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  • Old Tire Danger

    I know there have been a number of threads on this over the years but here is a 20/20 segment that some of you may have seen. This hits old car folks fairly hard since many of us put few miles on our cars every year and the tires look great. My Hawk has tires on it from the early 90s that I need to replace, but they look absolutely fine and have less than 20K miles on them!

    http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/video/aged...hazard-4826897

    Dan White
    64 R1 GT
    64 R2 GT
    Dan White
    64 R1 GT
    64 R2 GT
    58 C Cab
    57 Broadmoor (Marvin)

  • #2
    I don't know if there is any science to this but a old man I know has a bunch of old cars parks his cars on cedar boards and puts baby oil on the side walls and claims he has no problems with tires lasting. I don't know if it work but going to try it on my car trailer.

    7G-Q1 49 2R12 10G-F5 56B-D4 56B-F2
    http://ozarktrails.tripod.com/
    Studebaker Diners Club

    Comment


    • #3
      Keeping the tires out of the sun helps as the sun apparently dries out the rubber (just as it does to plastic materials). I suppose it would also help to block up the front and rear of the cars for storage to keep weight off of the tires?


      Autumn at Lake Barget
      In the middle of Minnestudea
      sigpic
      In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

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      • #4
        That might not be a bad idea, but in seeing this segment I would think that tires on the rack, most are inside and have no weight on them at all. This appears to be a slow release of the rubber plastizing agents and other chemicals unique to the tire manufacturing process.

        Dan White
        64 R1 GT
        64 R2 GT
        Dan White
        64 R1 GT
        64 R2 GT
        58 C Cab
        57 Broadmoor (Marvin)

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        • #5
          My 1963 Lark came with Pirelli tires. They looked good, until I saw them on a sunny day. I'll replace them this year when she makes her spring appearance

          Stu K


          '63 Lark Regal, "Miss Rose"

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          • #6
            There's no question that old tires lose their resiliency, and eventually become unsafe. Whether it's ten years, or twenty years, or even five years, depends upon the individual tire design, its storage conditions, and the use to which it's put.

            Think what a windfall it would be for the tire manufacturers if people were obliged by law to discard perfectly good 10 year-old tires, and buy new ones.

            And ABC News is doing what news networks always do: peddle fear. I mean, would anybody watch, if the newscaster came on and said, "Hi folks, nothing happened today, and everything's A-OK"?

            All we need to do is use a little common sense. If you're going to drive your Avanti hard and fast on hot freeways in the summer, make sure you have fresh tires under it. If you do nothing more with your '47 Champion than drive it on city streets to local shows, or trailer it everywhere, 40 year-old tires will be adequate if they show no serious weather-checking.

            Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
            Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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            • #7
              Right on, Gord.


              [img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

              Clark in San Diego
              '63 F2/Lark Standard
              http://studeblogger.blogspot.com
              www.studebakersandiego.com

              Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

              Comment


              • #8
                After hearing about this issue a couple of years ago I began to get a bit uneasy regarding the tires on our classic Mopar, because I last put tires on it in 1997. Last year I put the car up on jacks and removed all four wheels and tires for inspection. I carefully examined both inside and outside sidewalls and the tread (the tires have only about 6500 miles on them). The car has been parked inside 98% of the time since purchasing the tires. The tires look great and I just can't bring myself to go buy a new set. Do I accelerate the car up to 75 or so occasionally? yep(just for testing purposes you understand)[:0]. Maybe I am at risk of something bad happening, but I am weighing the cost of new tires against that risk and for now I'll continue inspecting and driving.

                Dean




                CLEM DESEE MISTY
                Dean




                CLEM

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                • #9
                  I am not sure inspection is going to be good enough. If you watch the video many older tires look great, but ? Maybe it is just scare tactics but I am now more concerned that ever about this issue.

                  Dan White
                  64 R1 GT
                  64 R2 GT
                  Dan White
                  64 R1 GT
                  64 R2 GT
                  58 C Cab
                  57 Broadmoor (Marvin)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I believe that the tires break down internally and visual inspection will not alert you to a potential failure. My cars are kept indoors and the tires look good, but I replace them by ten years. If you don't drive any one car very much, new tire tread lasts a lot longer than the carcass of the tire.

                    Gary L.
                    Wappinger, NY

                    SDC member since 1968
                    Studebaker enthusiast much longer
                    Gary L.
                    Wappinger, NY

                    SDC member since 1968
                    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Having had a tire failure (not serious) and having talked to others that have experienced catastrophic tire failures, the worst cases seem to be related to steel belted radials.

                      They appear to be OK inside and out, but my guess is that the steel belts/wires start cutting the tire apart internally from the start. Radial tires also flex much more.

                      The resulting rubber and steel belts whipping around if it blows will rip a fender right off. Huge damage for fibreglass cars including Avantis and 'Vettes.

                      I fully sympathize with car owners that face the cost to replace low mileage tires that appear to be good.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Steel-belted tires can present a problem, particularly if they have sustained a puncture which has not been properly repaired. Water, and road salt, in those regions where it is used, can enter a puncture, and wick along the surface of the steel belts, causing rust, and ultimately, separation of the rubber layers above and below the belt.

                        This is not just conjecture. And SDC friend from the Calgary area was concerned about this, and sent some tires to the Transport Canada lab for X-ray. He got the X-rays back, and the rust damage was readily visible. I'll have to ask him if I could get copies of the X-rays to scan and post here.

                        Incidentally, this failure mode is uncannily similar to that of the tension bands in Weasel tracks. Weasel tracks consist of metal grouser plates linked together by two (four in later models) "rubber bands" which consist of a number of wraps of light wire rope, embedded along with metal cross-ties in a rubber belt with a flat upper surface upon which the bogie wheels roll. When the rubber becomes sufficiently weather-checked, moisture can seep into the wire rope, and rust it out. When the wire rope loses most of it strength, the track parts under load. And there you sit.

                        The obvious answer, in both cases, is to eliminate the use of mild steel as a reinforcement structure, and use either stainless steel, or some kind of organic fiber in its place.

                        Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
                        Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          When I replace my tires, I am going to donate the used tires to a local museum "for display only." I know they are in need of tires and they really don't need "new" tires. This will happen probably sooner than I want!

                          Carey
                          Packard Hawk

                          Carey
                          Packard Hawk

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I had a tire on my 60 convertble go flat while sitting in the driveway out front. When I went to change it I found the tire had blown apart! Good thing it happened then & not while I was driving! Keeping the weight off during winter storage & covering them so sunlight doesnt hit helps, but in the end age is the factor one cant keep out.

                            60 Lark convertible
                            61 Champ
                            62 Daytona convertible
                            63 G.T. R-2,4 speed
                            63 Avanti (2)
                            66 Daytona Sport Sedan
                            59 Lark wagon, now V-8, H.D. auto!
                            60 Lark convertible V-8 auto
                            61 Champ 1/2 ton 4 speed
                            62 Champ 3/4 ton 5 speed o/drive
                            62 Champ 3/4 ton auto
                            62 Daytona convertible V-8 4 speed & 62 Cruiser, auto.
                            63 G.T. Hawk R-2,4 speed
                            63 Avanti (2) R-1 auto
                            64 Zip Van
                            66 Daytona Sport Sedan(327)V-8 4 speed
                            66 Cruiser V-8 auto

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                            • #15
                              I'm down here in FL, my Dakota I bought new in '03. It had just turned 26k miles last summer. The tires were only down about 1/2 tread depth, but looking closely to the sidewall, small heat cracks were appearing. Just driving around town, I felt OK, but worried about highway driving. So I replaced them, just in case.
                              Now, a month ago, I changed tires on a show Cadillac I built in '92. The tires had way less than 1000 mi. on them. They came APART on the tire changer! Looking down between the tread sypes, the cracks were obvious. Here in FL, there is a lot of UV coming down every day, so the truck tires were getting it all the time. The Caddy has always been garaged. So there must be some truth in changing tires every few years. If in doubt, just replace 'em. At least, you'll feel better about you and your family's safety.

                              Art

                              '59 Lark hardtop w/355 blown sbc, 700R4, 8.8" rear w/ 3.73 gears

                              Dogs are a man's best friend. Just ask my Dachshunds!

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