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7" rims?

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  • #31
    If you want to get real precise, take a framing square and another steel rule and clamp them together with C-Clamps to get an EXACT measurement.

    My framing square is just a little tiny bit short to do what you suggest. Keep in mind that the 7" is measured bead-to-bead and the overall width of the wheel is likely close to 8", if not exactly so.

    If you have TWO framing squares, other straightedges, and at least four c-clamps (and possibly a helper) you could get a precise measurement so you'd know exactly how much to subtract off to get a true offset measurement. AFAIR those cop car wheels are pretty close the 3/4" offset, but I didn't measure them that precisely.

    nate
    --
    55 Commander Starlight
    http://members.cox.net/njnagel

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    • #32
      I've got 7" rims from a Ford Ranger with P235/60R15 tires. I used a 1/4" spacer because it was REAL close to the front zerk fitting on the top A arm. They do mess with the speedometer.
      Last edited by bowhawk; 05-24-2010, 05:45 PM.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by N8N View Post
        If you want to get real precise, take a framing square and another steel rule and clamp them together with C-Clamps to get an EXACT measurement.

        My framing square is just a little tiny bit short to do what you suggest. Keep in mind that the 7" is measured bead-to-bead and the overall width of the wheel is likely close to 8", if not exactly so.

        If you have TWO framing squares, other straightedges, and at least four c-clamps (and possibly a helper) you could get a precise measurement so you'd know exactly how much to subtract off to get a true offset measurement. AFAIR those cop car wheels are pretty close the 3/4" offset, but I didn't measure them that precisely.

        nate
        LOL! You're assuming I have framing squares! and a steel rule. and c-clamps!

        I spent 20 minutes looking for ANY straightedge. Finally found an old level, probably 18".

        I SO miss working in the garage, as opposed to looking at projects frozen in time

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        • #34
          Originally posted by bams50 View Post
          OK Art, I just measured. I couldn't find anything for a straight-edge that would fit exactly across the rim edge, so with the tire on it's tough to get it perfect.

          That said, here's what I measured:

          From bolt circle mating surface to outer edge of rim: 3 3/4"

          From bolt circle to outer edge of the pictured tire: 4 1/2"

          Hope this doesn't help you.

          (Actually I do, but lots of people put 'hope this helps' or 'HTIH', which would seem obvious... I just wanted to be different.)

          (HTIH)
          Thanks for the "well-wishes" Bob! I borrowed a Ranger wheel and tire 225/70 R 15 with 6" rim. It fit with 1/16" clearance to fender. The depth (offset) measured 2 1/4", compare to the Stude 1 3/4" wheel. My measurements maybe a little off, but I was looking for comparison. I guess I'd have to get custom steelies made, possibly having to use stock wheel centers. The stock full wheel dics fit OK, but the rim had no inward taper like the Stude's so the disc would probably fly off. The custom made rims may be out of the budget right now......

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          • #35
            When wheel hunting it is always about "backspace". It is the most important measurement.
            And YES it is hard measure if the tire is on the rim. So you should make yourself a simple tool. Take a piece of 1"angle iron and cut it 16" long. Thos will fith perfectly across a 15" rim without touching the rubber. Remember to paint it Red or Yellow so that you don't think it is just another piec of angle iron, and use it for something else or throw it out.
            Keep it in your tool box when going rim hunting. It will do two things for you immediately. One it will ensure that you are really looking at a 15" rim and it will give you an accurate surface to measure backspace.
            Good Roads
            Brian
            PS I drilled a hole in mine and hung it on my tool wall so I always know where it is when I need it!
            Brian Woods
            woodysrods@shaw.ca
            1946 M Series (Shop Truck)

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            • #36
              Also, cut a wooden yardstick at the 16" mark. The two pieces are light, easy to carry and give a self-contained system laying the 16" piece across the rim and the other piece for measuring backspace.
              PackardV8

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              • #37
                If you use wheels from another brand, use the lugnuts from that brand also. They are different than Stude lugnuts.
                Catastrophic failure, crash and burn will result.
                Which brings up a question. Are there lefthand Ford lugnuts available ? Or do you have to convert the Stude bolts to righthand threads ?
                South Lompoc Studebaker

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                • #38
                  I'm late in the game on this thread, but another thought regarding larger tires, my 62 GT is running tires
                  215 70R 15 not the 6:70 15 it came with. 2 things to keep in mind (1) without power steering it becomes a true muscle car especially when stopped (2) If my high school math is still with me, the new tire is approximately 10% + larger in circumference. Consequently your true speed reads slower, to which smokey won't care of your excuse.

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