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Oil burping out filler pipe

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  • Oil burping out filler pipe

    I don't know if the problem is with the Stude or its dumb owner. At higher rpms my newly rebuilt 289 V8 is intermittently spewing oil out the filler pipe. This is a 1960ish partial flow block, with the filler pipe at the front, and a screw-on filter mounted next to the filler pipe, feeding into the base of the filler pipe. There is a PCV valve screwed into the top of the valley cover. The valve covers are solid, with no venting.

    The first problem I discovered is that the engine rebuilder (not me, I'm just the dumb owner) had installed a PCV valve with the wrong flow, toward the valley cover instead of the carb. I have now installed a pipe fitting in the valley cover, and an inline generic PCV valve flowing to the carb. This seems to solve most of the problem, but I still get the odd burp of oil.

    I have a Holley 670 cfm 4 barrel carb installed. Initially I didn't have the instructions for the Holley carb, but I do now and I just discovered that I had the PCV hose hooked up to the power brake input in the carb, not the PCV hook up. I've corrected that. I haven't seen more oil, but it only happened intermittently anyway.

    Do you guys think that will fix the problem? Or is the power brake hookup just another vacuum into the carb?



    John
    1953 Commander Coupe
    1954 Champion Sedan
    John
    1953 Commander Coupe
    1954 Champion Sedan
    1963 Lark

  • #2
    John; I am sure you did not actually get a "BURP" of oil, right? As in one big burp all at once! It normally just slowly "sprays" a mist of oil over time and miles, not instantly. But then with every thing "wrong" who knows! It sounds like you have the problems fixed except I would wonder how much flow that aftermarket PCV valve has, compared to the original Carter PCV, it could be sized wrong for a 289.

    The reason you don't want the PCV connected to the intake runner is that the unburned gases and later with more wear, a bit of oil will all be drawn into number 7 cyl. it is way better to feed all 8 evenly. The carb. port should be on the engine side of the throttle plates.

    The straight aluminum filler pipe used on '61-'62 seems in my opinion, to be less baffled than the somewhat "curvy" '55-'60 cast iron one, which did tend to blow more oil out. You would have to use a fuel pump block-off plate if you used your old '51-'54 Pipe, better to get the one without the fuel pump hole, '55-'60. A good clean, new, breathing type oil cap will also help.

    Actually I think you will find it's OK now, you will need to do some Interstate Fwy. runs to find out! [^] It is important however, NOT to run the engine at a constant RPM over 2800-3000 especially on break-in. If it will not cruise at 2400-2600 or less at 65-70, then you need different Trans. and or Rear End gears.

    StudeRich
    Studebakers Northwest
    Ferndale, WA
    StudeRich
    Second Generation Stude Driver,
    Proud '54 Starliner Owner

    Comment


    • #3
      StudeRich:

      Thanks for your thoughts. I think it was more of a spray/drip out the holes around the filler cap. It didn't blow the cap off, or anything like that. I think the generic PCV valve will be okay - I asked for one that could handle a V8 with a 4 barrel carb. It appears to have lots of flow to it... we'll see.

      I'll be cautious on the break in. I have OD so I can keep the revs down, and I should be able to avoid prolonged runs at high rpm.

      John
      1953 Commander Coupe
      1954 Champion Sedan
      John
      1953 Commander Coupe
      1954 Champion Sedan
      1963 Lark

      Comment


      • #4
        Does your oil filler stand have the half baffle plate in it?
        Jeff[8D]


        quote:Originally posted by jngregory

        I don't know if the problem is with the Stude or its dumb owner. At higher rpms my newly rebuilt 289 V8 is intermittently spewing oil out the filler pipe. This is a 1960ish partial flow block, with the filler pipe at the front, and a screw-on filter mounted next to the filler pipe, feeding into the base of the filler pipe. There is a PCV valve screwed into the top of the valley cover. The valve covers are solid, with no venting.

        The first problem I discovered is that the engine rebuilder (not me, I'm just the dumb owner) had installed a PCV valve with the wrong flow, toward the valley cover instead of the carb. I have now installed a pipe fitting in the valley cover, and an inline generic PCV valve flowing to the carb. This seems to solve most of the problem, but I still get the odd burp of oil.
        I have a Holley 670 cfm 4 barrel carb installed. Initially I didn't have the instructions for the Holley carb, but I do now and I just discovered that I had the PCV hose hooked up to the power brake input in the carb, not the PCV hook up. I've corrected that. I haven't seen more oil, but it only happened intermittently anyway.
        Do you guys think that will fix the problem? Or is the power brake hookup just another vacuum into the carb?


        DEEPNHOCK at Gmail.com
        Brooklet, Georgia
        '37 Coupe Express (never ending project)
        '37 Coupe Express Trailer (project)
        '61 Hawk (project)
        http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock

        HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

        Jeff


        Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



        Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

        Comment


        • #5
          Deepnhock - yes, there is a half baffle in the filler pipe.

          John
          1953 Commander Coupe
          1954 Champion Sedan
          John
          1953 Commander Coupe
          1954 Champion Sedan
          1963 Lark

          Comment


          • #6
            John, I'd get a few miles on it before worrying too much. Get those rings seated a bit.
            Are you using the early, four-nut valve covers or the later, two-nut style? Reason I ask is you could opt to put one of the later style covers on that has a filler cap incorporated. This would help relieve some of that pressure. R3-R4 engines had FOUR breather caps PLUS PCV/pan venting![:0]

            Miscreant adrift in
            the BerStuda Triangle


            1957 Transtar 1/2ton
            1960 Larkvertible V8
            1958 Provincial wagon
            1953 Commander coupe

            No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

            Comment

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