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One Wire Alternator Conversion Schematic

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Some Linkies.

    http://www.madelectrical.com/catalog/tb-1.shtml

    http://www.rodandcustommagazine.com/...5_0310_rewire/

    http://www.speedwaymotors.com/xq/asp...qx/Product.htm

    http://www.speedwaymotors.com/xq/asp...qx/Product.htm


    P.D.

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  • ddub
    replied
    Can anyone suggest a book that does a good job of explaining auto electrics to the uninitiated?

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  • Rosstude
    replied
    Thought I would chime in on this topic, seeing as I have retrofitted both one, and three wire Delco units.
    The MAD Company has a very informative web site, which I have found helpful. I am fortunate to have an electronics warehouse around the corner to get my bits and pieces from, so I have not bought from MAD.
    Anyway, I installed a one wire on the 66 Wagonaire, in place of the prestolight unit. It works, although you have to rev it up a bit to start the charging. Like I say, it works, and it was an easy install.
    I installed a three wire on a Transtar, in place of the generator. I soldered the armature wire to the ground wire, and then tied them to the harness at the solenoid. I used the field wire for the sensing wire, jumping to where the regulator was, and than into the harness. Had to run a new wire for the idiot light. I use to help a buddy who wired hot rods; he always used the 3 wire, most often with a diode in place of the idiot light, and with a volt meter. I really like the idea of protection via fusible link or other wise, something to add to the "safety" to do list.
    Please, do not go crazy on the amperage. The smallest Delco unit is about all the amperage I would push through the stock 12 volt wiring gauge.
    Here is another helpful site; it is OT a bit, being about lighting.
    http://danielsternlighting.com/home.html


    Ross.
    57 Provincial
    58 Transtar
    66 Wagonaire

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  • parky
    replied
    I just bought a 62 Hawk with a 1 wire alt installed on a sb350. No fusible link. Can the MAD kit apply to this setup without buying a new alternator??

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  • Transtar60
    replied
    The fusible link wire is 12 gauage and 5 1/4" long. Its attached to the batt terminal with a ring connector and then butt connected to the 10 gauge charging wire. All connectors are crimped and soldered and the splice covered with shrink tube.

    http://www.madelectrical.com/catalog/alt-1.shtml

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  • 11SecAvanti
    replied
    What is the blow amperage of the fuse link? Is this a Napa item?

    Start and Stage Your Studebakers

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  • N8N
    replied
    Stude8, that wire only goes to the battery directly on cars without an ammeter. In cars with an ammeter, the wire goes straight to the ammeter where the dash picks up its power, then back to the battery. Just to help people plan where to put the fusible links...

    Y'know, I actually saw a wiring harness nearly go poof in front of me once. I put a fusible link on THAT car. Now my car is nowhere near stock, and yet there's no fusible link. Do as I say not as I do? Guess I have another job to do...

    nate

    --
    55 Commander Starlight
    62 Daytona hardtop
    http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel

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  • prager
    replied
    Go with the M.A.D. kit..I ordered one, and like it allot..I spoke with the owner of the company before I bought it, I wanted to run my project by him...This guy had all the answers and then some!! He is a true guru of the automotive electrical system...give him a call, or look at the web site..This guy's know how and products are very solid.

    Leave a comment:


  • Transtar60
    replied
    Ron,
    That is what I like about the MAD Electrical kit. It includes the fusible link which prevents the" Morning Sunrise under the hood syndrome".

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  • Stude8
    replied
    Ron, remember the output post of that alternator goes direct to the battery + post, if the alternator suffers an internal short to ground (The metal frame?) as in a failed stator winding... the wire will go up in a bright glow instantly! I mean instantly, you have an infinite source of power in that battery, of course it is laced along with other cable wires in the harness and everything else goes up at the same time from core melt down. A fusible link is the safe way to protect the whole vehicle or if you don't mind the inconvenience of a battery switch every time you leave the car (Battery switch doesn't help the day it goes up when you are driving along). Plan a fix rght away. Stude8

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  • 60Lark
    replied
    Ron, If the alternator would short internally, it could potentially back feed into positive wire that goes to your ammeter, if not protected by a fuse.

    Studebaker Fever
    60 Lark
    51 Champion
    Phil

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  • studeclunker
    replied
    Gee... does'nt this sound familliar. That hint about the fusable links is interesting... I have a high output GM alternator on my wagon. It's a three wire setup. Question: Am I looking at a possible fire as well???

    Lotsa Larks!
    K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
    Ron Smith

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  • 60Lark
    replied
    When I converted my 60 Lark to an alternator I did not install a fuse or fusible link in the 6 ga. wire from the starter solenoid to the alternator, but I did install an in-line fuse in the positive wire going into the wiring harness, to prevent any voltage back feed from the engine bay, if a problem occurs. My original generator shorted internally, I had just pulled into the garage and turned the car 0ff, I usually open the hood and disconnect the battery and then just leave the hood open until the next time I want to drive it. If this had not been my normal practice - my Lark, my wifes car, and my house would have burnt. Just as I opened the hood the generator and the feild wires from the generator flashed into a bright glow luckily my tool chest is directly in front of where the Lark sits, I grabbed a cable cutter and cut the positive battery wire, I then looked up and saw that the inside of the passenger compartment was filled with smoke, the short had back fed into the inside wiring harnes via the ammeter wire, for some reason [?] I had a gallon of distilled water in the garage I grabbed it and was able to distinguish the burning wires under the dash as well as the engine bay, before any major damage was done. When I replaced the wiring harness I added fuses that probably were not necessary but I do feel secure in the fact that the fuses will open before something like tat can reoccur I also decided that there would be no ammeter reinstalled in my car, I converted it to a volt meter (with fuse). Prior to this, I had no idea how FAST a car could go up in flames, Like I said if I had just turned the car Off and gone inside, my house would have been burning in a matter of a few minutes. I strongly recommend that you take the time to pop the hood and disconnect the battery, also add some fuses.

    Studebaker Fever
    60 Lark
    51 Champion
    Phil

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  • N8N
    replied
    good point, I didn't think to mention it as that is not an issue in my '55 as it was originally a 6V car (therefore the wires were heavier than 56-up.)

    Wouldn't be a bad idea to install fusible links at the alternator and starter solenoid, either. (those are the two places where the harness can actually get power. If you break the harness at those two places, the whole car is dead.) Come to think of it, I should take my own advice, really... especially since my wiring is already somewhat "custom" (and some of *that* is because the PO had bypassed a circuit breaker... fried the blower motor wiring to a crisp, it did...)

    nate

    --
    55 Commander Starlight
    62 Daytona hardtop
    http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel

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  • Stude8
    replied
    Pay careful attention to the recommendation in the 3rd reply above, from 60lark. If you go to a GM or any other alternator than the one Studebaker used the output wire gauge is TOO SMALL!! Stude alternators were 40 amp output and the GM's are at least 60 amp and higher. I persoanlly have watched two Avanti II's burn up in parking lots after they left their lights on accidently and the battery went dead. A good samaritan jump started the car for them, the GM alternator went to max output and in a less than a minute the output wire WHICH WAS TOO SMALL A GAUGE caught fire from the heat of the extra amperage flowing in it. It happens so fast you don't know what is going on until it is too late to save the wiring harness.
    The early Avanti II's used the original Studebaker wire sizes unknowingly until theu had a few fire reports and fixed them with larger gauge output wires. Stude8

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