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Frozen engine

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  • Frozen engine

    I am in the process of restoring a 1950 Land Cruiser with the big six engine. The engine crank won't budge. How do I best go about freeing it up. I've put marvel mystery oil in each cylinder, Lubegard Free-Eze, and kerosene (based on the advice of a parts store "expert"), all to no avail. Help!!

  • #2
    There are probably 30 other "home remedies" for freeing a stuck engine. What you are trying sounds as good as any of them to me [^].

    Some stuck engines can't be unstuck (without disassembly and maybe even breaking some parts).

    Give it more time. Try some of the other remedies that surface here.

    If all else fails, someone here can probably find you another big 6.




    Dick Steinkamp
    Bellingham, WA

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    • #3
      How long since it ran? How long has it been "soaking"? Patience may prevail. Also a better leverage point, like a prybar to the ring gear, but only after some patience. And, as Dick said, some may only come apart by coming apart. Then there's the one from the 37 Coupe Express that was a lost cause. We used it to help fill the gap created by a collapsed septic tank.[^]

      Brad Johnson
      Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
      33 Rockne 10
      51 commander Starlight
      53 Commander Starlight
      "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

      Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
      Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
      sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

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      • #4
        If the piston is not aluminum you could try TREACLE. Pour it down the spark plug holes and let it soak for about a week that will disolve the rust. Assuming that rusty rings are the problem and not a frozen bearing or another issue. Neal

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        • #5
          I am doing the same thing you are at this time however I am doing it with a v8 if you have a stick car you could put it in gear and pull it. I would do this after letting it soak for two or three weeks. If the valves are stuck you will bend them. I have made up my mind to rebuild thw motor anyway, I have a 6cly stude as well and I see what it cost to rebuild them. I wish you luck!

          Studebakers forever!
          Studebakers forever!

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          • #6
            I have a 259 V-8 that had 8 stuck pistons. I put the thing on an engine stand and then lined the valley with tin foil. Then, loaded the valley with BBQ briquettes and lit them. 3hrs later, 4 of the pistons came out in one piece. I'll do it again one day soon to finish the job

            Brian K. Curtis

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            • #7
              I believe the 50 sixes had lubrited pistons, which were iron, with some kind of a zinc coating to absorb oil and make them slide better. The coating does wear off and make it iron to iron, after a while. So, you probably have a pretty rigid situation, not to mention the rings.
              There are penetrants that just penetrate and others that help dissolve rust. One is PB Blaster, I think or Seafoam ( NAPA). Might take a while to get it throughly soaked and you do have to exert some force on the crank.
              I never heard of the charcoal idea, but that's what innovators do best... might work...
              64 GT Hawk (K7)
              1970 Avanti (R3)

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              • #8
                There is a preacher whose name is Studebaker. Believe it or not. He takes a stuck engine and fills it to the top with diesel. And marvel in the spark plug holes and lets it set for a while. I've seen a lot engines that he has got loose. If nothing else works you might try it.



                Carl

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                • #9
                  A few years ago I came across someones web page where they really wanted that stuck engine apart. They took the engine apart but pistons were stuck in the bores. So, they built some sort of oven around the block and hung weights off the ends of the connecting rods with the crankshaft removed. Eventually the combination of the weight pulling and the heat swelling the bores was enough to pull out the pistons! I've also heard stories about using wood blocks and large hammers to beat the pistons out.

                  In my own experience I bought a '65 ford from a salvage yard auction some years back. It had been there about 20yrs and the V8 was stuck. I filled the cylinders with cheap automatic trans oil and let it sit about 4 months over the winter. That spring, I got the crank to turn a few degrees and left it for a couple more weeks. I did this a couple times and eventually got it to turn freely. It didn't help the stuck valves tho and some of the push rods bent. I even had it running (badly, but running none the less) later.

                  Jeff in ND

                  '53 Champion Hardtop

                  Jeff in ND

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                  • #10
                    quote:Originally posted by 55Prez

                    There are penetrants that just penetrate and others that help dissolve rust. One is PB Blaster, I think or Seafoam ( NAPA). Might take a while to get it throughly soaked and you do have to exert some force on the crank.
                    Have not tried this on stuck pistons, but I just finished this on an old rusted stuck distributor. Bought some EVAPO-RUST at Auto Zone(local distributor) poured it in a small bucket, put the distributor in overnite and it chelated all the rusted iron particles into solution, rinsed it off with water and there was NO RUST left on the dist!!!! Amazing stuff! I may buy this in 5 Gal buckets.

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                    • #11
                      I've got a 289 here on an engine stand. A fella gave me this engine about 6 or 8 years ago. It was stuck solid!
                      I kept pouring in a bit of auto tranny fliud thru time. Every once in awhile I'd take a wedge a BIG lever-bar between the rear crankshaft bolts and try to turn it. No go, so a little more oil and forget about it for some months. After about 4 years, I put the bar in and yanked at it pretty good. It MOVED!
                      Now it's still sitting on the stand - waiting for a reason to be revived and put back on the road! Maybe I'll put it in an envelope and mail it to Swifster[)]

                      Miscreant adrift in
                      the BerStuda Triangle


                      1957 Transtar 1/2ton
                      1960 Larkvertible V8
                      1958 Provincial wagon
                      1953 Commander coupe

                      No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        So Brian, I hope you cooked a few hamburgers while you had your V8 BBQ grill fired up. I've put dry sleeves in the freezer to ease installation but never heard of cooking the pistons out!

                        I had two stuck pistons in a 232 and had to beat them out with an oak block and sledge hammer. While I applaud the patience some of you folks have, if the pistons are stuck so badly that it takes forever to get them out, I personally think it's a lot of wasted effort. Not getting them out, but to think the rings and pistons will be servicable. I've removed such pistons several times and it's not the aluminum piston that's stuck to the cylinder, it's the corrosion formed by electrolysis that swells the rings tightly against the cylinder wall. I've never been able to salvage the piston because the ring was impossible to remove without causing extensive damage to the ring lands. However, I do like the idea of having a cookout in a Stude block.........

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                        • #13
                          quote:I've also heard stories about using wood blocks and large hammers to beat the pistons out.
                          Done that!
                          "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

                          Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
                          Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
                          sigpic'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée"

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Last year I began restoring a Ford 2N tractor that had sat for years with the head off. All four pistons were stuck solid. I soaked it with diesel fuel for a month and then after none of them would budge I soaked them for another month with PB Blaster. I was able to get them out with the oak sledgehammer method after that. Patience is the key here, don't get in a hurry. The down side was after all of that the block was junk. It had a hole in it hiding behind one of the sleeves. My point is even if you get it apart it might still be junk.
                            1962 Champ

                            51 Commander 4 door

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                            • #15
                              Yup, the phosphoric acid is the active ingredient. I used to buy "oxysolv" sold by Eastwood to derust small parts. Its basically diluted phosphoric acid. A couple years ago I happened to be browsing around the vet and dairy supplies area of a farm store and found gallon jugs of milking machine cleaner concentrate. Its also phosphoric acid with some detergent. Per gallon, much cheaper than the oxysolv and more concentrated too.

                              While it will dissolve rust, it also dissolves the steel too (at a slower rate). I accidentally left some thin washers I was derusting with this stuff overnight and they simply dissappeared! Always pull out the parts and check progress regularily....



                              Jeff in ND

                              '53 Champion Hardtop

                              Jeff in ND

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