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Setting the valves on a 1949 Studebaker truck

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  • Roscomacaw
    replied
    Such a loop in the line is not necessary.

    Miscreant at large.

    1957 Transtar 1/2ton
    1960 Larkvertible V8
    1958 Provincial wagon
    1953 Commander coupe
    1957 President 2-dr
    1955 President State
    1951 Champion Biz cpe
    1963 Daytona project FS

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    quote:Originally posted by DilloCrafter

    If you look at the photo taken from the left side of the engine, you can see that it's a vacuum advance, with a metal line running around the front of the engine and then back toward the carburetor.

    The rebuild kit you get should have a diagram or two. But if it's lost quality after being copied, let me know. I have some pages from an original Carter manual, and I can make a high-res copy to email you in PDF format.

    1955 1/2 Ton Pickup
    Also shouldn't that line have a bend in it early Volkwagens had a loop in theres to keep the gas out of the diaphram, so it wouldn't ruin it.

    Leave a comment:


  • studegary
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by DilloCrafter

    This page at The Old Car Manual Project http://www.tocmp.com/brochures/Stude...e/image15.html is from a 1950 truck brochure (mine, actually). It, and the previous page would indicate the 2R16 was a 1 1/2 ton, and it seems that those larger trucks had 131" wheelbases, whereas the one in your photos is the 122" wheelbase, 8 ft. bed. I don't think standard truck beds were able to be put on those larger models.

    Mr. Biggs is probably correct about the cab transplant. Also, that page shows the "Commander six" engine of 245 cu. in. was used for the 1 1/2 ton trucks.

    1955 1/2 Ton Pickup

    Early 1949 trucks with the bigger engine came with a 226 cubic inch engine. A running change during the 1949 model year was the switch to the 245.6 cubic inch engine. The standard pickup engine was 170 cubic inches.

    Leave a comment:


  • DilloCrafter
    replied
    If you look at the photo taken from the left side of the engine, you can see that it's a vacuum advance, with a metal line running around the front of the engine and then back toward the carburetor.

    The rebuild kit you get should have a diagram or two. But if it's lost quality after being copied, let me know. I have some pages from an original Carter manual, and I can make a high-res copy to email you in PDF format.

    1955 1/2 Ton Pickup

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Also is the distributor vaccumm or mechanical im not there so i can't look at it and i don't see the vaccumm canester on it but who knows. Also does anyone have a diagram on rebuilding a Carter BBR-1 Carbuator

    Leave a comment:


  • DilloCrafter
    replied
    This page at The Old Car Manual Project http://www.tocmp.com/brochures/Stude...e/image15.html is from a 1950 truck brochure (mine, actually). It, and the previous page would indicate the 2R16 was a 1 1/2 ton, and it seems that those larger trucks had 131" wheelbases, whereas the one in your photos is the 122" wheelbase, 8 ft. bed. I don't think standard truck beds were able to be put on those larger models.

    Mr. Biggs is probably correct about the cab transplant. Also, that page shows the "Commander six" engine of 245 cu. in. was used for the 1 1/2 ton trucks.

    1955 1/2 Ton Pickup

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Thanks for all your help hopefully i'll have a video of it I can link here before to long. Steve

    Leave a comment:


  • Roscomacaw
    replied
    That engine and body tells me it's a 2R15. 16s didn't get that smaller 6 (yours is the 170cu.in. flathead commonly referred to as the "Champion 6" because it debuted in the 1939 Champion cars)

    IF the ID plate (below the end of the seat) says it's a 2R16, either that plate's been changed OR the whole cab's been chaged somewhere along the way (it WOULD swap easily!) and whoever did it just left the 2R16 tag intact on the cab.[}]

    Miscreant at large.

    1957 Transtar 1/2ton
    1960 Larkvertible V8
    1958 Provincial wagon
    1953 Commander coupe
    1957 President 2-dr
    1955 President State
    1951 Champion Biz cpe
    1963 Daytona project FS

    Leave a comment:


  • studegary
    replied
    I am far from expert on these trucks so someone else can chime in. In 1949, a 2R 15 was a one ton and a 2R 16 was 1 1/2 ton. I do not believe that pickups came on bigger than the one ton chassis in 1949, so that would mean that the truck is not a 2R 16.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I have everything needed except the tappets but ill make do it's for a friend also what kind of truck is it it says 2R16 but the brakes are 2R15. We can't figure it out for the life of us Here's some pictures

















    Thanks Steve

    Leave a comment:


  • Roscomacaw
    replied
    I hafta agree, that removing the manifold would be a plus!

    Miscreant at large.

    1957 Transtar 1/2ton
    1960 Larkvertible V8
    1958 Provincial wagon
    1953 Commander coupe
    1957 President 2-dr
    1955 President State
    1951 Champion Biz cpe
    1963 Daytona project FS

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike Van Veghten
    replied
    In doing my Conestoga 6.....it's "MUCH, MUCH" easier to remove the intake/ehxaust manifold first.

    I've done it twice...even with the my shorter fender....you won't break your back...fumble around, drop wrenches, etc., etc.

    I didn't have to replace the gasket, just added a little "Copper Coat" and put it back on, but even if you have to buy a new gasket(head to manifold and manifold to exh. pipe)....it "WILL" be worth the extra few bucks.

    Leave a comment:


  • Roscomacaw
    replied
    The manual says the valves should be adjusted to .016" cold. This requires you have a set of feller gages and (ideally) a set of tappet wrenches - although you may well get by with regular. old open end wrenches if you can find a couple with heads that aren't to thick. Tappet wrenches are thin in cross-section because there isn't much room for two wrenches below the valve spring keeper and the upper portion of the lifter.

    Anyway, valve (side) covers off, bring the engine's #1 piston up to Top Dead Center on the power stroke and adjust the two valve for #1. Then progress thru the firing order and adjust each cyulinder's valves as you reach TDC powerstroke for each succeeding cylinder.

    Firing order is 1 - 5 - 3 - 6 - 2 - 4

    I've not personally done this on a 6 in years, but it's a bit of a pain because you're working OVER the fender yet UNDER the manifold legs.[xx(] But it IS do-able!

    Miscreant at large.

    1957 Transtar 1/2ton
    1960 Larkvertible V8
    1958 Provincial wagon
    1953 Commander coupe
    1957 President 2-dr
    1955 President State
    1951 Champion Biz cpe
    1963 Daytona project FS

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest started a topic Setting the valves on a 1949 Studebaker truck

    Setting the valves on a 1949 Studebaker truck

    How do I go about this I know how to do it on my bus. Also whats the valve clearnce for it. Thanks Steve
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