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Super Charged Engine

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  • Super Charged Engine

    I am new to this and learning with your help-- Thank you every one!! The Question I have is I developed a low end bearing knock in my 58 super charged Hawk. I purchased another engine that had been in storage since 1962. It is carbureated and not super charged. It came out of a 1958 Stude President. 289. Is there any difference in the two engines,does the supercharged engine Have "Beefier" crank & bearings,or are they all the same? Will the super charger "Just bolt on" to the engine I purchased? It runs great with only 28,000 miles on it. Thanks again, Frank

  • #2
    Hi Frank, and WELCOME to the SDC forums, glad we got to meet ya!

    You're in luck, Studebaker decided to make All of their engines tough enough so that no further strengthening or modification was necessary to bolt on a supercharger. So, just bolt the components from the old engine on that replacement engine and enjoy!

    Oh! Have I mentioned the we LOVE to see pictures and really appreciate it when a fella keeps us updated on his Studebaker projects?

    Once again, Welcome home, lookin' forward to hearing from you again!



    Sonny
    http://RacingStudebakers.com
    Sonny
    http://RacingStudebakers.com

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    • #3
      Isn't there a compression ratio difference between the SC and on SC engines?

      53commander HDTP
      53 Champion HDTP
      64 Champ long bed V8
      64 GT
      64 Champ long bed V8
      55/53 Studebaker President S/R
      53 Hudson Super Wasp Coupe

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      • #4
        Some V8s of that time used the same heads on supercharged and non-supercharged cars. they were 7.5 to 1 compression ratio. Some non-supercharged cars had 8.0 to 1 ratio heads. I seriously doubt there'd be a problem running those 8 to 1 heads with a blower.[:I]

        Miscreant at large.
        No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

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        • #5
          In 1957, and I believe 1958, the President 289 was 8.3:1 compression ratio and the supercharged 289 was 7.8:1 compression ratio. The main thing is to use the carb. and its box off the supercharged engine. The carb. is jetted differently. Of course there are other things that must be changed, like the water pump housing and oil fill tube. You may want to find out what is actually wrong with your original engine before you make the swap. It may make more sense to repair the original engine. The car will be worth more with the correct, original engine block. Are you sure that you are hearing a "bearing knock'? Many people mistake a cracked flex plate for a bearing noise. That low mileage engine that has been stored for 43 years may need more than the engine now in your car. Have you run the replacement engine (in a car or on a test stand)? Do you have a Golden Hawk or a Packard Hawk. It is relatively easy to change engines in a Golden Hawk by just removing the hood and radiator, but it is very difficult in a Packard Hawk to do it that way (but can be done).
          Gary L.
          Wappinger, NY

          SDC member since 1968
          Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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          • #6
            quote:Originally posted by Kdancy

            Isn't there a compression ratio difference between the SC and on SC engines?

            53commander HDTP
            53 Champion HDTP
            64 Champ long bed V8
            64 GT
            You're right on Kerry, it does have a tad higher compression ratio. I was too focused on the mechanical change-over, I just didn't think about it. But Bob and Gary are right, since his old engine had a lower compression ratio anyway, it wouldn't hurt anything at all. In fact, it would actually help a little bit, he just has to watch the timing the first time he takes it out.

            Thanks for the heads up partner, 100 heads are ALWAYS better than one! [:I]

            Sonny
            http://RacingStudebakers.com
            Sonny
            http://RacingStudebakers.com

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