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Cat Whiskers

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  • Cat Whiskers

    Method of replacement of the whiskers / both inside and outside of the door glass appears to this geezer to be more troublesome than expected.
    Stapling method used at the factory is obviously not a procedure available to this novice. Question is .. Considering the pop rivet method - is there a manner in which this can be accomplished without mashing the whiskers? Or is there another way to replace them?
    Thanks for any advice or direction.

    Walt

    '49 Starlight Coupe
    1936 Miller Replica/ Stude driveline

  • #2
    The pop-rivit method is acceptable, just use the 1/8 size, the small head will sink down to the bottom of the "fuzzy stuff". A "Sharpie" marker will color the rivet head and make it almost invisible. BTDT
    Dan

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    • #3
      That's funny this would come up. I was looking at the same problem a few days ago. Someone else also suggested pop rivets.

      I've also been wondering about how people install a new baffle over the radiator support in hawks. They used heavy staples originally. I've pulled some out, but I can't see reusing them. Any ideas?

      I've had a replacement for at least two years, and it's still waiting to go in the car!
      "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

      Comment


      • #4
        Scott,
        I"ve had a couple of customers that have purchased those lately, they said theirs came with new staples....sorry I don't know who the vendor was, but I'll bet someone else who sees this can answer. I would feel certain that vendor might sell you those staples separately if you beg a grovle enough.
        Dan

        Comment


        • #5
          Wait! You're right! I got new staples. But, now that I think of it, what stopped me were these questions:

          1. How can you possibly drive the staples through unpierced areas of the radiator support? Does it take a $100 staple machine that I will use once? Trying to use the old staple holes means taking out the old staples. I've taken a few out and they are a son of a ******. There are lots of them, too.

          2. If I try to put the staples through the original staple holes, how do you flatten he staples correctly (i.e. thoroughly)? It seems it would take some sort of clamp.
          "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

          Comment


          • #6
            Scott,
            Never having installed one myself, personally, I would think a heavy set of diagonal wire cutters, a pair of Vise-Grip pliers and mabe a small screw driver and a lot of patience [}]. First I'd remmove that bar it is stapled to and go to a comfortable place to work. A bench vise would then be adviseable. Mark the location of the old rubber if it is still in place. Carefully straighten out the old staples then pull them out. Position the new rubber where the old one came from, and securily clamp it in place using several clamps along the full length. Use a straight pin, a large sewing needle may fit through the hole in the metal bar, and carefully mark the new rubber, at the same time piercing a hole in the rubber for the new staple to go through. As you can see, this will take time.[:X] Make sure the rubber doesn't slip out of position under the clamps. You might be able to bend the staples over with a large pair of slip-joint pliers, (Channel-Lock), otherwise, use a hammer and make sure you "back-up" the back side of the staple with something heavy. Hope this helps...
            [8D]
            Dan

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks Dan,

              I have no doubt your method will work. The hardest part is being patient with something that's simple in theory but tedious in the extreme. If I finish the job I'll definitely deserve a treat. You'd think after 2 years I would've done it, but those staples did me in.
              "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks Dan.
                I appreciate the info. This ole coot will give it a try.
                As to removing the staples I had no problem, using a 1/8" shank
                electric grinder with same size width grinding wheel. While tedious
                the removal was completed without damage to the parent metal.
                Cool tip on the coloring..Thanks again. SDC guys are the greatest!

                '49 Starlight Coupe
                1936 Miller Replica/ Stude driveline

                Comment


                • #9
                  quote:Originally posted by ROADRACELARK

                  Scott,
                  Never having installed one myself, personally, I would think a heavy set of diagonal wire cutters, a pair of Vise-Grip pliers and mabe a small screw driver and a lot of patience [}]. First I'd remmove that bar it is stapled to and go to a comfortable place to work. A bench vise would then be adviseable. Mark the location of the old rubber if it is still in place. Carefully straighten out the old staples then pull them out. Position the new rubber where the old one came from, and securily clamp it in place using several clamps along the full length. Use a straight pin, a large sewing needle may fit through the hole in the metal bar, and carefully mark the new rubber, at the same time piercing a hole in the rubber for the new staple to go through. As you can see, this will take time.[:X] Make sure the rubber doesn't slip out of position under the clamps. You might be able to bend the staples over with a large pair of slip-joint pliers, (Channel-Lock), otherwise, use a hammer and make sure you "back-up" the back side of the staple with something heavy. Hope this helps...
                  [8D]
                  Dan
                  .......I installed one I bought from SI almost exactly this way....in the original staple holes. It does work !

                  1961 HAWK..BLACK.. 4bc,4-speed,TT

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'm doing cat whiskers right now for this wagon. Those original clips are easy. Mark where they go. then lay the whisker piece on a block of wood On the end grain ideally.
                    Then holding the clip with your hand, use a small hammer to drive the teeth of the clip thru the metal backing of the whisker strip. First one tooth, then the other.
                    Now, flip it over, support the end of the clip on the edge of the wood block and hammer the protruding tooth inward, so that it clasps like a staple would. Do the other side and progress to the next clip.

                    Again, with those baffle staples, if the new staples fit the old holes - lay the baffle piece on the end grain of a block of wood, place the metal strip on top, where it's supposed to be and then using a small ballpeen hammer, tap the staples all the way thru - flip it over and whack down the staple ends. Then go onto the next one.

                    Miscreant at large.

                    1957 Transtar 1/2ton
                    1960 Larkvertible V8
                    1958 Provincial wagon
                    1953 Commander coupe
                    1957 President 2-dr
                    1955 President State
                    1951 Champion Biz cpe
                    1963 Daytona project FS
                    No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Walt,
                      My instructions for the cat whiskers was for the ones on the door panel side, (inside the window). Mr. Biggs is correct on the whisker for the door side, (outside the window). Sorry for not making that clear.
                      Dan

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        While we're on this topic has anyone noticed that on 1966 cars the cat whiskers on the door are in 4 or 5 pieces 1 inch long and spaced out? Talk about frugal. My 1964 Daytona 4 door has one long strip on the door and on the door panel. The 1966 cars weren't done the same way, apparently. They only used continuous strips on the door panels.
                        "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I've never seen one as such. jimmijim
                          sigpicAnything worth doing deserves your best shot. Do it right the first time. When you're done you will know it. { I'm just the guy who thinks he knows everything, my buddy is the guy who knows everything.} cheers jimmijim*****SDC***** member

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I'll try to post a picture later. It's the same on all the windows. Actually, it looks like Studebaker used the regular cat whisker backing with the stainless bead, but without the fuzzy stuff. Then, they attached the strip to the doors using 4 or 5 clips that have about 1 inch of rubber-like material which comes in contact with the windows. Maybe they were fuzzy to begin with, but I am beginning to doubt it.

                            It's real hard to believe they could have saved any money doing it that way, but I can't see any other reason why they would have.
                            "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              As to crimping the cat's whisker clips, I used a narrow grinding wheel and a rat tail file to modify one side of a cheap pair of slip joint pliers. I had to go in about 5/16 inch to get it to work, but it beats a hammer and a loose block of wood.

                              Tom Bredehoft
                              '53 Commander Coupe
                              '60 Lark VI
                              '05 Legacy Ltd Wagon
                              All Indiana built cars

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