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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Here's one available From "Canton Racing Product's"
    http://www.accusump.com/acc_products/acc_kits.html

    " I shoved my foot down on the gas pedal, and there i was *Gone*"

    Leave a comment:


  • DEEPNHOCK
    replied
    You learn something new every day...
    Calvin Lowell (Oldcarfart@aol.com) is an Amsoil distributor, and he pointed me out to the AMS-oiler, a pre-oiler......
    Just what we were talking about...
    More info here, and it is available at a Stude friendly price from good ol' Calvin!

    http://intershop.amsoil.com/cgi-bin/...d/Catalog/1495

    Hope the info helps.
    Jeff[8D]




    quote:Originally posted by DEEPNHOCK

    In the HD truck world, there is a gizmo that bolts onto the backside of a 40mt (Delco solenoid mount) starter. It is a small gearoter pump. When the key is turned on it activates te motor, but not the solenoud that engages the starter drive gear (Bendix). This prelubes the oil system. Never have seen one scaled down for passenger cars...yet.

    There is another system out there called 'Accusump'. It is a quart sized hydraulic 'accumulator' that gets charged with engine oil from an operating engine and a solenoid closes it off and saves the pressurized quart of oil. When you turn the key to crank, the solenoid opens and a quart of pressurized oil is injected into the oil gassages. Not very expensive. In most speed shop catalogs.
    Jeff[8D]





    quote:Originally posted by Thunderbucket

    On the subject of lubrication; The damage done to a motor from inadequate lubrication, is for the most part easily avoidable.
    Most of the heat and friction damage done to a motor will be in the first few minutes on startup.
    The best of the best is an Electric auxilary oil pump, these pumps prime the system before starting and can be pressure regulated, they also get the oil to where it is most needed, at the critical start up
    time.
    If you want an engine to outlast any other,,,then consider installing one.
    I only use a single grade oil,,30wt or 40wt in my Motors, I change my filter every second oil change,,and my oil is crystal clean.
    I have never had a failure due to lack of oil, or oil pressure.
    "Things to ponder when your rebuilding your prize posession"


    " I shoved my foot down on the gas pedal, and there i was *Gone*"
    DEEPNHOCK@worldnet.att.net
    '61 Hawk
    '37 Coupe Express
    http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock
    DEEPNHOCK@worldnet.att.net
    '61 Hawk
    '37 Coupe Express
    http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock

    Leave a comment:


  • DEEPNHOCK
    replied
    In the HD truck world, there is a gizmo that bolts onto the backside of a 40mt (Delco solenoid mount) starter. It is a small gearoter pump. When the key is turned on it activates te motor, but not the solenoud that engages the starter drive gear (Bendix). This prelubes the oil system. Never have seen one scaled down for passenger cars...yet.

    There is another system out there called 'Accusump'. It is a quart sized hydraulic 'accumulator' that gets charged with engine oil from an operating engine and a solenoid closes it off and saves the pressurized quart of oil. When you turn the key to crank, the solenoid opens and a quart of pressurized oil is injected into the oil gassages. Not very expensive. In most speed shop catalogs.
    Jeff[8D]





    quote:Originally posted by Thunderbucket

    On the subject of lubrication; The damage done to a motor from inadequate lubrication, is for the most part easily avoidable.
    Most of the heat and friction damage done to a motor will be in the first few minutes on startup.
    The best of the best is an Electric auxilary oil pump, these pumps prime the system before starting and can be pressure regulated, they also get the oil to where it is most needed, at the critical start up
    time.
    If you want an engine to outlast any other,,,then consider installing one.
    I only use a single grade oil,,30wt or 40wt in my Motors, I change my filter every second oil change,,and my oil is crystal clean.
    I have never had a failure due to lack of oil, or oil pressure.
    "Things to ponder when your rebuilding your prize posession"


    " I shoved my foot down on the gas pedal, and there i was *Gone*"
    DEEPNHOCK@worldnet.att.net
    '61 Hawk
    '37 Coupe Express
    http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    My Hawk, with it's mechanical fuel pump, usually takes 4 or 5 attempts at cranking before it starts, if its been a few days. The oil pressure needle usually kicks up during each attempt, so in a round about way, I think I'm getting some lubrication before it starts.

    Hank

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    On the subject of lubrication; The damage done to a motor from inadequate lubrication, is for the most part easily avoidable.
    Most of the heat and friction damage done to a motor will be in the first few minutes on startup.
    The best of the best is an Electric auxilary oil pump, these pumps prime the system before starting and can be pressure regulated, they also get the oil to where it is most needed, at the critical start up
    time.
    If you want an engine to outlast any other,,,then consider installing one.
    I only use a single grade oil,,30wt or 40wt in my Motors, I change my filter every second oil change,,and my oil is crystal clean.
    I have never had a failure due to lack of oil, or oil pressure.
    "Things to ponder when your rebuilding your prize posession"


    " I shoved my foot down on the gas pedal, and there i was *Gone*"

    Leave a comment:


  • Sonny
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by Rekabeduts

    ......... I plan to use Shell Rotella 15W-40.

    Hank
    Don't get much better 'n 'at! [^]

    Sonny
    http://RacingStudebakers.com

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Thanks for the advice. I'll forego the relief valve for now. As the oil, I plan to use Shell Rotella 15W-40. I used 20W-40 last time, but I think it's thicker than necessary and seems a little sluggish when cold (in S. FLA that means 55 degrees F.)

    BTW, I have a friend with a 53 Coupe, that has a full flow 289 out of a 64, and it started knocking. He thought the worst...but it turned out that the spring in the relief valve was not correct, or not set correctly, causing the oil pressure to drop too low. Just working the spring cured the problem. We have a former Stude dealer mechanic in our SDC chapter, who has been a huge help to diagniosing problems. He helped me with my starter, which turned out to be a ground wire problem (my starter was fine).

    Hank

    Leave a comment:


  • Sonny
    replied
    http://RacingStudebakers.com

    Leave a comment:


  • Roscomacaw
    replied
    Rek,

    The way you describe your oil pressure, I seriously doubt there's need to clean that relief valve. It's a bit of a pain to do and with your oil change schedule, I don't think you have to worry about it getting gummed up.

    Miscreant at large.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    What is the best way to get to and clean the oil relief valve on a GT Hawk? I'll be changing my partial flow 289'd oil soon, and I'm really not sure of the last time the relief valve was cleaned, although I think it was about 2 or 3 years ago. My oil pressure starts out at about 75, then drops to 55-60 when warmed up, and about 45 when idling. I don't really know if the oil pressure is any indication of how dirty or clogged it may be. I have had the oil changed about every 1,500 miles, which is about once a year, and am going to do my own oil changes now.

    Thanks.

    Leave a comment:


  • DEEPNHOCK
    replied
    I remember in the good ol' days when the standard procedure was to take the oul pump screen and fill the pickup with gas and light it to burn the sludge off the screen.

    Jeez, the stuff we used to do <lol>...

    I have a 289 in my shop that I modified years ago to filter ALL the oil that went up into the heads and lubed the rocker shafts with filtered oil. All the oil that ran back down into the block was filtered. Pretty easy to do, although the plumbing looked wierd. I put shut off valves and pressure gauges to check what was going on.
    Shimmed the bypass valve... Used to shut off the rocker shafts at the drag strip (keep all the oil downstairs, where it was needed).
    Never hurt the engine, even though I blew an oil filter off once, before I figured out that the valves only needed to be opened a little bit (What a mess <gg&gt. Not as good as a full flow, but a lot better than the OE setup.
    Jeff[8D]





    quote:Originally posted by Mike

    It's temping to install a filter on the inlet of the oil pump, because the plumbing would be simple. But, supposedly, it's a very bad idea to restrict the inlet of the pump in any way. There's some good information on Gene Berg's VW site about full flow systems. He says even the inlet screen can be a problem.
    The bypass system, on Studes, isn't such a bad idea. The return, on a stock setup, provides extra oil to the timing gears, fuel pump, and maybe the crankshaft thrust bearing. There are a few places to pick up oil under pressure; and lines can be small diameter.
    Mike



    DEEPNHOCK@worldnet.att.net
    '61 Hawk
    '37 Coupe Express
    http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock

    Leave a comment:


  • Sonny
    replied
    Get it started Hank. You always want to change oil when the engine is warm.

    Sonny
    http://RacingStudebakers.com

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    The oil needs to be changed anyway, and the car hasn't been started in almost 3 months due to not dealing with that starter issues until now. Should I change the oil before trying to start the car again, or get it started, let it run some, then change it. The oil is really not dirty at all, maybe 1500 miles since the last change, but it's been almost a year now.

    Hank

    Leave a comment:


  • DEEPNHOCK
    replied
    If it has an OE fiber cam gear, I'd run the 15W-40.
    No sense stressing good parts that are comfortable.
    Oh, and CLEAN THE RELIEF VALVE!
    This should be an annual thing on all Stude V8's.
    The AC filter number is a P-3.
    Hope the info helps.
    Jeff[8D]



    quote:Originally posted by Rekabeduts

    I'm on my last FRAM PB50 partial flow oil filter. Any one know where to get those? All Stude Int has any more is some Purolator that are very rusty from sitting in water somewhere.

    Also, I'm using Rotella 15W-40 (in south Florida) rather than the 20W50 I used last. Anyone have an opinion on which is best for a never re-built 289? (15W-40 or 20W-50?)
    DEEPNHOCK@worldnet.att.net
    '61 Hawk
    '37 Coupe Express
    http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock

    Leave a comment:


  • Mike
    replied
    It's temping to install a filter on the inlet of the oil pump, because the plumbing would be simple. But, supposedly, it's a very bad idea to restrict the inlet of the pump in any way. There's some good information on Gene Berg's VW site about full flow systems. He says even the inlet screen can be a problem.
    The bypass system, on Studes, isn't such a bad idea. The return, on a stock setup, provides extra oil to the timing gears, fuel pump, and maybe the crankshaft thrust bearing. There are a few places to pick up oil under pressure; and lines can be small diameter.
    Mike

    Leave a comment:

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