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Advice requested on Stage 1 restoration

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  • #16
    As an insurance adjuster/appraiser, let me jump in here again. Policies can be had from most classic collector insurance companies to cover a vehicle in the restoration/project phase. Let's face it, a car that is 50% finished is just a bunch of loose parts. Keeping receipts for this type of project is a necessity if something were to happen during the build (fire, vandalism, theft, etc.).

    My car is insured for over $5000 due to the parts I've purchased for the project. I've upped my coverage from $2500 last July. Any car is more valuable as parts than a rolling vehicle. When the car is completed and collision coverage will be required, an appraisal will need to be completed and supplied to the insurance company to set the agreed value.

    As for record keeping, I hate paper. I scan my receipts into the computer and keep the receipts organized by date and location on the vehicle. Also, as I'm sure most claims under these policies are from a fire, I'd keep a back up disc up to date and in a different location. By up to date, I mean within the last month or so. I car is an investment...until you drive it [)].

    As for homeowners coverage, it may cover loose parts to a point, but it definitely won't cover the car/shell/frame. This is considered a vehicle and is not covered under contents, licensed or not. As always, discuss your needs with your agent and insurance company.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Tom - Sterling Heights, MI

    Ancient Chinese Proverb: "Injection is nice, but I'd rather be blown!"

    1964 Studebaker Daytona - Laguna Blue, Original 4-Spd. Car, Power Steering, Disc Brakes, Bucket Seats, Tinted Glass, Climatizer Ventilation System, AM Radio (136,989 Miles)
    Tom - Bradenton, FL

    1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
    1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

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    • #17
      quote:Originally posted by Swifster

      I'd use a new harness from someone like Painless, Ron Francis or others. I think an OEM harness is an invitation for a fire. JMHO
      AMEN to that.

      C&L's Parts (http://www.clparts.com/aprodpages/awiring.html) sell the EZ Wiring Mini20 Kit (http://www.ezwiring.com/harness.htm) for about $135.00.

      p.d.

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      • #18
        I wouldn't be too pessimistic about that old radio. Though they weren't as sophisticated as modern stuff, they will work fine after many years of disuse. The part most subject to deterioration is the speaker cone. The radio knobs and plastic pushbuttons are next, followed by the volume control and the thread that actuates the tuner. Which reminds me, anyone have a nice 58 radio for sale? Mine is missing.

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        • #19
          Interesting that you say that.
          When I showed up at my 2nd cousin's with my "new" Avanti, they started reminising about their Studebakers. One item was repeated. In the 50's and 60's they could keep their favorite AM station all the way through the Rocky Mountain valleys. They could not get this reception on modern '70 and later radios.

          quote:Originally posted by Cruiser

          I wouldn't be too pessimistic about that old radio. Though they weren't as sophisticated as modern stuff, they will work fine after many years of disuse. The part most subject to deterioration is the speaker cone. The radio knobs and plastic pushbuttons are next, followed by the volume control and the thread that actuates the tuner. Which reminds me, anyone have a nice 58 radio for sale? Mine is missing.
          Terry,
          1963 Avanti R2, 63SR1065 http://sterkel.org/avanti
          1985 Kubota L2202 (Diesel)
          2000 VW Jetta GLS
          2003 VW Jetta TDI (Diesel) http://sterkel.org/tdi

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          • #20
            Good Luck with your project.....adjust upwards your time and money committment about 20%....Also, as others will chime in: I would not go with an expensive Synthetic Oil if you plan to drive the car a lot..and that's what you'll want to do when it's done.....I've never met a Stude V8 that had a real bone dry bottom after ~15K miles on it.......Now I'm sure the first person to jump in and insist "his" engine doesn't leak oil will tell you he gets 24 mpg too.....<G>

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            • #21
              Catching up after the holidays. Regarding clock repairs, the South Carolina SDC has an article titled "1956-1964 Studebaker Hawk Clock Repair" posted in their technical section. Says it also applies to other Studebaker models.

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              • #22
                Save the receipts!! Some nosy people will always ask 'whats it worth?'-or-'how much it cost ya?'...not that you have to answer honestly,but it will be a good fact to know,when it's all said and done.
                Also,some day at a car show,maybe you'll park next to the same such car,and it will be interesting to compare notes with the other owner.
                And,maybe you will sell it for a big chunk of cash and the IRS will want their share.You may need proof of non-profit to avoid taxes!

                Home of the Almostahawk
                Oglesby,Il.

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                • #23
                  quote:Originally posted by 57slvrhwk6

                  Catching up after the holidays. Regarding clock repairs, the South Carolina SDC has an article titled "1956-1964 Studebaker Hawk Clock Repair" posted in their technical section. Says it also applies to other Studebaker models.
                  Actually it's the NC SDC.
                  http://ncsdc.com/TechnicalPages/ClockRepair.htm

                  Lee

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