Announcement

Collapse

Get more Tips, Specs and Technical Data!

Did you know... this Forum is a service of the Studebaker Drivers Club? For more technical tips, specifications, history and tech data, visit the Tech Tips page at the SDC Homepage: www.studebakerdriversclub.com/tips.asp
See more
See less

37 Studebaker

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 37 Studebaker

    Well I friend came over to look at the 37 that would not start. he checked a few things, asked for a nail file !! he filed the new points. IT RUNS !! this is the 3rd set of points that would not work. Thanks to all on here that tried to help. I learned a lot. If it not been for this forum I think I would have sold it. I took me 32 years to get it done. I was ready to give up.

    Thanke to all. I will try to post some pictures of it

  • #2

    Ignition points are wonderous things..
    They need alignment.
    They need pampering.
    They like being roughed up (but only with metal)
    They like to be shocked a little, and shocked more (when they first wake up)..
    They need constant adjustment....sometimes twice a decade[:0]
    They detest bath's.
    They hate lotions.
    They can get cavities, and plaque buildup, all at the same time..
    And they are just a path to ground...
    (or earth, to you StudeBrits)

    Biggest rule about points is to only use a points file. Sandpaper is a no-no, because silica dioxide grit is an insulator.
    Jeff[8D]


    quote:Originally posted by fh929

    Well I friend came over to look at the 37 that would not start. he checked a few things, asked for a nail file !! he filed the new points. IT RUNS !! this is the 3rd set of points that would not work. Thanks to all on here that tried to help. I learned a lot. If it not been for this forum I think I would have sold it. I took me 32 years to get it done. I was ready to give up.

    Thanke to all. I will try to post some pictures of it
    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

    Jeff


    Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

    Comment


    • #3
      Right, Jeff... but I have got them going before by dragging a matchbook cover through the points, and using same to set the gap...

      Robert K. Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
      http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2358680/1

      Comment


      • #4
        quote:Originally posted by DEEPNHOCK


        Ignition points are wonderous things..
        They need alignment.
        They need pampering.
        They like being roughed up (but only with metal)
        They like to be shocked a little, and shocked more (when they first wake up)..
        They need constant adjustment....sometimes twice a decade[:0]
        They detest bath's.
        They hate lotions.
        They can get cavities, and plaque buildup, all at the same time..
        And they are just a path to ground...
        (or earth, to you StudeBrits)

        Biggest rule about points is to only use a points file. Sandpaper is a no-no, because silica dioxide grit is an insulator.
        Jeff[8D]


        quote:Originally posted by fh929

        Well I friend came over to look at the 37 that would not start. he checked a few things, asked for a nail file !! he filed the new points. IT RUNS !! this is the 3rd set of points that would not work. Thanks to all on here that tried to help. I learned a lot. If it not been for this forum I think I would have sold it. I took me 32 years to get it done. I was ready to give up.

        Thanke to all. I will try to post some pictures of it
        Jeff, I've used sandpaper for years on ignition points, but usually silicon carbide paper (the black stuff). Silicon dioxide is quartz, i.e. actual sand, and it is only used on the absolute cheapest grade of "flint" sandpaper, the kind you'd use to remove badly-checked paint from house trim.

        Just about ANY abrasive grain is an insulator, though. So is oil and/or wax, and new points sets often have a coating of one or the other to protect them from oxidation while in storage. The drill is to clean them with either a points file or abrasive paper, THEN run a clean piece of business card through them to clear away any remaining wax or grit.

        That has stood me in good stead for years.

        Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
        Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

        Comment


        • #5
          For years I've cleaned my new points with a clean rag soaked in petrol. Manually open the points, insert rag, pull out slowly. WAIT, and WAIT, the reassemble and start the car.
          Has always worked OK.
          /H

          Comment

          Working...
          X