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  • Warren Webb
    replied
    F.W.I.W. I've used a Centerforce clutch assembly in my 66 now for over 10 years. To me, its the only way to go for its light pedal & excellent grip. When the time comes for a new clutch in the 63 G.T. a Centerforce will be used.

    60 Lark convertible
    61 Champ
    62 Daytona convertible
    63 G.T. R-2,4 speed
    63 Avanti (2)
    66 Daytona Sport Sedan

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  • jngregory
    replied

    Mike, no I don't think the clutch wear is normal at all. I think it's a combination of things: hundreds of hard shifts, especially downshifting in the speed stages during steep mountain sections; a 3.73 ratio diff on uphill launches - I need the ratio for the top end, but it makes for more wear on uphill starts; all components are hot, including me, almost all the time; and I'm the first to admit my shifting skills could always improve - I find I get fatigued in the day and inevitably start to miss shifts as the day wears on. It's not the clutch adjustment - the engagement and disengagement is as it should be. I think I just plain wear it out.

    Jack, you make a valid point about the cost and I did look into less expensive components. I like saving money as much as the next guy. I just decided that the Centerforce product had a good reputation as a quality item, and was recommended by several forum members. Given what it costs to race these old cars, I decided to spend the extra money for the name-brand product.

    Yes, I'm having the flywheel resurfaced - it's one of Phil Harris' aluminum units.

    As always, thanks for the input. I'll let you know how the Centerforce clutch works out.



    John
    1953 Commander Coupe
    1954 Champion Sedan
    1963 Lark

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  • PackardV8
    replied
    If you've already bought the Centerforce clutch parts, the rest is moot. If you haven't yet bought the parts, FWIW, while Centerforce is one of the best, I've not found hot rod/aftermarket clutches to be absolutely necessary.

    Studebaker bought and installed the most common size clutches and pressure plates. These same units were used in literally millions of other brands of cars and trucks in the '50s-90s.

    Most every city of any size has a truck clutch and brake specialty shop which has several choices in disc facing and pressure plate spring pressure. These shops have always been able to give me a disc and pressure plate which will do what I need done and live under hard use. They also charged me about half the cost of a new Centerforce setup would cost.

    I assume you are going to have your flywheel resurfaced prior to installing a new clutch disc.

    thnx, jack vines

    PackardV8

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  • Dick Steinkamp
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by Mike Van Veghten


    Could be...your method of using the clutch causing rapid wear.
    Could be . John won his class and placed 27th overall in last years la Carrera Panamericana. 3,600 kilometers in 7 days FLAT OUT. I would guess the clutch (and other components) got just a little abuse .

    Keep in mind this is a 56 year old Studebaker powered Studebaker keeping up with (and beating) the highly modified cars [:0].

    Dick Steinkamp
    Bellingham, WA

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  • Mike Van Veghten
    replied
    My first question would be....is your current clutch wear normal ?

    Normal as in do other manual trans. cars have the same clutch wear ?
    Are you using cheap discs/pressure plates ?

    Could be the adjustment or your method of using the clutch causing rapid wear. I doubt that a Centerforce pressure plate and-or disc will increase the life of your clutch appreciably.

    Mike

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  • jngregory
    replied

    No luck in getting a response on the forum, so I called Center Force's tech guy. He confirmed the maximum throwout bearing diameter is 3" for the Center Force clutch assembly. I measured a spare Stude throwout bearing I have and it is in fact 3 1/8". The tech guy says there are two solutions. Put in a smaller diameter throwout bearing (but he can't suggest anything). He says the simple solution is to clip the spring wire that holds the counterweights, remove them from the Center Force clutch assembly, and that'll provide all the clearance necessary. He said you only lose about 10% of the clamping pressure, and for a Stude application it should not make a difference.



    John
    1953 Commander Coupe
    1954 Champion Sedan
    1963 Lark

    Leave a comment:


  • jngregory
    started a topic Question in Center Force Clutch Installation

    Question in Center Force Clutch Installation

    In the Mexican rallies, I've been going through a stock clutch every 7 day race. I'm going to upgrade to the Center Force diaphram clutch (Summit CTF-DF271739 or 271675) recommended by several forum members. I understand the humps in the bellhousing have to be ground flat for clearance, and the resulting holes covered with sheet metal plates. No problem with that.

    What confuses me is the throwout bearing. Some of the forum posts say grind the humps, bolt up and you're good to go. But others seem to have a problem with the throwout bearing. Some talk about a "ticking noise" when the clutch is disengaged, and apparently the problem is that the throwout bearing is a little too big. One post (I think on the Racingstudebakers forum) says the maximum bearing diameter is 3" for the Center Force clutch assembly, and the Stude bearing is actually 3 1/8" (I think)?

    Please enlighten me. Do I need to get a smaller diameter bearing? If so, can someone give me a part number and/or source? Does the candlestick on the front of the tranny need to be machined down (because the internal diameter of the throwout bearing is smaller as well)? I'm running a T-85 OD.

    Thanks

    John
    1953 Commander Coupe
    1954 Champion Sedan
    1963 Lark

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