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  • Heat Resistant Coating(s)

    I'm looking for recommendations on the best thing to use on cast iron exhaust manifolds that will resist rusting. Are there some quality paints available or would some other treatment be preferable?? Any thoughts would be appreciated.

  • #2
    POR makes a manifold 'paint' that seems to last two or three years, looks like raw cast iron.

    [img=left]http://www.alink.com/personal/tbredehoft/Avatar1.jpg[/img=left]
    Tom Bredehoft
    '53 Commander Coupe (since 1959)
    '55 President (6H Y6) State Sedan
    ....On the road, again....
    '05 Legacy Ltd Wagon
    All Indiana built cars

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    • #3
      Just a point about spray coatings. Most good paints have directions printed on the can about how to condition the coating at first startup.

      I'm a CASO and use the spray coatings, but if I had my drothers, I have them ceramic coated.

      Bob

      ,

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      • #4
        I used Calyx on my manifolds. It was recommended by a friend of mine in the Corvette club, and it works like a champ. You don't even have to get the manifolds to bare metal - just brush off the loose rust, then work it into the casting with a toothbrush. The heat from your next startup catalyzes it into a hard iron-colored coating. Non-toxic, too!

        http://www.calyxmanifold.com/






        [img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

        Clark in San Diego
        '63 F2/Lark Standard
        http://studeblogger.blogspot.com
        www.studebakersandiego.com

        Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

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        • #5
          Clark

          Wish I had asked the question myself a couple of months back. I'd have tried your suggestion of Calyx.

          A question, How many standard manifolds would you expect a can to cover?

          Thx, Bob

          ,

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          • #6
            This is from the Eastwood website:

            "Calyx Manifold Dressing - Make your exhaust manifolds look like new in a few minutes. Not as durable as our paint on coatings but convenient and easy to apply because there's no disassembly required. Just remove loose rust and rub in thoroughly. Non-toxic and water-soluble. A little goes a long way one container treats 8-10 typical V8 exhaust manifolds. Includes Instructions. Made in USA"

            Ted
            '57 Champion

            If you have the time: http://fiveprime.org/hivemind/Tags/studebaker

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            • #7
              Yeah, 8 - 10 easily! I bought mine direct from Calyx and talked to the owner. He admonished me to use it sparingly and don't cake it on, as a thick coat won't cure right.

              Oh, and the spearmint leaf they use as their logo? It's an ingredient, I think. The stuff smells like a pack of Wrigley's when you're putting it on


              [img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

              Clark in San Diego
              '63 F2/Lark Standard
              http://studeblogger.blogspot.com
              www.studebakersandiego.com

              Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

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              • #8
                I've tried several spray coatings and the Eastwood ceramic stuff as well. Never found one of them that would last more than 6 months or so without rusting. Started sending them out for ceramic coating and that did the trick. I've used these guys several times -- http://www.moorepower.com/
                64 Champ long bed V8
                55/53 Studebaker President S/R
                53 Hudson Super Wasp Coupe

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                • #9
                  Thanks to all you contributors for the advice. The manifolds in question have been sand blasted and the metal is SO clean that you can almost watch it rust from the moisture in the air. I would assume that this would provide a good surface for most anything that's applied. I know that I've used paint on tube headers before but have never been satisfied with the durability. That was a long time ago and I was hoping that there might have been some advancements since then.

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                  • #10
                    Look under "powder coating" and most shops can also do the spray-on heat-cured ceramic. Usually not necessary to ship parts to get them ceramic coated.

                    CASOs should be prepared for wallet shock. The costs for a pair of V8 exhausts is around $125-150.

                    thnx jack vines

                    PackardV8
                    PackardV8

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                    • #11
                      Don't forget to consider manifold paint that's sold by Bill Hirsch. He advertises in Hemmings.
                      Rog

                      '59 Lark VI Regal Hardtop
                      Smithtown,NY
                      Long Island Studebaker Club
                      '59 Lark VI Regal Hardtop
                      Smithtown,NY
                      Recording Secretary, Long Island Studebaker Club

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                      • #12
                        Yes, Hirsch sells good products, ships fast, and stands behind what he sells.

                        Barry'd in Studes
                        Barry'd in Studes

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                        • #13
                          Greetings. In my 35 years of professional restoration work the only thing I've found that works and lasts is genuine ceramic coating. It is sprayed on, is only microns thick, and baked at extremely high temperature. Not all ceramic coatings are created equal. The brush-on ones just don't last. Many of the ones applied in powder coating shops are close, but no cigar. The real McCoy stuff is amazing, reducing underhood temps from radiated heat by 40%. I've seen the real stuff on a cast iron manifold live through glowing red heat (1400 degrees) and return to normal, unfazed.

                          True ceramic is pretty much limited to shades of gray (silver to black), flat to gloss, although some colors are becoming available. I've used it on pistons and combustion chambers, valves, etc. (I did the pistons and combustion chambers of my Packard sraight-8 and the improvement in power was quite noticeable!) It comes as both a heat barrier and heat dispersant (for use with air cooled engines and brake components). I've also used it on exhaust cross-over ports on intake manifolds so the paint will never burn off or discolor.

                          There are several good sources throughout the country that do it. I use RM Finish Line Coatings in Portland, Oregon. He's a pioneer with the stuff. www.finishlinecoatings.com

                          Cheers. Bob in Portland

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                          • #14
                            I used the Eastwood hi-temp coating. It looks fine after 6 months but the car does not get wet or left out.


                            Note that I had the manifold sandblasted before applying.

                            _______________
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                            _______________
                            http://stude.vonadatech.com
                            https://jeepster.vonadatech.com

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                            • #15
                              I used EASTWOOD stainless steel spray paint on my '53 exhaust manifolds. After fastening them to the engine, I ended up having to remove the left one to change an exhaust pipe stud. I ended up using the torch to get the stud out. That manifold was glowing bright red. After getting the old stud out and a new one in, that manifold looked as if I had just painted it. So I know it holds up to the heat... as far as lasting, I can't answer that as it has only been on the car a year, and the engine hasn't got much time on it.

                              duane miller

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