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OEM partial flow oil filter opinion poll

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  • OEM partial flow oil filter opinion poll

    Topic for discussion on 1951-62 Studebaker V8 with partial flow oil filter. Vote for one:

    1. The partial-flow oil filter is just a controlled leak of oil pressure. I believe the engine is better served by plugging the filter inlet and thus raising the system oil pressure. Then, just change oil every three months.

    2. The partial-flow oil filter is better than nothing and I would never recommend disconnecting it.



    PackardV8

  • #2
    If you're good about changing it every 3K miles, you don't need it. If not, can't hurt.

    Miscreant at large.

    1957 Transtar 1/2ton
    1960 Larkvertible V8
    1958 Provincial wagon
    1953 Commander coupe
    1957 President 2-dr
    1955 President State
    1951 Champion Biz cpe
    1963 Daytona project FS
    No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

    Comment


    • #3
      I lean toward item 1. I had a partial flow on the Hawk engine, after
      the rebuild I never put it back on. The reading that I did on it, was
      that it will collect dirt, and then dump it back into the engine. It
      didnt seem like it would be that effective regardless if it did that
      or not. My other fear was to have two more rubber lines that could
      cause a catastophic leak. Has anyone had the oil line to the pressure
      gauge break?? My brother did, guess how fast 6 quarts of oil can end
      up on the bottom of your hood and driveway ...... [B)]

      Tom
      '63 Avanti R1, '03 Mustang Cobra 13" front disc/98 GT rear brakes, 03 Cobra 17" wheels, GM alt, 97 Z28 leather seats, TKO 5-spd, Ported heads w/SST full flow valves.
      Check out my disc brake adapters to install 1994-2004 Mustang disc brakes on your Studebaker!!
      http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...bracket-update
      I have also written many TECH how to articles, do a search for my Forum name to find them

      Comment


      • #4
        The last one I did, I put steel lines on the filter. Some things, you can improve upon.

        This 75K Champion engine that I recently pulled the pan off of - it had an inch deep layer of grud (Grunge-Mud)in the well of the pan! Would a filter have avoided some of that? Hard to say - not knowing the history of the car and how it was serviced. But I'd bet it would have. Of course, the type of oil used and the frequency of change could have had a bearing as well.

        Truth is, I've got an early V8 that's been rebuilt and I'm gonna install it without a filter. We'll see how it goes.

        Miscreant at large.

        1957 Transtar 1/2ton
        1960 Larkvertible V8
        1958 Provincial wagon
        1953 Commander coupe
        1957 President 2-dr
        1955 President State
        1951 Champion Biz cpe
        1963 Daytona project FS
        No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

        Comment


        • #5
          Or (3) put a Franz on it and change your toilet paper every 1,000 miles.

          Comment


          • #6
            #1

            Youl'd have to drive about a million miles to actually filter much oil thru that system.

            Yea...I know some say different...but think about it... the route the oil has to take just to get to the filter...how much of it actually gets there...

            And how often each different molecule of oil will actually take that route to the filter when most of the oil is routed to the main and rod bearings, then the rockers...THEN...all the way to the front of the head.

            I'd say not much.

            Mike

            Comment


            • #7
              I removed mine and ran for 30k miles before I lost a main bearing,
              not sure if it was cause and effect or just conincidence.

              When I went through the motor I still didn't put the filter back on.
              I am pretty dilligent about changing the oil though.

              Comment


              • #8
                I definetly vote for #2 (it's better than nothing) I too also prefer the Frantz tissue paper filters, have had them on 6 or 8 Studes. with excellent sucess right from re-builds to present (43 years).
                You are NOT correct about the loss of oil pressure,though.All bi-pass type oil filters are SAE mandated to have a metered orface in the inlet casting or fitting to restrict the flow, so your concern is not valid! Rich.

                quote:Originally posted by PackardV8

                Topic for discussion on 1951-62 Studebaker V8 with partial flow oil filter. Vote for one:

                1. The partial-flow oil filter is just a controlled leak of oil pressure. I believe the engine is better served by plugging the filter inlet and thus raising the system oil pressure. Then, just change oil every three months.

                2. The partial-flow oil filter is better than nothing and I would never recommend disconnecting it.

                PackardV8
                StudeRich
                Ferndale, WA
                StudeRich
                Second Generation Stude Driver,
                Proud '54 Starliner Owner

                Comment


                • #9
                  www.studegarage.com
                  Gary Ash
                  Dartmouth, Mass.

                  '32 Indy car replica (in progress)
                  ’41 Commander Land Cruiser
                  '48 M5
                  '65 Wagonaire Commander
                  '63 Wagonaire Standard
                  web site at http://www.studegarage.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hi, Everyone, thanks for the shared opinions. Seems pretty evenly divided at this point.

                    Aside to StudeRich, FWIW, read the text, "controlled leak" is one definition of a metered orfice. The only way a partial flow filter works is bleeding off some oil pressure. Conversely, a full flow filter runs all the oil through the filter at full pressure before it goes to any bearings.

                    How's this hypothesis? On a new, tight engine, the oil pump can probably produce sufficient pressure to never miss what is bled off through the partial flow filter. On an engine with many miles on it, where the pressure is below oil pump bypass levels, every little metered orfice stopped helps keep up oil pressure. Agree or disagree?

                    thnx, jv.

                    PackardV8
                    PackardV8

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      quote:Originally posted by PackardV8

                      Hi, Everyone, thanks for the shared opinions. Seems pretty evenly divided at this point.

                      Aside to StudeRich, FWIW, read the text, "controlled leak" is one definition of a metered orfice. The only way a partial flow filter works is bleeding off some oil pressure. Conversely, a full flow filter runs all the oil through the filter at full pressure before it goes to any bearings.

                      How's this hypothesis? On a new, tight engine, the oil pump can probably produce sufficient pressure to never miss what is bled off through the partial flow filter. On an engine with many miles on it, where the pressure is below oil pump bypass levels, every little metered orfice stopped helps keep up oil pressure. Agree or disagree?

                      thnx, jv.

                      PackardV8
                      Well, for what it's worth, you can put me firmly in the #2 camp. Bypass oil filters were standard equipment on all military vehicles that I'm familiar with, and I doubt the DOD would have specified filters if they weren't expected to be effective.

                      I've seen plenty of "full-flow" engines with thick sludge, both Stude and brand X. And you know most of that sludge is composed of extremely fine particulates, and perhaps some gelled hydrocarbons. All stuff that will get through any filter. Sludge that has settled out, and become stationary really isn't that harmful. The purpose of the filters is to trap particles in the size range that can damage the engine by being abrasive. Look at the oil pickup screen on any engine. Fine sand, for example, will easily pass through it. If a little sliver of steel is shed from the distributor drive gear, say, it can easily pass through that screen and circulate through the system. Filters, either bypass or full-flow, can catch stuff like that.

                      I've read claims that the filter media in bypass filters traps smaller particles than that used in full-flow filters. I don't know if it's true, or not. If so, it might pay to add a bypass filter to engines already equipped with full-flow filters.

                      I really doubt the pressure loss from a .050" orifice would have much effect on the oil distribution in a worn engine. Remember, all the bearing points that receive oil pressure from the pump have worn to the point that THEY present a greater cross-sectional area for oil flow than they did when new. Main and rod bearings, lifter bores, rocker arms, cam bearings; they all have increased clearance, and can pass more oil flow than they did when new. In any case, it'd be very easy to check: just run a worn engine with bypass filter until it's completely warmed up, and read the idle oil pressure. Use a precision gauge if you have one, otherwise maybe mark the face of the stock gauge with a dry-erase marker. Disconnect and block the feed line to the bypass filter, and repeat. See if you can discern a difference.

                      It's not really oil pressure that keeps an engine alive, anyway, it's flow. As system pressure diminishes through wear on engine internals, flow through the fixed orifice on the filter will also diminish. But it will increase elsewhere in the engine. IN a really tired Stude V8, so much oil, in fact, can flow to the cylinder heads that they become full, and the level in the pan drops to the point the pump starts sucking air. I've seen that for myself.

                      Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
                      Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        quote:Originally posted by gordr
                        Well, for what it's worth, you can put me firmly in the #2 camp. Bypass oil filters were standard equipment on all military vehicles that I'm familiar with, and I doubt the DOD would have specified filters if they weren't expected to be effective.
                        Currently working at a company that deals quite a lot with the DOD,
                        this statement makes me chuckle.[:I]

                        I went back and forth on this issue, as I mentioned. I ended up not
                        using the filter, and to be honest, the oil stayed pretty clean. Now
                        I WOULDNT plug the filter block on a full flow engine.[]

                        Tom
                        '63 Avanti R1, '03 Mustang Cobra 13" front disc/98 GT rear brakes, 03 Cobra 17" wheels, GM alt, 97 Z28 leather seats, TKO 5-spd, Ported heads w/SST full flow valves.
                        Check out my disc brake adapters to install 1994-2004 Mustang disc brakes on your Studebaker!!
                        http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...bracket-update
                        I have also written many TECH how to articles, do a search for my Forum name to find them

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I would vote for No. 2. I feel my oil stayed cleaner with the filter hooked up and noticed no difference in pressure either way. When the engine is running take off the oil filler cap and look in and see how much oil is flowing through the filter. I thought it looked to be sufficient as far as volume.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            sigpic
                            Ross.
                            Riverside, Ca.
                            1957 Provincial X2
                            1958 Transtar

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              If Gord votes for #2...I vote for #2 ('nuff said [^])



                              Dick Steinkamp
                              Bellingham, WA

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