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OEM partial flow oil filter opinion poll

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  • 55s
    replied
    I'm afraid I also put on a close but incorrect gasket on my 55 Commander. Only one quart of oil makes a lot of mess.

    Paul R

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  • 53k
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by Mr.Biggs

    The last one I did, I put steel lines on the filter. Some things, you can improve upon.

    This 75K Champion engine that I recently pulled the pan off of - it had an inch deep layer of grud (Grunge-Mud)in the well of the pan! Would a filter have avoided some of that? Hard to say - not knowing the history of the car and how it was serviced. But I'd bet it would have. Of course, the type of oil used and the frequency of change could have had a bearing as well.

    Truth is, I've got an early V8 that's been rebuilt and I'm gonna install it without a filter. We'll see how it goes....
    My first new car, a '61 Cruiser did not have a filter. I drove it 65,000 trouble-free miles before trading it on my Wagonaire. In those days, if you didn't have a filter, you simply changed your oil every 1,000 miles (and you were supposed to grease them every 1,000 miles too).

    Paul Johnson
    '53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
    '64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
    '64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
    Museum R-4 engine

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  • N8N
    replied
    Dan,

    I had a canister on my '62 that I believe was the factory Walker-made HD filter option (it fit right on the early '62 filler stack) and the gaskets supplied with the cartridges do not fit that lid.

    ISTR but it's been a while, that the gaskets supplied *do* work with the Fram-made canisters on earlier cars.

    nate

    --
    55 Commander Starlight
    62 Daytona hardtop
    http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel

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  • Laemmle
    replied
    Nate,

    Go to a good graphic arts house in your town or a large town near you...they usually carry a full supply of drafting tools artistic supplies ect..here in NYC such items are common.

    Leave a comment:


  • studegary
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by Mr.Biggs

    OK, were these filters a delete option on Studes or were they standard?
    Bob/MrBiggs - They were never a "delete option." They were standard for some years and optional for other years. For examples;
    1948-1949 a large capacity oil cleaner was standard,
    1953 a Fram oil filter was a special equipment item, under accessories,
    1961-1962 an oil filter was an accessory.
    I didn't research to see when, between 1949 and 1953, the oil filter became optional equipment (an accessory).

    Gary L.
    1954 Commander Starliner (restomod)
    1959 DeLuxe pickup (restomod)

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  • r1lark
    replied
    Well, I was determined to stay out of this thread, because I saw this as one of those 'emotional' issues with a lot of folks, similar to the Stude engine Vs Chevy engine threads. But, since I often don't listen to the sensible side of my brain, here goes<G>!

    Gary has laid out some excellent information. In my job with a large utility company, I deal (among many other things) with oil cleanliness and oil filtration for large turbine-generator sets. For example, at my generating station, each main turbine/generator unit has a 15,000 gallon oil reservoir for bearing lubrication. This oil is kept clean by a bypass filtering system. Yes, just like a partial flow filter system, just a lot bigger. Running some quick numbers in my head, the ratio of total oil flow out of the main shaft driven pump to the bypass filter flow is very similar to the numbers Gary quoted for the automobile oil pump versus the partial flow filter.

    Yes, bypass oil filters do work, and are very effective. As someone else noted, the filtering efficiency of a filter (absolute micron size and beta ratio is how filter capability is generally expressed) can be much better on a bypass type system than a full flow system. And as Gary noted, a properly designed bypass system will filter the total gallons thru many times in 24 hours.

    So, I really believe that what we can glean from all of this discussion is that the partial flow filters ARE effective. Are they effective enough to find a partial flow system for a car that does not have one? IMHO, yes! In fact, I am doing that right now on my new '54 Champion sedan. I acquired a partial flow oil filter from a fellow member, and I am in the process of installing it right now.

    Paul (my opinion, for what it's worth) Warta


    Paul

    Visit The Studebaker Skytop Registry website at: http://hometown.aol.com/r1skytop/myhomepage/index.html

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  • ROADRACELARK
    replied
    Nate,
    Don't those cartridge filters come with a lid gasket and the small flat rubber washer for under the element?[?] IIRC, the last Fram I bought had those in the box.
    Dan

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  • Roscomacaw
    replied
    OK, were these filters a delete option on Studes or were they standard? For the couple of bucks difference (and yes, a couple of bucks went lots further in the 50s)why were they not on every Stude that left the factory? Certainly by the 50s, enough evidence was at hand to prove the value given all the testy-monials and "proof" offered here.[}]
    I've come across enough Studes in my 33 years of playing with them that DIDN'T have filters on them or evidence that they'd ever HAD filters on them.
    I'm not here to say they're a BAD thing, but this is another one of those cases where it's made to sound like you're flirting with disaster if you don't have one on your Stude.
    Most of our pampered babies see only a mere FRACTION of the miles they would've seen when they were bought new and used for honest-to-gosh daily transportation - not just to the office on Fridays if the weather's right. We have better oils and fewer miles. Changing your oil at regular intervals will do more than a filter can ever hope to do.
    That's OK, I'm used to being behind the ->[8]

    Miscreant at large.

    1957 Transtar 1/2ton
    1960 Larkvertible V8
    1958 Provincial wagon
    1953 Commander coupe
    1957 President 2-dr
    1955 President State
    1951 Champion Biz cpe
    1963 Daytona project FS

    Leave a comment:


  • N8N
    replied
    Been there, done that, on a '56 Golden Hawk... what a mess. Also it seems to be near impossible to get new gaskets for those lids, is there such a thing as a little tool that holds a razor blade or X-acto blade and will cut perfect circles in gasket paper? I seem to have a need for something like that on a regular basis.

    nate

    --
    55 Commander Starlight
    62 Daytona hardtop
    http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel

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  • garyash
    replied
    I do have a confession to make: when I put the M5 truck together and started the engine for the first time, I had neglected one small detail. I forgot to tighten the bolt on the top of the oil filter canister. That's my "experience" in knowing that a whole lot of oil goes into the filter housing - and OUT, too, when the bolt is loose. I spent days cleaning up the engine compartment!

    Gary Ash
    Dartmouth, MA
    '48 M5
    '65 Wagonaire Commander
    '63 Wagonaire Standard
    www.studegarage.com

    Leave a comment:


  • sbca96
    replied
    I think that the best way to sum this up is this :

    If you dont have the partial flow assembly for your car, then it is
    probably not worth sourcing one to add, if you find a good deal on
    one then go ahead and add it (with NEW lines).

    If you have one on your car already, make sure that the lines are in
    good shape, and keep it, since its not worth removing unless the lines
    to it are questionable in condition (remember that heat cracks CAN
    start from the inside also).

    If you have one of the later full flow, then be happy you dont have to
    worry about this issue at all.

    Tom

    Leave a comment:


  • Dick Steinkamp
    replied
    Gary,
    Quit confusing us with facts



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  • StudeRich
    replied
    Well, for all of us "common sense" thinkers, who know what we know from experience, not a high IQ, that pretty much verifys what most of us said. You cannot dispute the FACTS !! [^]Very well none Gary!
    Anyway; what do those kids at Classic Trucks know, anyway![xx(]
    Rich.

    quote:[i]
    While the partial flow filter doesn't get the particles instantaneously, it does get them eventually. While many particles do get recirculated through the pump, much of the oil just gets dumped back into the sump and doesn't get to the bearings. It makes sense to me to put the filter in!
    Gary Ash
    Dartmouth, MA
    StudeRich
    Ferndale, WA

    Leave a comment:


  • Roscomacaw
    replied
    quote:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Originally posted by gordr
    Well, for what it's worth, you can put me firmly in the #2 camp. Bypass oil filters were standard equipment on all military vehicles that I'm familiar with, and I doubt the DOD would have specified filters if they weren't expected to be effective.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------



    sbca96 says: "Currently working at a company that deals quite a lot with the DOD,
    this statement makes me chuckle."

    I'm with Tom over this statement. I've worked for too many military-industrial giants to not have seen superfluous stuff sold to unca Sam!

    Miscreant at large.

    1957 Transtar 1/2ton
    1960 Larkvertible V8
    1958 Provincial wagon
    1953 Commander coupe
    1957 President 2-dr
    1955 President State
    1951 Champion Biz cpe
    1963 Daytona project FS

    Leave a comment:


  • garyash
    replied
    www.castlebrookcorp.comhttp://www.tp410.com/http://www.studegarage.com/images/ot...lter_flow2.xls
    If you're really into the linear differential equations of how the filter cleans up the oil, see http://www-rohan.sdsu.edu/~jmahaffy/...e/linde536.htm

    While the partial flow filter doesn't get the particles instantaneously, it does get them eventually. While many particles do get recircu

    Leave a comment:

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