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  • irishjr
    replied
    Originally posted by MPallock View Post
    Gentlemen:

    Problem solved. Here is what I did. I pulled the drive shafts (both) out of the car. I turned the yoke on the trans to the vertical position and then marked the bottom of it with some whiteout so it could be seen real easy. I then marked the bottom of the slip yoke with whiteout and then matched the two units up as I put it back it the car. This took care of about 95% of the vibration. I then moved the support to differen holes until all the vibration was gone under heavy acceleration. For this car it was hole #4. The book says it should be hole #1 but whats a mother to do?

    Thank You for your suggestions Mark
    I am new to the forum and am resurrecting my '53 Commander Coupe that had not moved since 1989. Everything is good except for the terrible driveshaft vibrations. I replace all motor mounts, u-joints, center carrier bearing, and center rubber mount bushings. I marked the shaft for phasing as I took it apart. When re-assembled, it was TERRIBLE! Could not drive above 30 mph. Took the car to a friends so we could put it on a lift and solve the problem (HA! HA!). Ultimately found that, even though I had marked it, the shafts were out of phase by 90 degrees. (a service bulletin in 1952 solved a problem with vibration on automatics by raising carrier 1/2" and putting shafts 90 degrees out of phase and continued practice from then on!) Changed the phasing and it improved somewhat. Now I started to check the alignment:

    1. Horizontally, engine and pinion are parallel
    2. With car on stands at ride height: engine down at rear 7.5 degrees; front shaft (with carrier in #1 holes) horizontal; rear shaft horizontal; pinion down at front 1 degree.

    The above alignment does not seem right per normal driveshaft practice, but I don't see evidence where it was not that way from the factory.

    I am having the driveshaft balance checked tomorrow.

    If anyone out there can help me, I would appreciate it. I certainly could use a confirmation of the engine/pinion angles from someone with a stock driveline.
    Last edited by irishjr; 03-20-2011, 04:13 AM.

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  • stuuder
    replied
    Originally posted by MPallock View Post
    Gentlemen:

    Problem solved. Here is what I did. I pulled the drive shafts (both) out of the car. I turned the yoke on the trans to the vertical position and then marked the bottom of it with some whiteout so it could be seen real easy. I then marked the bottom of the slip yoke with whiteout and then matched the two units up as I put it back it the car. This took care of about 95% of the vibration. I then moved the support to differen holes until all the vibration was gone under heavy acceleration. For this car it was hole #4. The book says it should be hole #1 but whats a mother to do?

    Thank You for your suggestions Mark
    Problem solved part deux!!!!!!!!!
    Man, I can't thank you enough whomever I should thank , my vibration in my '53 Champion starliner is virtually GONE!!! Rephased the driveshaft to your suggestion or Marks or whever, took her down the road AMAZING!!!! vibration 95% gone, thanks so much for the info again.

    Leave a comment:


  • 55studeman
    replied
    Congrats!!!!
    Thanks for sharing the solution. This was a good example of why the yokes need to be in the correct phase.

    Best Regards,
    Eric West
    "The Speedster Kid"
    Sunny Northern California
    Where the roads don't freeze over and the heat doesn't kill you.
    And an open road is yours to have -only during non-commute rush hours 9am-4pm and 7pm to 7am (Ha, ha, ha)
    55 Speedster "Lemon/Lime" (Beautiful)
    55 President State Sedan (Rusty original, but runs great and reliable)

    Leave a comment:


  • 55studeman
    replied
    Congrats!!!!
    Thanks for sharing the solution. This was a good example of why the yokes need to be in the correct phase.

    Best Regards,
    Eric West
    "The Speedster Kid"
    Sunny Northern California
    Where the roads don't freeze over and the heat doesn't kill you.
    And an open road is yours to have -only during non-commute rush hours 9am-4pm and 7pm to 7am (Ha, ha, ha)
    55 Speedster "Lemon/Lime" (Beautiful)
    55 President State Sedan (Rusty original, but runs great and reliable)

    Leave a comment:


  • MPallock
    replied
    Gentlemen:

    Problem solved. Here is what I did. I pulled the drive shafts (both) out of the car. I turned the yoke on the trans to the vertical position and then marked the bottom of it with some whiteout so it could be seen real easy. I then marked the bottom of the slip yoke with whiteout and then matched the two units up as I put it back it the car. This took care of about 95% of the vibration. I then moved the support to differen holes until all the vibration was gone under heavy acceleration. For this car it was hole #4. The book says it should be hole #1 but whats a mother to do?

    Thank You for your suggestions Mark

    Leave a comment:


  • Dan Timberlake
    replied
    How do these angles look ( measure) on your commander ?
    http://www.airridetalk.com/images/st...int/Angles.gif
    http://www.sadoun.com/Sat/Products/A...rs/Johnson.jpg

    Leave a comment:


  • MPallock
    replied
    OK here is what I did today to try and eliminate the vibration.
    I repositioned the the drive shaft so that the yoke on the trans and the slip yoke on the shaft are alined. This helped some but did not eliminate all of the vibration. I then experimented with moving the support to the different holes and found that number 2 worked better than number 1 but there is still some vibration.

    I am thinking of shock mounting a small video camera under the car to watch happens to the drive shaft under acceleration.

    I may do this in the next day or 2

    Mark

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  • MPallock
    replied
    Good Idea Hank:

    I will do that before I start to remove the drive shafts. Gonna attempt this first thing Sun morning.

    Thanks: Mark

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  • hank63
    replied
    Note - "..when starting from a dead stop there is a vibration/shimmy underneath the center of the car UNTIL the car gets moving ...."
    An out-of-balance driveshaft has to rotate to create vibrations. I'd look at the engine & gearbox mountings, before anything else.
    /H

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  • MPallock
    replied
    I am going to do this, this weekend so I will let you all know how it turns out.

    Mark

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  • MARSHALLR
    replied
    Matt,I am going through the same vibration chase as you,so I am very intersted in your problem.The rear shaft slides all the way out of the spline.Loosen the grease nut completely.You will need to tap the rear shaft to the rear with a soft hammer to get it all the way out.

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  • MPallock
    replied
    OK I think I figured out the phasing of the drive shafts. The yoke on the transmission has to match the slip yoke on the big drive shaft. They currently are out by 45 degrees. I am assuming I can disconnect the the shaft from the rear end pull it out of the slip yoke fitting spin it around till the slip yoke matches the trans. then bolt everything back together. Question, does the main shaft pull all the way out of the slip yoke assembly or just far enough for me to rotate it?

    Thanks for your help in this.

    Mark

    Leave a comment:


  • ROADRACELARK
    replied
    I didn't see you mention wheather this is an automatic transmission or a manual. If it's a manual, check the clutch. How old? Is it in proper adjustment? (according to shop manual specs) "Clutch chatter" is very prevelant in older cars. An engine oil leak can allow oil to find its way inside the bell housing and possibly find its way onto the clutch mechanisim. BTDT, just a thought.

    Dan Miller
    Auburn, GA

    [img=left]http://static.flickr.com/57/228744729_7aff5f0118_m.jpg[/img=left]
    Road Racers turn left AND right.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dwain G.
    replied
    Verify that the shop aligned the slip joint yoke with the transmission yoke, not the differential yoke. Check wheel and tire run out, both laterally and radially. Measure all the u-joint angles and see what you have.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dan Timberlake
    replied
    When a Cardan type u-joint transmits torque while operating at an angle it creates a "secondary couple" . I think of it as the 2 shafts trying to return to a straight line position, with a pulsing motion. More angle, or more torque ( lots of throttle, in a low gear) and more secondary couple results. I don't have the factory specs for the recommended angle of the shafts at the center support bearing, but think shimming the trans, the center support bearing, or diff to make the front and rear d/shafts more in line would help.

    http://www.airridetalk.com/images/st...int/Angles.gif
    Some non-Stude folks have had success moving the center support to make the front shaft inlne with the trans, then angle shim the rear axle for equal angles at the front and rear of the rear d/shaft.
    http://www.rodandcustommagazine.com/...t_support.html

    Did you remove the driveshaft? Did all the u-joints move very freely? I've had tight u-joints in non-Studebakers with 2 piece shafts shudder badly at low speed.

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