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Aligned fine ,pulls to left

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  • #16
    did you get a 4-wheel alignment vs. a 2 wheel or thrust alignment? a 4 wheel alignment will measure a car for a squared wheelbase, if wheelbase is shorter on one side (mechanical, accident damage) it will tend to pull to that side. also did the shop duplicate the actual drive height with ballast bags for driver (if mostly driver only) and passenger (if passenger rides majority of time)? this is the difference between a flat-rate alignment and a quality alignment, go see how a Mercedes, Porsche, BMW, Ferrari, etc. do theirs.

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    • #17
      No fancy line up shops here in Alabama. But I'll try to get more info from the guy who computer lined it up

      63 R2 Avanti

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      • #18
        <SNIP>
        The tires look new, but their vintage 1981 as well. I need to get tires,
        ....................
        Wow! You sure do! The tires alone could be the source of the pulling. Swap them front to rear, or with another set. It might make all the difference.

        Dwain G.
        "Burning Bridges...Lost Forevermore"......

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        • #19
          Just an update. We took the car to a cruise night yesterday. It was not a fun trip. Not only did I have the pull to the left thing, but a host of other problems. The steering wheel shook on right curves at highway speeds. The back end didn't take bumps and dips evenly. It felt like one side would bounce lower or easier than the other. On sharp "turn arounds" in the parking lot (to the left), there was a "rub rub rub"sound that didnnt sound like the tires. I babied it home last night and this morning put all four ends on jack stands, took the tires off and rolled under. There is oil all over the back end. Apparently the couple of drops of oil I saw under the differencial occassionally was blowing out of the seal like crazy when I drove it. I put nearly a quart of oil in the diff. before it topped out. While I was there I noticed the rear shocks where they mount at the top were positioned curiously. The top of the shock mounts into a bolt that slides through a kind of channel steel. There is about a inch or so that the shock can travel in either direction on the bolt before it hits the frame. Neither shocks are centered nor have they settled in relative positions. Shouldn't there be spacers there?? I also finally found where I am suppose to measure to get the front calipers lined up and they were WAY OUT. Both the center on the rotor and front to back were off up to over 20 thousanths!!I can also confirm that none of the new suspencion parts including the king pins have ever seen grease. Over the next few days, I'm going to grease, space and order a rear seal to install before the wheels go back on. I'm also going to cris cross the tires when they go back on.
          There is also a leak developing in the front main seal on the engine, but that will have to wait. I felt like the years this car was in storage was going to produce problems, I guess I shouldn't be surprised.

          63 R2 Avanti

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          • #20
            Charley: I just came in from looking at my rear shocks and, yes, they appaer to have fairly thin wall spacers between the sides of the channel section cross member and the rubber insulator that the shock mounting bolt passes through. They appear to be not a lot larger in diameter than the bolt itself, but, still, yours could be missing. In my opinion (humble) this is not the source of your problem, but I would want to get it corrected. My firm belief is that there are people out there working on cars (and some of them for a living) who believe that engineers put things on cars for a whim and that it is alright to modify component parts w/o altering the integrity of the vehicle (for instance if a component is held on with three bolts and in replacing it one bolt is snapped off due to rust this "mechanic" says "oh, what the hell, two bolts are enough to hold it"). As regards the above and what "mechanics" often do, I would get the caliper shimming corrected--it mat not be the source of your problem either, but the brake engineer had a darn good reason for wanting those calipers centered and parallel to the rotor, no matter what some highschool dropout may have decided 30 years later. Keep us posted and good luck.
            wagone and Avanti I

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            • #21
              HELP ME!!, it's starting to really pi** me off now. I've got the calipers absolutely perfect, now.Their centered within 5 thousands and front to back is so close, I can't measure the difference. I changed the pinion seal(and looks like it still may be leaking) and greased all the fittings. I cris crossed the tires, so that means that each hub has had three different tires on it. All wheels turn freely and have no end play(meaning the front bearings aren't too loose). I put the back end on jack stands, cranked it up and put it in gear. In final drive at upper rpms, as I bounced the throttle, I heard a faint grinding sound between forward load and decelleration load.
              On the road, it's madness. It pulls as bad to the left as it did before, except the grinding sound is more pronounced when turning sharply to the left now. It also makes a similiar sound(not as bad)when first backing up.
              When putting the yoke back on from changing the pinion seal, I put the nut back where it was before. I did this by counting the exposed threads before I removed it and tightening the nut until it was back in the same spot. That basically took a impact wrench. Did I do this right?
              The only thing I know to do if its' not the rear end is to replace the front bearings that I think are perfectly fine and replacing the steering gear box which I think is perfectly fine.
              I also did something kinda dangerous. When it was on jackstands, motor running and in gear, I put a lenght of two by four under the tire to stop the wheel and put the load on the other wheel. I did this to see if I could scare a bad differential bearing into making itself known. I did this on both sides but it made no noise.Can a differential problem cause the car to pull left? Did I put the yoke on too tight??How do I do it?
              The tires aren't rubbing on anything and I checked the caliper bolts to make sure they were tight. Under this car is nothing but shiney new parts, but when you drive it, it sounds like it's falling apart. I am not a parts swapper kind of guy, but thats where I'm basically at now

              63 R2 Avanti

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              • #22
                If you read page 8 of rear suspension and axle section of the Avanti manual it says. 1. Raise the rear of car. 2. Disconect the propeller shaft. 3. Use universal joint flange holding tool J-6371 and remove the companion flange nut and flat washer. 4. Center punch the companion flange and pinion shaft spline so the origional alignment can be preserved on reassembly.5. Use universal joint flange puller J-2576 and holding tool J-6371 and remove the companion flange. 6. Remove the oil seal and gasket. Instalation 1. Clean pinion bore and remove all burrs. 2.Coat lip of new oil seal with light oil and apply a sealer on the outer edge of seal housing to seal between pinion seal and differential housing.3. Install oil slinger and new gasket. 4. Use pinion shaft oil seal replacer J-2037, drive oil seal into position. 5. Align companion flange and pinion shaft according to marks made during disassembly. Use companion flange and pinion bearing pusher set J-2204, press the flange into position on the splines. 6. Install flat washer and companion flange nut. Torque nut to 140-180 ft. lbs. 7. connect propeller shaft and torque the u bolts to 10-12 ft. lbs. There are a few things that the book dosen't tell you like if the yoke has a grove worn in it you have to use a speedy sleeve or else it will just leak again.

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                • #23
                  In other words, you use a impact wrench. I remember I've done chevys that you had to check the torque that it was set at and retorque the same on installation. On some fords I've done, you basically tighten the heck out of it. This seems to be the case with this one. 180lbs would indicate a maximun torque without risking thread damage.
                  I have an old manual that was water damaged. This was one of the unreadable sections. Other than the tools, I pretty much got the installation right. The oil drop I saw may just be excess oil coming from the seal flange.I do admit the new seal did not come with a gasket and I left the old one out. I've never seen a gasket under a seal and felt the new seal probably compensated for that(new technogy and all)since it didn't come with one. But if it needs one, seals aren't but $3.00.
                  Thanks for the info. So I guess the rear is ok. Now I guess I'm down to wheel bearings and steering gear boxes again

                  63 R2 Avanti

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                  • #24
                    Wagone, thanks for checking your your shocks for the spacers. Really good of you Hope I can return the favor.

                    63 R2 Avanti

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                    • #25
                      Jeff DeWitt
                      http://carolinastudes.net

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                      • #26
                        Your right about the tires, jeff.
                        I didn't notice the rear end shifting on accelleration, but I wasn't really looking for it. I'll take the car out tonight and see.

                        63 R2 Avanti

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