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  • Door hinge screws


    What is the best way to remove the screws holding the hinge to the door on a C Cab or Hawk?
    Allen


  • #2
    heat and impact socket....don't kill yourself or the fastener...you may need real heat to bust things loose....

    Comment


    • #3
      Take the door panel off and start soaking the backside of the threads with your penetrating oil of choice now.

      I still haven't got all the screws loose on my '55; I try 'em whenever I think about it. I think about half have been removed and replaced with anti-seize on the threads, but if I *had* to take either one of the doors off, I don't think I could, not easily anyway. I even kludged a #3 Phillips bit onto one of JDP's air powered impact guns, that didn't even budge 'em. The hand impact is usually the tool of choice, but sometimes they're just stubborn and fire is the only way to go.

      nate

      --
      55 Commander Starlight
      http://members.cox.net/njnagel
      --
      55 Commander Starlight
      http://members.cox.net/njnagel

      Comment


      • #4
        I have just dealt with those on my '54 Hardtop. I tried the impact route but that didn't work so I drilled them out with progressily larger drills up to about 1/4"(they are 5/16") and then was able to pop out the remains of the screw without messing up the threads in the body.You can get new screws from Stude Intl.
        35 years ago when I rebuild this the first time I replaced the phillips screws with allen screws thinking they would be easier to get out...don't do that, I have broken a allen socket trying to loosen them and I fear I may have used Grade 8 bolts which will probably not drill out.

        1954 Studebaker Champion Starliner HT
        1925 Studebaker ER Duplex Phaeton Std.Six
        John T. Bonney Lake,WA

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        • #5
          When you do get them out PUT ANTI-SIEZE COMPOUND on them!! don't forget!!! I ended up having to construct new female fasteners for a couple of them on my '53 coupe. NOT FUN!
          By the way... the origionals used "Posidrive" screw heads... Good luck finding a large enough Posidrive screwdriver around now!

          duane miller

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          • #6
            Use anti-sieze on installation for sure. The problem is that the screws are so soft that the heads strip out, but that soft material makes them very easy to drill out which is often necessary
            an a car which has had much outside storage since the threads rust on the back side. They will often break loose, but as the rusted thread comes through they sieze and snap easily due to softness of the material.

            Barry'd in Studes
            Barry'd in Studes

            Comment


            • #7
              The original bolts use a posidrive drive .It is not a Philips head.
              A Philips will slip.
              KD tools used to sell these posidrive bits but they are obsolete now.
              When I am at an old time parts house I all ways look for these.
              These bits fit in their hand impact drivers.
              Remember ,these are reversible ,make sure you have it in the correct direction

              Comment


              • #8
                The original bolts use a posidrive drive .It is not a Philips head.
                A Philips will slip.
                KD tools used to sell these posidrive bits but they are obsolete now.
                When I am at an old time parts house I all ways look for these.
                These bits fit in their hand impact drivers.
                Remember ,these are reversible ,make sure you have it in the correct direction.
                Robert Kapteyn

                Comment


                • #9
                  Yes, even with best science advice above, figure on breaking several.
                  Yes, always install with anti-sieze.
                  Yes, an air or electric impact wrench is needed. LEAN INTO IT HARD.

                  No, socket head screws are not a good replacement.

                  Maybe, think about rebuilding all four hinge pins while you are into it.

                  thnx, jack vines



                  PackardV8
                  PackardV8

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Did this on a 57 Silver Hawk a couple of months ago. Bad news is the screws are a bear to take out and often shear due to soft steel shafts. Good news is they drill out easily.
                    Be careful to save the hole threads because the lower bolts are near impossible to get a nut on from the backside. Ask how i know <G>.
                    After removing the hinge, check the pin. One of mine was sheared off. Got a good replacement from Phil Harris at Fairborn Studebaker.

                    ....Dick
                    The 1950 Champion Starlight
                    Santa Barbara
                    CA

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                    • #11
                      Good news is that the screws are available new from SI. Recent sale bill shows $1.25 each.

                      Jim Caldwell
                      "The view don't change if you ain't the lead dog"
                      http://ozarktrails.tripod.com/

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