner

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hi Dan, I would for sure pull the nose panel off and then the complete unit slides out fairly level.and a one man operation at that,that's how I did my Champ swap and went very smooth and fast! hey are you gonna be at Sturbridge in August?
                  Joseph R. Zeiger

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    First, I want to thank everyone for the advice and encouragement. In response to some of the questions; both engines are partial flow. The engine in the car was rebuilt but has almost no oil pressure at hot idle. I've checked the easy items such as the galley plug in the distributor opening, oil pressure relief valve, etc. so it's time to pull it out and take it apart. The advice about the freeze plugs was great and now is the time to remove them while the engine is out so I'm going to work on these today (a good rainy day project). I am also replacing one of the exhaust manifolds, it has a chunk broken out where one of the exhaust pipe flange studs was and was cobbed together with a machine screw that obviously didn't work very well (see photos). I also will probably pull the front clip, it seems like that will make the swap that much easier.

                    Joe,
                    I plan on going to Sturbridge in August so I'll see you there. By the way the Tri-Spokes chapter is getting together at the Manchester, VT car show next weekend and if you get a chance you might want to take a drive up.
                    Attached Files
                    Dan Peterson
                    Montpelier, VT
                    1960 Lark V-8 Convertible
                    1960 Lark V-8 Convertible (parts car)

                    Comment

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