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  • JDP
    replied
    Originally posted by sweetolbob View Post
    John

    Because you are actively involved in this technology, What is the usual amperage of the charger you use on parts like the trunk latch? Thx

    Bob

    It's only drawing 3-4 amp right now so it's on a small charger. Set it as high as you like, the size of the part determines the current draw. i.e. a cylinder head may draw 20 amps or more with a big anode. You can even derust the inside of a gas tank by just filling it with the solution and suspending the anode away from tank sides.

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  • sweetolbob
    replied
    John

    Because you are actively involved in this technology, What is the usual amperage of the charger you use on parts like the trunk latch? Thx

    Bob

    Leave a comment:


  • JDP
    replied
    Originally posted by bams50 View Post
    This has alway seemed neat, but really just a gimmick to me. Why is it better/easier/quicker than just using any of the multitude of other methods?
    Certainly not a gimmick to me. Cost less then $5.00, gets rid of rust in any area that the liquid can get to, and requires very little labor. I have a Avanti trunk latch cooking as we speak.

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  • jclary
    replied
    I wonder if using a battery in conjunction to the battery charger would protect the charger. Many of the chargers will burn up if turned on without a load. I have a charger with instructions to turn off the charger before disconnecting from the battery.

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  • dictator27
    replied
    This method is also environmentally friendly. The crud that results can be used to green up your lawn.

    Terry

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  • T-CAB
    replied
    Thanks for the replies. I will remove the gunk from the 2 rebars that I have attached. The buildup may expain why it is now so slow. I also like the advice about the beer! Will add a few beer nuts into the mix as well!


    T-cab

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  • Jeff_H
    replied
    I've cleaned lots of small parts and bolts, etc with A&H washing soda and a battery charger. The biggest problem seems to be the electrode stuck in the bucket collects all the crud that comes off the part and then the current drops off. Reaction slows way down as you would expect. To keep things going faster requires pulling out that electrode and scraping the gunk off frequently. I usually use scraps of old sheet metal or other junk for the electrode as it slowly gets eaten up. One time I used a coffee can to hold the solution and also be the electrode. Worked great until it became full of pin-holes and made a mess on the floor

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  • DEEPNHOCK
    replied
    I like your style...
    For those impatient people, there are better voltage sources than a battery charger..
    There was an earlier thread, and a bunch of websites where people built shallow tanks big enough for complete boat trailer frames, and car frames.
    Just be careful if you use stainless steel as one of your materials, as the gas given off is toxic...
    HTIH
    Jeff

    Some more good info is here at:
    http://tinyurl.com/elecrtolytic-rust-removal

    Originally posted by bowhawk View Post
    On the parts I've used this method on, I've found it fairly nondestructive. I use Arm and Hammer baking soda, it may be wrong but it seems to work fine for me. I find the greatest advantage is it works with a beer in you hand and sitting down in the air conditioning.

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  • bowhawk
    replied
    On the parts I've used this method on, I've found it fairly nondestructive. I use Arm and Hammer baking soda, it may be wrong but it seems to work fine for me. I find the greatest advantage is it works with a beer in you hand and sitting down in the air conditioning.

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  • royvaldez
    replied
    I have used Soda Ash. Yes it takes time for the process to work. It takes 9 full measuring container( 2 cups) of Soda Ash per 50 gallon tank.

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  • sweetolbob
    replied
    Originally posted by layrret

    Try Sodium Carbonate used to increase ph in swimming pools. I use about tablespoon per gallon of water.
    Just to be clear Washing Soda is Sodium Carbonate ( Na2CO3), Baking Soda is Sodium biCarbonate (NaHCO3). Almost double the Sodium ion level with Washing Soda. Unless there are other differences 2X Baking soda should be close 1X washing soda. Both are weak bases.

    Bob

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  • bams50
    replied
    This has alway seemed neat, but really just a gimmick to me. Why is it better/easier/quicker than just using any of the multitude of other methods?

    Leave a comment:


  • JDP
    replied
    Originally posted by leyrret View Post
    Try Sodium Carbonate used to increase ph in swimming pools. I use about tablespoon per gallon of water. I did the tank thing on my car body. Used
    several bags of the stuff.
    A pool and a welder instead of a battery charger will do the job, but don't let the dog or anyone nearby with the power on.

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  • leyrret
    replied
    Try Sodium Carbonate used to increase ph in swimming pools. I use about tablespoon per gallon of water. I did the tank thing on my car body. Used
    several bags of the stuff.

    Leave a comment:


  • silverhawk
    replied
    Depending on what dipping a car commercially costs, it may be worth looking into building a temporary tank. Would be interesting!

    Leave a comment:

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