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  • sparkplugs

    What spark plugs should I use in a supercharged 58 Hawk 289? Not a race car, a driver.

  • #2
    See my web site for numbers, factory recommended Champion H10, but that's not a projected nose plug, projected nose equivalent would be roughly a H18Y, start from there or equivalent plug from another mfgr. and adjust if necessary

    nate

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    • #3
      Why not install what came with car when new???

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      • #4
        I've used the Champion H-14Y plugs in the 57-58 supercharged engines with good results as they are 1 range colder than the stock 289 plugs. If I remember correctly, the new Champion number is 91. Bud

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        • #5
          Gee Laemmie, I wasn't there when the car was new.

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          • #6
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            • #7
              Is a J plug a projected nose?

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              • #8
                Laemmle, check out the interchange page on my web site, there's a little primer at the bottom of the spark plug list on interpreting Champion numbers. In short, the "H" or "J" denotes the reach, or the distance between the seat and the end of the threads. The "Y" or lack of it tells you whether it is a projected nose plug. The number indicates heat range, but here's the annoying bit, an H10 is NOT the same heat range as an H10Y (go figure, that would make too much sense.) "R" as a prefix is a resistor plug, and "C" as a suffix is copper core. (so, for example, a RJ12YC would be an acceptable plug to use in an Avanti, which would have had a J12Y plug from the factory.)

                Bosch uses a similar but different system, NGK does as well although I believe their heat range numbers run backwards to Bosch and Champion, e.g. higher number = colder plug. Autolite numbers are just cryptic, I have to use a cheat sheet for those (saved on my hard drive somewhere.)

                Believe it or not, figuring this exact topic out was what prompted me to start that whole spreadsheet in the first place. There's other interchanges on the web, which would tell you which plugs to buy, but I wanted to understand why I was being told to buy a certain plug number.

                http://www.mre-books.com/sa82/sa82_10.html

                There's a pic about halfway down the page on that link showing the difference between a "standard" (not so much, anymore) and "projected nose" plug (pretty much standard across the board except in applications where there is little clearance between the piston dome and the combustion chamber.)

                nate

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                • #9
                  Remember cold plug in hot (high compression) engines. Hot plugs in cold engines(low compression) Then like others said adjust to make the engine run like you want it to. Check to make sure plugs are the right color after running awhile. (tanish gray used to mean the mixture was about right.

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                  • #10
                    Because the gasoline has changed dramatically in the last 50+ years.
                    Spark plugs are a tuning tool to get the optimum burn in that particular cylinder of that particular engine with that particular fuel at that particular altitude.
                    There is no 'one plug' that does it all.
                    The plug Stude engineers chose was for a new engine of that particular year (and fuel) that would allow them to get through the warranty period without problems.
                    Lose some compression through wear?
                    A spark plug heat range change can help.
                    Burning some oil?
                    A spark plug heat range change can help.
                    Racers 'tune' with plugs all the time.
                    We can too....
                    HTIH
                    Jeff[8D]


                    quote:Originally posted by Laemmle

                    Why not install what came with car when new???


                    http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock
                    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)
                    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                    Jeff


                    Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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                    • #11
                      so....just about any sparkplug will work..just check the burn pattern...? Why I ask is I have both V8 & 6 cyl plugs on the shelf w/o a 6 anymore..Can I use the 6 plugs in an 8 ?

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                      • #12
                        Flathead six plugs are a "J" reach so they will be a little short. OHV sixes use the same plugs as a standard V-8.

                        nate

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