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  • Good news or bad news?

    Just got back from the first short trip in the '62 GT Hawk. Seemed a little sluggish when accelerating up to 20 MPH. Past 20 and it seemed better. When I got home I punched the "go" pedal in the garage. Rusty water (condensation) came out of the passenger side exhaust and small bits of carbon came out of the drivers side. Is this good news or bad news?
    Peter Bishop
    Director,
    Northeast Zone

  • #2
    My guess (unencumbered by the thought process) is that you have an exhaust leak on the right side. Maybe a bad exhaust manifold gasket, a cracked manifold, rust holes in the exhaust pipe, etc.
    John
    1950 Champion
    W-3 4 Dr. Sedan
    Holdrege NE

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    • #3
      That, or you just have not driven it far enough. For every gallon of real gasoline burned, one gallon of water in the form of vapor is produced. You have to get the exhaust up to temp to boil the water out of the pipe. A short trip is not good for any vehicle.

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      • #4
        Make sure your heat riser on the right exhaust manifold is free and opening when hot.
        Frank van Doorn
        Omaha, Ne.
        1962 GT Hawk 289 4 speed
        1941 Champion streetrod, R-2 Powered, GM 200-4R trans.
        1952 V-8 232 Commander State "Starliner" hardtop OD

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        • #5
          My 58 Hawk does the same thing if I don't drive it. I have spots on my garage floor just like yours.
          If I drive it and get it up to normal operating temp, that doesn't happen.

          Joe D.

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          • #6
            Thanks guys. After all we are members of the Studebaker DRIVERS Club so I had better DRIVE it more.
            Peter Bishop
            Director,
            Northeast Zone

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            • #7
              Pete, Chuck is on the money. I think most exhaust systems rust from the inside-out, just for that reason. The exhaust needs to get more than idle, as in driving, and for more than around a block, to completely dry out and purge the moisture. And as today's fuels continue to be degraded, this will only increase.

              To me, the best thing is to start a car and let it run for a minute or two; then get out on the road for a few miles. Then I get it up to highway speed for at least a couple miles minimum. Don't tell anybody, but every so often I like tromp on the pedal, kick it down to passing gear, and hold it there... awhile <wink> You'll keep the exhaust system dry and clean, and save mountains of trouble from carbon building up and breaking loose in chunks.

              As an added bonus, GTs look like they belong at high speed. Make sure that hood is secure and set 'er off!

              And a side note- if you get pulled over, act innocent. Don't bail out and agitate the cop like you did to me when we got back from SB <GG>

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              • #8
                Do you really think I agitated him?
                Peter Bishop
                Director,
                Northeast Zone

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                • #9
                  So true, about driving long enough!! I used to get to go with my dad to pick up customers Studebakers and a great many times, he would say "it only needs the dust blowed out of it". He was usually right. A lot of the folks that had the cars were a bit older, or lived in the city and just didn't run them enough to keep the mess off the plugs, the points from corroding, or carbon off the valves. This is where I learned that sometimes a good tune-up consisted of a good brisk drive and a bit of Liquid Wrench poured down the carb while idling and revving it up to keep it from dying while dripping in the Liquid Wrench. Miss those times, I loved hanging out at the dealership with dad and the guys. John

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                  • #10
                    Peter, go for a nice long cruise in that beautiful car and take your digital camera with so that you can photograph your car near your area's local attractions. Then report back here and share those photos!
                    sigpic
                    In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

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                    • #11
                      Seen many vehicles brought in to the shop because they run like crap.
                      Take them out for a good half hour hone in an area where you know there are no radar traps and charge the customer $60.
                      Everyone's happy!
                      "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                      Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                      Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                      '33 Rockne 10,
                      '51 Commander Starlight,
                      '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée",
                      '56 Sky Hawk

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by PeterHawk View Post
                        Do you really think I agitated him?
                        Uh- yeah. Ask Matt

                        Just a little though. It only took a minute for my natural charm to win him over.

                        Thank Heaven for charisma!

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                        • #13
                          There was an R-2 Avanti in Asheville NC when I was growing up that came in to a local shop regularly for a tune-up. Usually consisted of a good hot hiway run and it was cured. Similarly we have a 1 ton flatbed truck that delivers packages around the campus where I work. It rarely ever leaves the campus, therefore hardly ever sees above 20 MPH. Every time I use it I make a point of driving it out the gates and standing in it for the 1/2 mile or so to return it. Its regular driver always comments on how much better the truck runs for several days after I drive it. Just make sure you watch your temp guage and oil to be certain your water is not blowing off the top of the motor (head, head gasket, maybe intake or gasket as I believe water runs through them on the Stude).Good Luck, Steve
                          sigpic

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                          • #14
                            Minimum of 20 minutes AFTER the temp gauge reads normal.

                            Terry

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                            • #15
                              Hi all,

                              If you want to avoid condensation phenomens in your exhausts, just drill a little hole (3/16 " will do) at the lowest part on the muffler. Don't go further the first metal sheet. You'll be amazed of the quantity of water coming of that little hole when the wheather is cold. You also have chances to find water when drilling.
                              sigpic

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