Announcement

Collapse

Get more Tips, Specs and Technical Data!

Did you know... this Forum is a service of the Studebaker Drivers Club? For more technical tips, specifications, history and tech data, visit the Tech Tips page at the SDC Homepage: www.studebakerdriversclub.com/tips.asp
See more
See less

headliner advise

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • headliner advise

    i have heard that it is much better to remove the front windshield before installing a new headliner, is this good advise. i am not putting a show car together and have never pulled or installed a windshield, so any advise on this would be a lot of help. i really don't want to pull the windshield.

    slow64
    1964 lark daytona
    bd_marks@yahoo.com

  • #2
    The headliner is glued to the windshield frame and the windshield rubber holds it in place.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Tom - Sterling Heights, MI

    Ancient Chinese Proverb: "Injection is nice, but I'd rather be blown!"

    1964 Studebaker Daytona - Laguna Blue, Original 4-Spd. Car, Power Steering, Disc Brakes, Bucket Seats, Tinted Glass, Climatizer Ventilation System, AM Radio (136,989 Miles)
    Tom - Bradenton, FL

    1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
    1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

    Comment


    • #3
      O.K.-So if I am going to replace my windshield(it's cracked) and my Headliner(it's Old & Dirty), I should plan to do them at the same time?

      1960 LARK(4-Door)V8/Deluxe Wagon
      Dallas,Texas

      Comment


      • #4
        Ay-yuh! No better time than the present. You can do the headliner without removing the windshield if the rubber is soft and pliable and you are incredibly coordinated and have a lot of patience and no distractions and can afford another headliner if this doesn't work.

        With earlier models you need to pull the backlight and rear quarter windows as well.
        "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

        Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
        Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
        sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

        Comment


        • #5
          While the headliner is out it's a great opportunity to scrape, sand and paint the roof interior. The sound deadener Studebaker glued in there was slightly effective and is probably peeling off in places. You don't want it dropping on to your new headliner the month after you install it.
          I buy a roll of foilbacked insulation from J.C.Whitless and, using 3M spray upholstery adhesive, cover every accessible inch of roof. It really does make the car quiet. The spray adhesive drops a lot of sticky spider webs so be sure to cover any surface you don't want to attack later with cleaning solvents.
          "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

          Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
          Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
          sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

          Comment


          • #6
            This last spring I installed a new headliner in my '64 Daytona HT. I used the shop manual as a guide (a must!!). I had to pull both front and rear windows to install it.
            Actually the headliner was fine, it was the windlace that was ratty, but you have to basically remove the headliner to install all new stuff.It went well, for my first attempt at one; although, I had to loosen the seams and restretch it on a hot day. It turned out well, I learned a lot and would not hesitate to do another!
            Another hint: remove the seats and console, that way one can work comfortably!!

            Comment


            • #7
              Benny,
              I guess we've determined you need to pull some glass. That probably means new rubber for install. If you follow the shop manual removal is not at all difficult. If the existing rubber is hard or brittle, and you've obtained new rubber, you can cut away the inner lip with a sharp box knife. Be sureto clean all the old sealer from around the opening and use fresh dum-dum to reinstall.
              When I went to my auto supply store and asked for dum-dum they sent the manager out to see me. I had to tell them I wanted ribbon caulk.
              "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

              Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
              Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
              sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

              Comment

              Working...
              X