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Steering gear clearance to headers..

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  • Steering gear clearance to headers..

    I just installed a pair of tight tuck headers on my Chevy engine in a 62 Lark. They clear the steering gear box by about a 16th of an inch. Is there any problems with radiant heat on these gear boxes? What kind of fluid goes in these? Thanks!!

  • #2
    Might I suggest a heat shield made of aluminum?

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    • #3
      That would be a thin shield.

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      • #4
        Should be made of stainless steel or use a header wrap, aluminum conducts heat too easily and with only a gap of .062 there isn't much room.

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        • #5
          I would reshape the tube that is close to steering so you have atleast 1/2 inch clearance then wrap that tube. You can also shift your engine to the right to get clearance, dont know what type of mounts you have, but this would be my first method to explore., just dont get too carried away easy goes it. Its not a good Idea to get the steering box too hot as you have seals and a possible fire hazzard if oil ignites from radiated heat. Best regards on your project, please Tell us more about the car OK, Tom.

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          • #6
            Thanks guys!!.. Tom, heres a little more info..1962 Lark 2dr sedan. Had a 170 6 cyl. I want to hot rod it a little, so I found a LT1 350, aluminum heads, intake, etc..built pretty high perf, for a carbed engine. These headers fit in real close to the steeering gear box. A heat shield maybe a good way to go..Also kinda modifying the tube in question..maybe say with a block of wood and hammer may also work..I found a heat shield blanket for my starter that possibly could be modifyed to fit the gear box...What type of fluid is in the gear box? I think moving the engine would take allot of moving stuff around. I used the mounts from a 65-66 Stude w/chevy 283. How about making a heat shield and putting some header wrap on it rather than the header itself? I got the ceramic coated headers and would hate to wrap and possibly mess up the coating..Any ideas..Thanks!!

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            • #7
              Perhaps there is a synthetic fluid out there that is not affected by heat. Where did you get your headers? Are they the ones for S10's with V8 conversions? I'm anxious to hear how you make out as I am going to do the same swap with my 170 equipped 63 2dr sedan
              Todd


              63 Lark 2dr Sedan

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              • #8
                Todd!! Good to hear from you!! I need to give you a call about the project as a whole..e-mail me your number again please..Anyhow..the headers are from Summit racing. They are Patriot tight tuck headers. I'll try to get a good photo to post this a.m. Look foward to talking with you...Wes

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                • #9
                  You could use a synthetic gear oil, but you still may have a problem with the seals cooking. Is this a Saginaw or Ross box? The Ross box requires a thicker lube. ISTR reading somewhere that someone had packed a Ross box with Redline assembly lube and that worked out well. A Saginaw would take something like MT-90.

                  nate

                  --
                  55 Commander Starlight
                  62 Daytona hardtop
                  http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel
                  --
                  55 Commander Starlight
                  http://members.cox.net/njnagel

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                  • #10
                    Nate, I'm not sure which gear box is which..Also, how do you add photos to these posts? I have a pic of the headers..Thanks!!

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                    • #11
                      What brand of headers did you use? Would you have a model number or part number?

                      Thanks for the info!!

                      Rob

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                      • #12
                        Eyeball the header really good then remove header and repair on bench by bolting to a spare SB chev head. If you cant do this then have a good exhaut system guru do it. You need atleast 1/2" minimum clearance and your 66 mounts wont do it. I would shy away from flattening header tubing as this just may destroy power from that cylinder. Wrap your headers and install. If these were 1-7/8 ths dia. primarys you could flatten a bit but probably are 1-5/8ths??? The oil is probably 80/90 standard gear oil. keep box cool to warm only. Sounds like you are having fun Thanks for filling us all in, Regards Tom.

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                        • #13
                          quote:Originally posted by prager

                          I just installed a pair of tight tuck headers on my Chevy engine in a 62 Lark. They clear the steering gear box by about a 16th of an inch.
                          I ran into the same prob when installing the 327 in my '54. Actually, this is a good thread for all considering a "transplant". We all think the motor mounts are the hard part when in fact, they are probably the easy part. In addition to exhaust problems like both Wes and I ran into, there are trany mount "opportunities", clutch and/or shift/throttle pressure trans linkage, throttle linkage, engine/trans allignment, pinion angle, cooling system (custom radiator, hoses, shroud, fan(s), drive shaft/u joints, hood clearance, fuel delivery, and probably 10 others I've blotted out of my mind due to the pain <g>. Many transplants have been performed successfully, but it's my guess that for every success, there are several that have been abandoned due to difficult and expensive engineering tasks encountered DURING the transplant. If you are considering one, think through EVERY possible systems change and engineer them AHEAD of time. You'll have a better idea of the fabricating that will be necessary and the budget you will need (but you'll probably still be surprised by a few items...hmmm, I can't remove the distributor with the engine in the car when I install it like I designed, or why do I have this wierd vibration over 20 MPH?).

                          What I ended up doing is moving the steering box back 1/2" and down 1/2" and lengthening the drag link appropriately. This gave me good clearance to the generic block hugger headers I used. As a side note, I shortened the steering column 2" to get the steering wheel out of my face and into a more modern "arms out" driving position.

                          Good luck with your project!

                          -Dick-
                          Dick Steinkamp
                          Bellingham, WA

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                          • #14
                            I know there is also someone out there that is taking original ramshorn manifolds and modifying them to flow just as well as headers. I'll try to find them. This might be too late for you Wes, but may help someone else contemplating a swap.

                            Todd

                            63 Lark 2dr Sedan

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                            • #15
                              quote:Originally posted by tstclr

                              I know there is also someone out there that is taking original ramshorn manifolds and modifying them to flow just as well as headers. I'll try to find them. This might be too late for you Wes, but may help someone else contemplating a swap.

                              Todd

                              63 Lark 2dr Sedan
                              I guarantee the cast iron rams horn manifolds will create a bigger interference problem on the driver's side than tight tuck or block hugger tubular headers. If you're not concerned about optimizing performance, a right side, rear dump manifold from a 70's-80's small block might work as a front dump on the left side.

                              -Dick-
                              Dick Steinkamp
                              Bellingham, WA

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