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Do I need an electric fuel pump?

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  • Do I need an electric fuel pump?

    Hello all!! I am converting my 62 Lark to a chevy engine. I have the mounts from a 65-66 stude to chevy..I was told that the fuel pump on the chevy engine would not fit well with these mounts..be that as it will should I run an electric pump? And if so what kind would be a good one? I have a 600cfm Holley..Thanks!!!

  • #2
    Yes. Get a Holley red and a Holley fuel pressure regulator. Follow the instructions.

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    • #3
      Just be sure to wire the electric fuel pump properly with a low oil pressure switch (so that the pump stops pumping if the engine is not running). We don't need to lose any Studebakers due to fires.
      Jeff[8D]




      quote:Originally posted by prager

      Hello all!! I am converting my 62 Lark to a chevy engine. I have the mounts from a 65-66 stude to chevy..I was told that the fuel pump on the chevy engine would not fit well with these mounts..be that as it will should I run an electric pump? And if so what kind would be a good one? I have a 600cfm Holley..Thanks!!!
      DEEPNHOCK at Cox.net
      '37 Coupe Express
      '37 Coupe Express Trailer
      '61 Hawk

      http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock
      HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

      Jeff


      Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



      Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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      • #4
        if you use the oil pressure switch remember to use a spring loaded toggle or push button bypass switch for carb priming prior to start.

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        • #5
          A note on the Holley pumps....
          While some may work....for a long time.....most do not on the street. The design are so that they really don't like running a long time at a crack.
          Also, what ever pump you use, install a good filter "BEFORE" the pump.

          I've had very good luck with the Carter electric pumps over many, many years on the street. They are more designed for the street and long term running.

          You still should also, as some have said, put a regulator near the carburetor. With a small gauge attached to the regulator, set to what you are using, doing with the car.

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          • #6
            I have had good luck with the AC also. The one on my 53 K has been there since the 60's.

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            • #7
              Is an electric fuel pump necessary when you have a carburetor at 600 cfm? If not, why use one at all? I've never understood the fascination with electric fuel pumps. They're annoyingly noisy, not stock, and just one more thing that could break.

              I bought a 1947 Commander once that had an electric fuel pump with not many miles on it. I thought that was a good thing, but it was a complete failure. After I took it out and went back to the stock mechanical setup I had no more problems AND no more pump noise coming from the back of the car. Just becuase it's electric doesn't mean diddly as far as I am concerned.
              "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

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              • #8
                Good for you Scott.
                I glad people can post their own way of doing things for others to read.

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                • #9
                  What ever floats your boat or (Studebaker)

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                  • #10
                    Ok, let me ask this question..Has anyone converted to a chevy, or maybe has a 65 or 66 with a chevy small block, does the Chevy mechanical fuel pump not fit well with the mounts or suspension? I had heard from somewhere that the fuel pump may hit something, or not clear, or something to that effect..Any truth to that? Thanks!!

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                    • #11
                      I would "assume" a mechanical pump would fit....isn't that what Studebaker used? I don't think they used an electrical from the factory.
                      I'd also "assume".....that a light hit with a grinder or file would help with most any interference of todays pumps.

                      I can't say on my Lark, I made my own engine mounting system and the mechanical pump does fit.

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                      • #12
                        Best person to ask is Jon Meyers in Ohio he sells the mounts and has lots of feed back.

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                        • #13
                          I am quite sure that the front end suspension components are the same between the Studebaker powered Larks and the 65's and 66's. If there is a difference I don't think it was done because of the position of the mechanical fuel pump. I have a '66 Cruiser and I had a 1964 Daytona. The engine bay looks the same to me.

                          Some people just feel better with an electric fuel pump. Heaven only knows why.
                          "Madness...is the exception in individuals, but the rule in groups" - Nietzsche.

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                          • #14
                            Thanks for the quick responce guys!! I would prefer to stay with a mechanical pump. I just wanted to make darn sure that it would work out as far as it fitting in..Thanks again guys!!

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                            • #15
                              If you get a Studebaker mechanical fuel pump for '65 or '66 Studebaker 283, it will fit. A CHEVY fuel pump that you commonly find at your local autoparts dealer may not fit.

                              I believe it has to do with the way the inlet/outlet nipples are "clocked".

                              In any case, it's close quarters in that department with the McKinnon block in a Stude.

                              In this instance, I'd go with the electric pump, since the correct mechanical pump is a scarcer item than the one which fits Stude V8s.

                              I'd go with a reciprocating bellows or diaphragm pump, like a Carter or Autopulse. Bolt it to the frame with a mount made of two pieces of old tire tread or conveyor belting so there is NO metal to metal contact to telegraph noise. Then ensure you have a ground wire for the pump.

                              Do provide some means to have the pump shut down when the engine is not running. People used to recommend a Vega oil pressure switch for this purpose, but I wonder if they are even stocked anymore? Probably the most foolproof method is to tee in a standard low oil pressure switch along with the gage, and wire it to the coil of a SPDT relay, so that when the ignition is on, and no oil pressure, the relay coil is energized. Moving contact of the relay goes to the electric pump. Normally-closed goes to the ignition switch (or any convenient 12 volt source that is controlled by the ignition switch). Normally-open connects to the "I" terminal on the starter solenoid. That will allow the pump to run, despite there being low oil pressure, while the engine is being cranked. I just drew this wiring diagram out on a scrap of paper, and I can't see any "gotchas" in it.

                              Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
                              Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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