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Gluing New Rubber Door Seals (Gaskets)

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  • Gluing New Rubber Door Seals (Gaskets)

    I bought new door seals from Stude Int'l and am now TRYING to glue them in place. Problem is, they won't stick. I'm using 3-M black weatherseal glue. I followed the directions by putting a coat on the metal and a coat on the rubber... letting it dry till "tacky" (whatever that means), pressing it together and still no stick!! I have washed the new rubber in a solution of Dawn Dish Detergent and water, rinsing them and drying them thoroughly! I have even tried to sand the rubber surface lightly with 100 grit sandpaper... Still no luck!! I used the search feature on this forum and found nothing in the way of ideas.

    Has anyone had this problem and what did they do? What should I do? I have installed new rubber seals before in various cars and have never had this problem.



    Laisez le bon temps roulez avec un Studebaker
    Laisez le bon temps roulez avec un Studebaker

  • #2
    I wipe the rubber down with lacquer thinner too. Make sure to clean the body with grease remover too. 3M adhesive remover solvent is also good to clean with. Also, when you apply the glue to the car and the rubber, resist the temptation to smear it around to get it spread evenly. Somehow, doing that will make it not stick. Just apply a bead to both surfaces and don't touch it until its almost dry then press the rubber into place. Also, never even slightly stretch the rubber. Make sure its applied "limp". If under tension, it will lift on the ends. Despite these lessons learned the hard way, I still have troubles with it not sticking and have needed to "inject" alternatives under loose edges. The front seal on the doors is a real bear since the door opening and closing tends to scrub it loose if its at all weak.

    Jeff in ND

    '53 Champion Hardtop

    Jeff in ND

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    • #3
      I am having the same problem with my hood seal. Much of the rubber would rather stick to the hood than to the cowl I glued it to. I will have to try Jeff's hints.

      Nathan

      _______________
      http://stude.vonadatech.com
      _______________
      http://stude.vonadatech.com
      https://jeepster.vonadatech.com

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      • #4
        I agree with Jeff H completely.

        The worst thing you can do IMHO is to use soap and water. Particularily Dawn. It's a strong detergent and if there is any residue it will cause a lack of adhesion as will any plasticizer on the rubber surface.

        The solvent wash and roughening should do the trick. As Jeff said, only use the lacquer thinner on the rubber.

        Good luck

        Bob



        ,

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        • #5
          I use a wire brush on the rubber afer cleaning with laquer thinner. Does a good job...

          Comment


          • #6
            Dish soap and warm water-as recommended by GM to their body shops.


            Oglesby,Il.
            " He's not happy unless there's some piece of $#%& in the driveway to work on"
            Oglesby,Il.

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            • #7
              We did another thread on this same subject earlier, but I've had the same prob as the original poster with the current door seals from SI.

              I've used lacquer thinner, alcohol, reducer, dish soap, sand paper, wire brush...no go. The standard 3M weather strip cement just doesn't stick.

              I just replaced some seals in my '62 Corvair. Wiped them with reducer, applied the glue...good to go. Stuck just like they should

              Has anybody asked SI what process they recommend to get the glue to stick? It's almost like there is silicone in the rubber...not just on the surface.

              Dick Steinkamp
              Bellingham, WA

              Dick Steinkamp
              Bellingham, WA

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              • #8
                I use a commercial degreaser, available at any paint supply house, Not only clean the rubber , but also clean the area where the glue is applied to the car. I use the three m black rubber adhesive, I apply it to the rubber and let it dry, apply it in a circular motion to coat the entire surface but dont overdo it,That is the surface in contact with the car. When dry, I than apply the glue to the car, and than again to the rubber , I dont let it dry completely,just tacky, than press it in place and tape it every few inches and let it dry, carefully remove the tape, and it will work well.
                My most recent purchase is 6 months or so ago from S.I..

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                • #9
                  quote:Originally posted by oltrknut

                  I use a commercial degreaser, available at any paint supply house, Not only clean the rubber , but also clean the area where the glue is applied to the car. I use the three m black rubber adhesive, I apply it to the rubber and let it dry, apply it in a circular motion to coat the entire surface but dont overdo it,That is the surface in contact with the car. When dry, I than apply the glue to the car, and than again to the rubber , I dont let it dry completely,just tacky, than press it in place and tape it every few inches and let it dry, carefully remove the tape, and it will work well.
                  ]
                  This sounds like a good, standard process for installing new rubber seals...but have you done the same with recent door seals from SI?

                  I've used PPG DX330 on them and the glue still didn't stick.



                  Dick Steinkamp
                  Bellingham, WA

                  Dick Steinkamp
                  Bellingham, WA

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                  • #10
                    At the same time I originally posted my question, I called S.I. and asked what to do... Few if any had complained about the problem I encountered, but they did say they would get some rubber seal and try it with an old door to see if they could duplicate the problem. As of this date and time, I have received no reply from S.I. I will call them again tomorrow.

                    But as les cou rouges (the red necks) would say, "this ain't my first rodeo"![)] I have replaced several door, trunk, hood seals before and have never run into this problem. I believe that there may indeed be silicone impregnated into the rubber to act as a release agent in the molding process. But what, if anything can be done?





                    Laisez le bon temps roulez avec un Studebaker
                    Laisez le bon temps roulez avec un Studebaker

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I've had the same problem with SI's rear upper door seals for the Avanti. They just won't stick sufficiently to withstand the wiping action of the door closing. I then found an NOS one for the right side that fit like a glove and adhered well with 3M black adhesive. The left side required shaving which was very difficult with the SI rubber product due to lack of a cellular structure. I finally gave up and sealed the left side with black weatherstripping adhesive backed foam tape. That doesn't look pretty but it has kept the water out for 3 years of road trips. I hope someone comes up with an answer to the problem. I also believe silicone has been used as a plasticizer and/or release agent in the weatherstrip fabrication.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Agree, reproduction rubber trim is NOT the same quality as the OEM, but it's moot because there is no more good stuff. The vendors could do everyone a favor by completing the rubber kit with written instructions and a tube of whatever adhesive they guarantee to stick to their product.

                        It's easy to understand why they can't guarantee the goop will stick to your paint, but the problem is best-quality adhesives won't stick to their rubber. The vendors are getting a deservedly bad rep over this problem. They charge a premium and thus own making it stick.

                        thnx, jack vines

                        PackardV8
                        PackardV8

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                        • #13
                          We were told the problem was mold-release-agent,and solvent would pull more of it out of the porous material.SI rubbers are very porous,maybe that's the problem.. I glued mine in over a year ago,no problem yet.
                          Washed them with dawn soap and water,and glued them on immediately,when they were barely dry.


                          Oglesby,Il.
                          " He's not happy unless there's some piece of $#%& in the driveway to work on"
                          Oglesby,Il.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I still haven't heard anything from S.I. concerning the problem. I have tried everyone's idea on this thread and still no luck!!

                            I'm now thinking about double-sided tape. I'm going to use a test strip and see how it sticks... question is, will the addition of the tape make the seal too thick to allow the doors/trunk to close properly?



                            Laisez le bon temps roulez avec un Studebaker
                            Laisez le bon temps roulez avec un Studebaker

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                            • #15
                              You'll probably get the best bonding by first solvent cleaning, I'd use alcohol, then sanding the surface to be bonded, and then bonding with 3M weatherstrip adhesive, it's pretty good stuff although any good rubber based contact adhesive should work. Don't solvent clean after sanding it, if there's mold releases impregnated in it solvent cleaning after abrading can float up mold releases and recontaminate the bond surface.

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