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Auto Transmission Cooling

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  • Auto Transmission Cooling

    Hey guys, just for my ignorance, here's a basic and perhaps even a dumb question. At what point (year) did Stude switch over from a water cooled to an oil cooled transmission? And what size were the water cooled lines as opposed to oil lines)? And what pump was used to circulate the coolant--the engine water pump (I assume) or did the trans feature a coolant pump? I've always been a clutch type person and have no experience with auto shifters and hence (in part at least) my ignorance. Thanks a bunch! Until today I assumed them to all be water cooled and was surprised to learn differently.
    wagone and the mighty Avanti

  • #2
    You made a basic error, some heavey duty automatics were water cooled, but they just pumped the AT fluid through a cooler that was at the bottom of the radiator with the stock transmission pump.

    Studebaker On The Net http://stude.com
    64 GT Hawk
    64 R2 4 speed Challenger
    63 R2 4 speed GT Hawk
    53 Street rod
    JDP Maryland

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    • #3
      As JDP says, Heavy Duty trans's were cooled by circuiting some of the tranny fluid up and thru the oil cooler that's built in to the lower tank of the radiator. This would include Power-Shift versions as well.
      All other automatics depended on air flow thru the built-on fan on the exterior of the torque convertor to cool the fluid. That's why there's inlet holes in the rear of the bellhousing - to let cool air in, while the side outlet is where the heated air exits.

      Miscreant at large.

      1957 Transtar 1/2ton
      1960 Larkvertible V8
      1958 Provincial wagon
      1953 Commander coupe
      1957 President 2-dr
      1955 President State
      1951 Champion Biz cpe
      1963 Daytona project FS
      No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

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      • #4
        I find this interesting. Is the built in fan electric? Does my Ford auto traney in my 1955 Prsident have a cooler. This is a transplant traney.

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        • #5
          Curt, the fan Bob speaks of is merely ribs that are cast into the back of the torque converter. If your car has a Stude engine, then it is most certainly using a Stude bellhousing and torque converter. As for other cooling possiblities it may be that the Borg Warner/Ford trans in your car is cooled by the radiator. Look for two small oil lines entering the bottom radiator tank.
          Also, I'm not sure if the heavy duty (water cooled) Flightomatic was introduced in '62 or '63.
          Tim K.
          Tim K.
          \'64 R2 GT Hawk

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          • #6
            Amazing what our minds will do to us. I would have sworn that someone told me or I read that Stude BW transmissions were water cooled--but it turns out they are (were) no different than other auto trans in that they used an oil cooler in one of the tanks of the radiator--to me that is hardly "water cooled". No more water cooled than an oil cooler exposed directly to air flow is "air cooled". Thanks guys. I'm in my 60s and have never owned an auto transmission equipped car. Thus my ignorance. [:I][:I]
            wagone

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            • #7
              Do the Avanti's not have cooling lines to the rad.?
              If memory serves me well(& it may not) a Packard Hawk I once owned had the cooling lines & that car was a 58K unmolested auto.The VIN #
              was 58LS1488 if it's still out there.

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              • #8
                Yes, they do. That's why I mentioned Power-shift trannies. The DG series has a "fan" incorporated into it's torque convertor too. Really - as with the FOM's, the "fan" is a sheet metal ring affixed to the outer surface of the convertor. It's shape and the fact that it spins, causes it to pump air.

                Here's a Flight-o-Matics convertor fan:


                And one on a DG TC:


                Miscreant at large.

                1957 Transtar 1/2ton
                1960 Larkvertible V8
                1958 Provincial wagon
                1953 Commander coupe
                1957 President 2-dr
                1955 President State
                1951 Champion Biz cpe
                1963 Daytona project FS
                No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

                Comment

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