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Electric Wiper Repair

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  • Electric Wiper Repair

    The wipers on my 1961 Lark were working but would quit after a short time and seemed to need to cool down before starting again which is not good for a daily driver in western Washington.

    I had a choice of sending mine in to be rebuilt for $160.00 and six weeks loss of use or trying to fix it myself so out it came.

    I put the armature in a drill press and used a file to flatten out the contact area then used 320 grit sand paper to dress the brushes. I also had to replace the covering on some of the field wiring and needed to solder the connections, but all together it was a simple job and the wipers work great now.

    1961 Lark

  • #2
    quote:Originally posted by jcarmichael

    The wipers on my 1961 Lark were working but would quit after a short time and seemed to need to cool down before starting again which is not good for a daily driver in western Washington.

    I had a choice of sending mine in to be rebuilt for $160.00 and six weeks loss of use or trying to fix it myself so out it came.

    I put the armature in a drill press and used a file to flatten out the contact area then used 320 grit sand paper to dress the brushes. I also had to replace the covering on some of the field wiring and needed to solder the connections, but all together it was a simple job and the wipers work great now.

    1961 Lark
    Cool!
    Nice to see someone take the bull by the horns and simply FIX something by diving in and having at it, as opposed to agonizing over whether or not parts can be hard, or what specialty shop to send the old part out to.

    Lots of subassemblies on our old cars are amenable to repairs that really don't amount to much more than cleaning and lubrication.

    Congratulations on a job well done!

    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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    • #3
      That's part of the appeal, to me, of a Studebaker or other old car. Most of the things on the car can be disassembled and fixed, rather than being a heat-sealed plastic assembly. That's good and it's also bad; I have spent quite a few hours cleaning and lubing minor little motors, switches, etc... (but everything electrical works!)

      nate

      --
      55 Commander Starlight
      62 Daytona hardtop
      http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel
      --
      55 Commander Starlight
      http://members.cox.net/njnagel

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      • #4
        Hello, are you related to Vernon Carmichael?

        Dwain G.

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        • #5
          As Nate and Gord have said - a good part of the appeal of these old machines is that things (subassemblies) were made to be repaired. And they're simple enough that most anyone can do it with some moxie and a bit of common sense.[:0][]

          I'm no Houdini but there's damn little on a Stude I can't fix if I've a mind to![8D]

          Good for you, jcarmichael!!!

          Miscreant at large.

          1957 Transtar 1/2ton
          1960 Larkvertible V8
          1958 Provincial wagon
          1953 Commander coupe
          1957 President 2-dr
          1955 President State
          1951 Champion Biz cpe
          1963 Daytona project FS
          No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

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          • #6
            Not related that I know of however we come from the Kansas area.

            1961 Lark

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