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  • ' 63 Avanti throttle kicker

    Ok, my R1 & 1/2 didn't have one on the sealed Carter AFB Carb and it wouldn't idle properly. I got a new one from SI for $45. Apparently, it's supposed to have a vacuum hose attached to the top. Any idea where that vacuum line is supposed to come from? [?][)][^] Thanks!

    edp/NC
    '63 Avanti
    '66 Commander
    edp/NC
    \'63 Avanti
    \'66 Commander

  • #2
    I run mine from the tee at the back of the manifold on the Lark.

    [IMG=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/55%20Studebaker%20Commander%20Streetrod%20Project/P1010531-1.jpg[/IMG=left]
    [IMG=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/55%20Studebaker%20Commander%20Streetrod%20Project/P1010550-1.jpg[/IMG=left]
    [IMG=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/Ex%20Studebaker%20Plant%20Locomotive/P1000578-1.jpg[/IMG=right]
    [IMG=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/My%201964%20Studebaker%20Commander%20R2/P1010168.jpg[/IMG=right]

    1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
    1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
    1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
    1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

    Comment


    • #3
      If you are talking about the tube at the very top of the carb pointing towards the back on the passenger side that goes to the choke tube on the manifild. However, I believe on an R2 carb they are squeezed shut or at least squeezed to severely restrict air flow so you don't push air out under boost.

      The vacuum source for the throttle kicker is the fitting that feeds the power brake booster and vacuum gage. Yours may have a pipe plug there instead of a hose nipple. Just replace the plug with a pipe thread hose fitting.

      The throttle kicker keeps the car from stalling in hot conditions where fuel may evaporate and cause the car to run overly rich. It won't effect idle quality and only works when vacuum starts to disappear.

      If you can't isolate your idle issue I suggest you look for intake manifold gasket leaks. I've had problems in that area until I switched to fiber gaskets instead of the metal ones. Also the manifold clamps can crack reducing the clamping force. Just a thought.

      ErnieR

      quote:Originally posted by edpjr

      Ok, my R1 & 1/2 didn't have one on the sealed Carter AFB Carb and it wouldn't idle properly. I got a new one from SI for $45. Apparently, it's supposed to have a vacuum hose attached to the top. Any idea where that vacuum line is supposed to come from? [?][)][^] Thanks!

      edp/NC
      '63 Avanti
      '66 Commander


      1988 "Beater" Avanti---R5388 @ Macungie 2006

      Comment


      • #4
        Interesting. When I worked in auto parts back in the 70's we sold these things and they were called dashpots. Cars would not idle properly when they went bad.

        quote:Originally posted by bige

        If you are talking about the tube at the very top of the carb pointing towards the back on the passenger side that goes to the choke tube on the manifild. However, I believe on an R2 carb they are squeezed shut or at least squeezed to severely restrict air flow so you don't push air out under boost.

        The vacuum source for the throttle kicker is the fitting that feeds the power brake booster and vacuum gage. Yours may have a pipe plug there instead of a hose nipple. Just replace the plug with a pipe thread hose fitting.

        The throttle kicker keeps the car from stalling in hot conditions where fuel may evaporate and cause the car to run overly rich. It won't effect idle quality and only works when vacuum starts to disappear.

        If you can't isolate your idle issue I suggest you look for intake manifold gasket leaks. I've had problems in that area until I switched to fiber gaskets instead of the metal ones. Also the manifold clamps can crack reducing the clamping force. Just a thought.

        ErnieR

        quote:Originally posted by edpjr

        Ok, my R1 & 1/2 didn't have one on the sealed Carter AFB Carb and it wouldn't idle properly. I got a new one from SI for $45. Apparently, it's supposed to have a vacuum hose attached to the top. Any idea where that vacuum line is supposed to come from? [?][)][^] Thanks!

        edp/NC
        '63 Avanti
        '66 Commander


        1988 "Beater" Avanti---R5388 @ Macungie 2006
        edp/NC
        '63 Avanti
        '66 Commander
        edp/NC
        \'63 Avanti
        \'66 Commander

        Comment


        • #5
          Funny, I managed auto parts stores for 3 years before I opened my Exxon Station.

          Generally, dashpots simply slow the throttle blades not allowing them to close to quickly. They had no vacuum lines and had no effect on idle quality acting more like the hydraulic arm that keeps a big door from slamming shut.

          The throttle kicker, since it has vacuum to it will create a problem if it leaks causing poor idle. At idle, when it's working properly it does not contact the carb linkage or do anything else but sit there. They are designed to move upon the absence of vacuum, like when the engine is about to stall, pushing the throttle blades open and releasing as soon as the vacuum rises again.

          Lots of people, mistakenly, mis-use the term dashpot applying it to choke pull-offs, electric idle compensators etc.

          [quote]Originally posted by edpjr

          Interesting. When I worked in auto parts back in the 70's we sold these things and they were called dashpots. Cars would not idle properly when they went bad.


          ErnieR


          Comment


          • #6
            yes, the R-series "kicker" is not a proper dashpot but actually a vacuum operated device that raises the idle speed in the absence of vacuum. Basically a "band-aid" to keep the engine running if it tends to stall at idle - when the vacuum drops, the plunger extends and opens the throttle, keeping the engine running.

            I don't have a good picture of it, but I do remember it being connected to that cast iron plumbing tee on the manifold by a small hard line (looks like a brake line) hopefully someone has a good pic of the setup. Since I don't have PB on my car, I just teed it off the line to the dist. vacuum advance on my R1 and connected the vacuum gauge to the hole in the manifold with a single fitting, much cleaner looking that way.

            nate

            --
            55 Commander Starlight
            http://members.cox.net/njnagel
            --
            55 Commander Starlight
            http://members.cox.net/njnagel

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks for all the info and help about the throttle-kicker guys! It will be interesting to see what, if any, difference it makes once we've got it installed. I'll let everybody know cause we intend to install it first thing after the car comes back from the body shop. [8D]

              edp/NC
              '63 Avanti
              '66 Commander
              edp/NC
              \'63 Avanti
              \'66 Commander

              Comment


              • #8
                Are you still moving to NC?

                [quote]quote:Originally posted by bige

                Funny, I managed auto parts stores for 3 years before I opened my Exxon Station.

                Generally, dashpots simply slow the throttle blades not allowing them to close to quickly. They had no vacuum lines and had no effect on idle quality acting more like the hydraulic arm that keeps a big door from slamming shut.

                The throttle kicker, since it has vacuum to it will create a problem if it leaks causing poor idle. At idle, when it's working properly it does not contact the carb linkage or do anything else but sit there. They are designed to move upon the absence of vacuum, like when the engine is about to stall, pushing the throttle blades open and releasing as soon as the vacuum rises again.

                Lots of people, mistakenly, mis-use the term dashpot applying it to choke pull-offs, electric idle compensators etc.

                Originally posted by edpjr

                Interesting. When I worked in auto parts back in the 70's we sold these things and they were called dashpots. Cars would not idle properly when they went bad.


                ErnieR


                edp/NC
                '63 Avanti
                '66 Commander
                edp/NC
                \'63 Avanti
                \'66 Commander

                Comment


                • #9
                  Yes! We will be down for good sometime in April. I missed York becuse they were picking up and dropping off POD containers last Saturday.

                  Hpefu;;y we can meet up once I'm settles in.

                  ernieR

                  [quote]quote:Originally posted by edpjr

                  Are you still moving to NC?

                  quote:Originally posted by bige

                  Funny, I managed auto parts stores for 3 years before I opened my Exxon Station.

                  Generally, dashpots simply slow the throttle blades not allowing them to close to quickly. They had no vacuum lines and had no effect on idle quality acting more like the hydraulic arm that keeps a big door from slamming shut.

                  The throttle kicker, since it has vacuum to it will create a problem if it leaks causing poor idle. At idle, when it's working properly it does not contact the carb linkage or do anything else but sit there. They are designed to move upon the absence of vacuum, like when the engine is about to stall, pushing the throttle blades open and releasing as soon as the vacuum rises again.

                  Lots of people, mistakenly, mis-use the term dashpot applying it to choke pull-offs, electric idle compensators etc.

                  Originally posted by edpjr

                  Interesting. When I worked in auto parts back in the 70's we sold these things and they were called dashpots. Cars would not idle properly when they went bad.


                  ErnieR


                  edp/NC
                  '63 Avanti
                  '66 Commander

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Indeed! I need a friend knowledgeable in Studebaker/Avanti repairs and maintenance. I could probably be a good customer if you still intend to work on cars... Thanks.

                    [quote]quote:Originally posted by bige

                    Yes! We will be down for good sometime in April. I missed York becuse they were picking up and dropping off POD containers last Saturday.

                    Hpefu;;y we can meet up once I'm settles in.

                    ernieR

                    quote:Originally posted by edpjr

                    Are you still moving to NC?

                    quote:Originally posted by bige

                    Funny, I managed auto parts stores for 3 years before I opened my Exxon Station.

                    Generally, dashpots simply slow the throttle blades not allowing them to close to quickly. They had no vacuum lines and had no effect on idle quality acting more like the hydraulic arm that keeps a big door from slamming shut.

                    The throttle kicker, since it has vacuum to it will create a problem if it leaks causing poor idle. At idle, when it's working properly it does not contact the carb linkage or do anything else but sit there. They are designed to move upon the absence of vacuum, like when the engine is about to stall, pushing the throttle blades open and releasing as soon as the vacuum rises again.

                    Lots of people, mistakenly, mis-use the term dashpot applying it to choke pull-offs, electric idle compensators etc.

                    Originally posted by edpjr

                    Interesting. When I worked in auto parts back in the 70's we sold these things and they were called dashpots. Cars would not idle properly when they went bad.


                    ErnieR


                    edp/NC
                    '63 Avanti
                    '66 Commander
                    edp/NC
                    '63 Avanti
                    '66 Commander
                    edp/NC
                    \'63 Avanti
                    \'66 Commander

                    Comment

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