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48 truck rims/frozen engine

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  • 48 truck rims/frozen engine

    I have recently obtained my fathers 1948 studebaker truck which I don't know anything about, the ser num is R158404 hope some one can tell me what or where to find info on this. My plan is to repair it to a daily driver status ( so i'll need a good manual from ?) .The last time the truck was reg was in 1970 which was the only time I can remember riding in it. The truck appears to be all there, It is a 6 cyl with a 4 speed trans and split ring rims with 5 bolt holes(I think thats what they are called). My first goal is to get the truck in a rolling status (getting it of my trailer) as its tires are rotted from the last 35yrs of sitting around. Im having a time of finding someone to change the tires so I wondering if there is newer style rim that will bolt on? My second goal is to turn the engine which might be frozen, any ideas on how to get it unstuck or is a tear down the only way.
    Thank you for your time!
    Clinton

  • #2
    Not sure about the split rims, but you may want to try to free up the engine where it sits. Pull the spark plugs and pour some ATF, Kroil, or other light oil in there and let it sit (put the spark plugs back in.) Next time you go out to look at the truck do the same thing. Hopefully by the time you get it to your work space it will have worked into the rings and started to free them up. I've seen several engines go from locked up to running simply by soaking like this.

    When you get it to wherever you're going to work on it, once you get the engine to turn over, change the oil before trying to start it. You don't want to be pumping that 30 year old goo through the engine...

    good luck,

    nate

    --
    55 Commander Starlight
    62 Daytona hardtop
    http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel
    --
    55 Commander Starlight
    http://members.cox.net/njnagel

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    • #3
      The same can be said about the fuel system. You'll need to rebuild the carb (simple) and clean out the tank and fuel lines. Odds are the tank may need to be resealed or replaced.

      ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Tom - Sterling Heights, MI

      Ancient Chinese Proverb: "Injection is nice, but I'd rather be blown!"

      1964 Studebaker Daytona - Laguna Blue, Original 4-Spd. Car, Power Steering, Disc Brakes, Bucket Seats, Tinted Glass, Climatizer Ventilation System, AM Radio (136,989 Miles)
      Tom - Bradenton, FL

      1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
      1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

      Comment


      • #4
        well, really, he should change ALL fluids before he tries to drive it, but the engine oil is probably the most critical. I would definitely change engine oil, coolant, gear oil in tranny, gear oil in rear end, repack all wheel bearings, and change the brake fluid (actually he will probably end up replacing all the hoses and wheel cylinders anyway and likely rebuilding or replacing the master as well so that is academic)

        only way you're going to be able to trust the thing is to make sure you've done *everything* that you're supposed to. Trust me, if you skip a couple steps probably nothing bad will happen but that voice in the back of your head just won't shut the heck up...

        nate

        --
        55 Commander Starlight
        62 Daytona hardtop
        http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel
        --
        55 Commander Starlight
        http://members.cox.net/njnagel

        Comment


        • #5
          Are you sure they are 'split' rims? Stude used a ring type clamp that slid into two flats on the wheel and they were put on using a special hammer procedure...
          In either case, let a truck tire shop do the tire removal and reinstallation. They have the tools and the safety equipment to do the job right. Have them strip the wheels down bare for you to clean up and restore/repaint/inspect. Let them mount them up.
          This is a serious safety area that could kill you if done improperly....so please be extra careful.
          Jeff[8D]


          quote:Originally posted by 48TRUCKIN

          I have recently obtained my fathers 1948 studebaker truck which I don't know anything about, the ser num is R158404 hope some one can tell me what or where to find info on this. My plan is to repair it to a daily driver status ( so i'll need a good manual from ?) .The last time the truck was reg was in 1970 which was the only time I can remember riding in it. The truck appears to be all there, It is a 6 cyl with a 4 speed trans and split ring rims with 5 bolt holes(I think thats what they are called). My first goal is to get the truck in a rolling status (getting it of my trailer) as its tires are rotted from the last 35yrs of sitting around. Im having a time of finding someone to change the tires so I wondering if there is newer style rim that will bolt on? My second goal is to turn the engine which might be frozen, any ideas on how to get it unstuck or is a tear down the only way.
          Thank you for your time!
          Clinton
          DEEPNHOCK at Cox.net
          '37 Coupe Express
          '37 Coupe Express Trailer
          '61 Hawk

          http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock
          HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

          Jeff


          Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



          Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

          Comment


          • #6
            R15s could have 3 different tire sizes fitted. 16", 17" or 20". What size tires are on yours?
            As Jeff says, only a truck tire place is gonna mess with those wheels. Generally, they use cages to inflate the newly fitted tires in. This way, if the wheel blows apart, it's restricted by the cage![:0][xx(]

            Miscreant at large.

            1957 Transtar 1/2ton
            1960 Larkvertible V8
            1958 Provincial wagon
            1953 Commander coupe
            1957 President 2-dr
            1955 President State
            1951 Champion Biz cpe
            1963 Daytona project FS
            No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

            Comment


            • #7
              Widow makers, that's what they used to call those 2 piece rims.

              Comment


              • #8
                Yeah Mr Biggs, and the cage better be strong. I was present when one rim blew apart. Loosened everybody's bowel, it did. Reshaped the cage, too. The energy contained in a pumped up tyre is considerable.
                /H

                Comment


                • #9
                  I've done my own truck rims. The toughest part of it is getting the old, hard tire off the old, rusty rim. I usually resorted to a drill or angle grinder to cut the the tire bead. It can be a REAL struggle, believe me.

                  Once the tire is off the rim, sandblast and paint the rim before mounting a new tire, and take the time to inspect the rim and grind off any damage which might affect how the lockring seats. Don't mix and match rims and lock rings, either.

                  Once this is done, mounting the new tire is relatively easy. Lacking an inflation cage, I put two loops of 5/16" chain through the holes in the rim and around the tire loosely, and secured them with clevises. Laid the tire flat on the ground, and aired it up by way of a remote hose, so I could stand 10-12 feet away, and out of the direct flight path of the lockring should it blow AND take out the chains. I've had no problems so far, doing it like this.

                  Being as this is a public forum, I hesitate to recommend that anyone do the same as I did, , though. I will say, that when deaths or injuries from exploding wheels are analyzed, the common ingredients of the incidents are usually familiarity and haste. In other words, people who thought they know it all were cutting corners to save time or out sheer laziness.

                  That's why I took the time to thoroughly clean and sandblast each rim, and to inspect it and grind off any burrs, etc. before painting. And then I took my time mounting the tire, took my time to ensure the lockring was properly fitted, and took my time to hang the safety chains, and took my time to air it up to a few psi, check the fit of the lockring, let the air out, check it again, and then air it back up.

                  Even if you choose to have a tire shop do your wheels, it'd pay to sandblast and paint the rims; makes 'em look like new, and when everything is clean and properly-fitting, so much more likely that the tire shop will do a first-class job.

                  Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
                  Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Sorry for the delay in responding back, the rims are 17" and are of the type that have the retaing ring configuration. What would be the new radial size that will fit these rims (lt2657017)? I have filled the cylinders with ATF and will check them in a couple of weeks. The oil on the stick looks like crude oil and will get replaced before turning the motor if it turns. Looking at the wiring it appears that is was a meal for a rodent or two. I have penitration oil on all the bolts that I know will have to be taken apart and I'm finding that working on the trailer at this point is Ok so there it will stayfor now. I will inpect the brake system when I get the wheels off in a week of two. They did apply when we were loading it on the trailer.
                    My goal is to get a full detailed assesment before chucking a lot of $$ at it.
                    thanks for your help.
                    Clinton


                    quote:Originally posted by Mr.Biggs

                    R15s could have 3 different tire sizes fitted. 16", 17" or 20". What size tires are on yours?
                    As Jeff says, only a truck tire place is gonna mess with those wheels. Generally, they use cages to inflate the newly fitted tires in. This way, if the wheel blows apart, it's restricted by the cage![:0][xx(]

                    Miscreant at large.

                    1957 Transtar 1/2ton
                    1960 Larkvertible V8
                    1958 Provincial wagon
                    1953 Commander coupe
                    1957 President 2-dr
                    1955 President State
                    1951 Champion Biz cpe
                    1963 Daytona project FS

                    Comment

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