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  • jpvill4th
    replied
    "I think its 800 rpm out of gear, and 650 rpm in gear for an auto?? Set your parking brake and block the wheels."


    I think you may be correct on this. Ted suggested that I do this with my OHV6 Lark and it seemed strange when I consulted the shop manual (shop manual is not clear with automatic equipped cars), but I have changed it in this fashion - setting the idle with it in drive and it has made a big difference. The OHV6 engines I have had have always had a bit of a lope at idle and under load but not moving which I think may have something to do with the intake manifold runner lengths.

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  • PlainBrownR2
    replied
    Another source for the "bucking". This will probably appear in the glass fuel filter as a lack of fuel or a great deal of sediment. If there is any sediment in the tank, and it gets into the line, it will plug the line, thereby starving the car of fuel. This also happens if you run out of gas(dont ask how I know this ). The sloshing of the fuel will cause the car to buck and surge.
    With the former, its a simple matter of popping the line off of the tank. There should be a pinkie diameter stream of fuel coming out of the tank. If its only a trickle or none at all, the outlet is plugged. I solved this by sealing the fill hole and running compressed air, into the fill hole to push the sediment out of the tank. That and maybed using some pipe cleaners to clear the outlet. Haven't had any problems with this since then.


    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
    1950 Studebaker 2R5 with 170 turbocharged
    [img=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00003.jpg?t=1171152673[/img=left]
    [img=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00009.jpg?t=1171153019[/img=right]
    [img=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00002.jpg?t=1171153180[/img=left]
    [img=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00005.jpg?t=1171153370[/img=right]

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  • 1961HAWK
    replied
    http://www.chevyhiperformance.com/howto/45638/

    here is a good site on setting idle mixture.
    if anybody wants it.

    Erin Hays
    1961 Hawk
    1962 Lark
    1963 Wagonaire

    Leave a comment:


  • sbca96
    replied
    The bore spacing and size is different between the WCFB and the 600
    CFM Edelbrock carb. The linkage requires a spacer as mentioned. The
    bolt pattern is the same as mentioned. I think that the 500 cfm is
    similar to the WCFB, but I am not positive. To use the Edelbrock (or
    the Studebaker Carter AFB) on a WCFB manifold, you should have the 4
    holes bored out to improve flow. Or you can end up with some jetting
    issues and drivablity problems. One of the best upgrades I did to my
    60 Hawk was going to an AFB (from a junkyard Caddy), and than later
    to an Edelbrock AFB.

    Tom

    Leave a comment:


  • 1961HAWK
    replied
    an eldelbrock fits on the wcfb intake no big problems. it uses the inner bolt holes on the carb.you need a small spacer under the carb to get the linkage to clear. and will have to drill out the mount hole alittle where your linkage bolts on. i run one on my lark and used my wcfb intake until the hawk needed it. then had a two barrell intake modified for the lark.
    it is possible you have float issue. a pinhole in a brass float will gradually get worse over time letting the carb over fuel.
    so be cure to check your floats well when rebuilding.

    Erin Hays
    1961 Hawk
    1962 Lark
    1963 Wagonaire

    Leave a comment:


  • N8N
    replied
    WCFB to AFB is not a bolt on, the bolt pattern on the carb baseplate is different. Jeff Rice is your man for AFB intakes, if he's back up and running yet.

    good luck

    nate

    --
    55 Commander Starlight
    http://members.cox.net/njnagel

    Leave a comment:


  • MagikDraggin
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by showbizkid

    Sounds like time for a carb rebuild for sure - that's easy. But the bucking... that sure sounds like a partially clogged exhaust system to me. I've experienced that symptom many time with various cars, and it's always turned out to be clogged mufflers (or catalytics, with newer vehicles).

    If it was me, I'd take the car to my friendly local muffler shop and ask them to inspect the system.


    Clark in San Diego
    Okie-dokie, a carb rebuild it will be. Hope that helps. Regarding the exhaust system, I have already had both turbo mufflers replaced due to clogging and collapsed baffles inside.

    My intuition tells me the "bucking" is electrical in nature, but so far I've been unable to locate the cause.

    Has anyone replaced that old WCFB carb with a newer style Edelbrock/Carter AFB, and if so, is it a difficult modification and worth the time, effort and money?

    Thanks to all for the helpful input so far. I'm gettin' there, "one piece at a time", heh.

    Karl


    1962 GT Hawk 4sp

    Leave a comment:


  • mapman
    replied
    Also check your spark advance systems. Both mechanical and vacuum. Make sure there is no leak in the vacuum advance or hose. check to see that it advances correctly and holds as engine speed increases.
    Rob

    Leave a comment:


  • showbizkid
    replied
    Sounds like time for a carb rebuild for sure - that's easy. But the bucking... that sure sounds like a partially clogged exhaust system to me. I've experienced that symptom many time with various cars, and it's always turned out to be clogged mufflers (or catalytics, with newer vehicles).

    If it was me, I'd take the car to my friendly local muffler shop and ask them to inspect the system.


    [img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

    Clark in San Diego
    '63 F2/Lark Standard
    http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

    Leave a comment:


  • MagikDraggin
    replied
    Man, if it ain't one thing it's another. I managed to check out the distributor. Points are new; cap is new; rotor is ehhh, ok, but not fantastic; plug wires are new.

    No play in shaft, dwell is right on the money and a steady reading. Timing is right on the "mark". Was suprised that there are no BTDC and ATDC markings on the crank pulley. I guess they wanted it timed right on that little mark and that's it.

    Anyway, while test driving the rascal, I noticed when accelerating moderately through the gears, when I was in 3rd gear about 2800 rpm, the power went down as if one or two spark plugs had suddenly fouled out and began misfiring.

    I let up on the gas momentarily and then went back to accelerating and all was well again. It does this every once in a while....not every time. I also notice that while in first gear, and slowly accelerating, sometimes the motor will suddenly "buck", as though just for an instant, all spark shut off, then came right back on again.

    I re-inspected the insides of the distr, thinking it might be a bare spot on the secondary wire grounding out when the mech adv plate moved and found no problems.

    I'm at a loss here as to what I should be looking for. Any ideas from some of the resident experts?

    Oh and also, after shutting the engine off, I noticed a rather strong gasoline smell, and found that fuel was "hissing" into the intake manifold from the carb jets. Would this be a carb problem or something caused by excessive fuel pump pressure? (could possibly be part of the reason I have so much black sooty carbon being blown out of the tailpipe at start up, as well as the rotten fuel mileage I am getting).

    Checked spark plugs and while they were showing signs of carbon buildup (rich mixture) and were gapped at .042, there was no signs of anything else amiss....and I regapped them at .035 before reinstalling them. The peculiar misfiring problem was still there, as well as the off and on "bucking" at lower speeds.

    I am really trying hard to get this Hawk ready to make the trip to South Bend in June, but it seems like the more things I fix, the more things I find need fixin'.

    All suggestions appreciated.

    Karl


    1962 GT Hawk 4sp

    Leave a comment:


  • 1961HAWK
    replied
    It can be done either way. The use of vacuum gage takes out some guess work. if you set your carb to peak vacuum. it is functioning at its best.
    you should try it a couple times. you will find it is a very easy and accurate way to set a carb.


    Erin Hays
    1961 Hawk
    1962 Lark
    1963 Wagonaire

    Leave a comment:


  • Roscomacaw
    replied
    "In the old days when I used to do this sort of stuff, I recall that the screws are to be turned clockwise, until the idle begins to drop (50 rpm) and then turned back counterclockwise 1/2 turn.

    Is that how Studebaker intended for their WCFB carbs to be adjusted? "

    Yes. Engine must be FULLY warmed - idle adjust screw turned back completely. Engine SHOULD be able to idle like this even if a bit roughly.
    Then do the mixture adj screws as you decribe above. first one - then the other. then repeat at least once to prove that they're both at optimum.
    MY rule of thumb with a carb that I've never adjusted is to turn the two mixture screws in until they bottom - being careful NOT to tighten them TIGHT! - just tighten them until you realize they've reached bottom. Then turn them out, at least two full turns before warming the engine and doing the final tweak as mentioned above.
    Once you have the mixture screws set, go back and turn the idle adj screw in until you bring the idle up to the RPM you're happy with.

    Miscreant adrift in
    the BerStuda Triangle


    1957 Transtar 1/2ton
    1960 Larkvertible V8
    1958 Provincial wagon
    1953 Commander coupe

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    also check dwell angle about 29 degrees to 31 wwhich gives you the proper points gap eg. i did but points had to be 12 thou but i put in a new dizzy and then to get 30 degrees the points become 18 thou you see wear and tear othe wise wats been said above wouldnt be far wrong by the other guys pete

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  • 1961HAWK
    replied
    I always use a vacuum gage. set to peak vacuum works easy and you aren't waiting to hear the engine respond. it was also let you know if you have low vacuum from a possilbe leak or tight valves.


    Erin Hays
    1961 Hawk
    1962 Lark
    1963 Wagonaire

    Leave a comment:


  • Alan
    replied
    What we used to do for a bad exhaust valve check was to put a piece of paper at one side of the pipe. If there was a bad valve it would suck the paper back toward the pipe, it would slap. Hard to tell by hand.

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