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  • Why change oil before winter?

    Somebody posted a message with a comment that you should change the oil before winter, why did this person say that ? Anybody want to jump in here?

  • #2
    I am sure that they explained that the moisture & acid in the dirty oil will damage the engine parts, bearings etc. over the long months of non-use, so it is much better to store the engine/vehicle with a fresh non-run or little-run, crankcase of winter weight, quality oil. Also good to use a treatment of Sta-Bil or equivalent in the fuel.




    StudeRich
    StudeRich
    Second Generation Stude Driver,
    Proud '54 Starliner Owner
    SDC Member Since 1967

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    • #3
      StudeRich, what weight oil would be recommended for my 289
      V8 for winter? I've been using Rotella.

      Joe D.

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      • #4
        I,ve been at this for 30+ yrs & if most of U R like me do very little milage per year.With the newer advanced oils it is not neccessary to change oil I believe more than once a year or every 2-3k.Why waste $$$ on special storage oils & such.I have never had a problem with any of the 7 Studebakers I have owned

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        • #5
          FYI.............Castrol has one specific oil for flat tappet equipped cars...........Syntec 20W/50. This is the only oil that contains enough zddp to prevent any damage to the cam/lifters.

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          • #6
            quote:Originally posted by valleyguy

            StudeRich, what weight oil would be recommended for my 289
            V8 for winter? I've been using Rotella. Joe D.
            That depends on which climate you live in, but usually in cold climates you want a 10/30 or 10/40, hotter climates can use a 20/50 and maybe OK for moderate climates. It also depends on the kind of driving or lack of it that your Stude. does.

            The Shell Rotella T used to be a good Diesel Oil to use, but it no longer has enough ZDDP additive and you will only find it in 30 Wt. and 15W-40 or some multi-weight at most places.

            Everyone has their own opinion about these oils so I can only tell you what I would use, Castrol 20W-50 and Valvoline 20W-50 (only in those weights) are good choices and the ZDDPlus additive is also a good option to add to any good oil. [^]

            Warning: do not use lighter than a 10W oil in your Studebaker Engine unless you live in Alaska, you will now find 5W-everything- EVERYWHERE! These are for newer engines only.

            There are many, many forum posts under ZDDP etc, etc. searches, if you want to read our rants, locked topics and forum wars, we are NEVER going there again! [}]

            StudeRich
            StudeRich
            Second Generation Stude Driver,
            Proud '54 Starliner Owner
            SDC Member Since 1967

            Comment


            • #7
              Here's a good method, and why...

              If you don't change your oil, all the moisture in the oil (laden with acids) will settle to the lowest point...
              Lowest point?
              Bottom of the pan...bottom of every rod bearing journal...bottom of every main bearing journal..bottom of oil pump.
              That's where you will see the softer metals affected.
              So....
              End of season..
              Warm up your engine.
              Change the oil and filter.
              Start it up to check the oil pressure and look for filter leaks.
              Shut it down knowing it has the best oil possible, with the least condensation possible.
              HTIH
              Jeff[8D]




              http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock
              HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

              Jeff


              Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



              Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

              Comment


              • #8
                quote:Originally posted by Laemmle

                FYI.............Castrol has one specific oil for flat tappet equipped cars...........Syntec 20W/50. This is the only oil that contains enough zddp to prevent any damage to the cam/lifters.
                Oh..oh I bought a case of Castrol non-Syntec 20W/50 motor oil instead of. Does it had ZDDP additive enough?

                Happy Holiday! Steven

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                • #9
                  quote:Originally posted by 57 Silver Hawk

                  quote:Originally posted by Laemmle

                  FYI.............Castrol has one specific oil for flat tappet equipped cars...........Syntec 20W/50. This is the only oil that contains enough zddp to prevent any damage to the cam/lifters.
                  Oh..oh I bought a case of Castrol non-Syntec 20W/50 motor oil instead of. Does it had ZDDP additive enough?
                  Yes, the government thinks of all 20W50 to be racing oil, and racing oil was exempt of the ZDDP limits. Lighter weight oils that specifically say they are racing oils, such as Brad Penn, will also be exempt.

                  ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  Tom - Mulberry, FL

                  1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2161.27)

                  1964 Studebaker Commander 170-1V, 3-speed w/OD (Cost to Date: $623.67)

                  Tom - Bradenton, FL

                  1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
                  1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I've got 6 Studes and 2 other vintage cars and start them once or twice each season, drive them when roads are clear. It is too much trouble to change the oil every fall, but I do it every two years. Gradually switching them all to Castrol Syntec 20/50. It is expensive, but not that much more than all the other oils, which are all now around 4 dollars per quart. Good oil pressure in all cars which I've had for
                    10 to 60 years.

                    Jack in Montana, below freezing now 3 weeks
                    sigpic
                    Jack, in Montana

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                    • #11
                      Per Castrol, only Syntec 20W50 is formulated with enough zddp for flat tappet engines. And it states this on the rear of the container.

                      Race oil use is assumed to be utilized in engines with roller lifters and will not need the protective effects of zddp.




                      quote:Originally posted by Swifster

                      quote:Originally posted by 57 Silver Hawk

                      quote:Originally posted by Laemmle

                      FYI.............Castrol has one specific oil for flat tappet equipped cars...........Syntec 20W/50. This is the only oil that contains enough zddp to prevent any damage to the cam/lifters.
                      Oh..oh I bought a case of Castrol non-Syntec 20W/50 motor oil instead of. Does it had ZDDP additive enough?
                      Yes, the government thinks of all 20W50 to be racing oil, and racing oil was exempt of the ZDDP limits. Lighter weight oils that specifically say they are racing oils, such as Brad Penn, will also be exempt.

                      ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                      Tom - Mulberry, FL

                      1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2161.27)

                      1964 Studebaker Commander 170-1V, 3-speed w/OD (Cost to Date: $623.67)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I've been driving Studes since the late 60's, and back then they were the cheapest cars available because no one wanted an orphan. Enthusiasts like me would buy them, and those looking for cheap transportation would buy them. The latter group would run them with minimum maintenance only, and that didn't include oil changes. I had acquired many of those cars, and pulled apart many of those engines after sitting idle for years. I never found one that had any evidence of interior degradation. One in particular that I pulled apart was as clean as could be, and the person I bought it from bragged that he hadn't changed the oil as long as he owned the car, which was 30,000 miles. The engine (289)was clean and I ran it in my beater for another 50,000 miles and it was still good. It convinced me that if you run them long enough to be thoroughly warmed up, frequent oil changes are not required. I change mine every spring and have for 40 years...no more frequently than that. And, as someone said, the oils are beter than they were back then. I've got 200,000 miles on my Champ engine, and it still holds good oil pressure and mileage.

                        Fred
                        Fred

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                        • #13
                          I've never seen water/moisture settle at the bottom of anything where oil was involved.I've never heard of having an acid problem in a engine either.As long as you use synthetic oil it won't break down like regular motor anyway.

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                          • #14
                            Man-o-man... I sure have...
                            Depends a lot on your climate, and your driving style.
                            Short runs, non complete warm-ups, hot and cold days...
                            You can get a lot of moisture in the oil...and it will corrode the pistons, and show on the bearings..
                            BTDT
                            Jeff[8D]


                            quote:Originally posted by hopsBB

                            I've never seen water/moisture settle at the bottom of anything where oil was involved.I've never heard of having an acid problem in a engine either.As long as you use synthetic oil it won't break down like regular motor anyway.

                            53Starliner wrote:
                            I had acquired many of those cars, and pulled apart many of those engines after sitting idle for years. I never found one that had any evidence of interior degradation. One in particular that I pulled apart was as clean as could be, and the person I bought it from bragged that he hadn't changed the oil as long as he owned the car, which was 30,000 miles. The engine (289)was clean and I ran it in my beater for another 50,000 miles and it was still good. It convinced me that if you run them long enough to be thoroughly warmed up, frequent oil changes are not required. I change mine every spring and have for 40 years...no more frequently than that.
                            HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                            Jeff


                            Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                            Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              In '90-'91 the company I was working for got a contract to run tests for a oil company. A small fleet of cars was purchased new and after some break-in miles, testing was started. This was fall/winter cold weather testing in MN. The cars were deliberately run on very short trips and not allowed to warm up. Every so many miles, the valve lifters were pulled and one sent in for inspection for wear. I am not sure of all the details since I didn't work on the project myself. I remember at the end of the testing I had to help pull out the temperature probes placed in the oil pan drain plugs. We put new plugs in and removed the ones that had the sensors installed. I always wonder how those cars made out later since they were cleaned up and sold to the public with probably a big discount with low mileage. One other item I recall was about once a week they had to take the cars on about a 10 mile trip to let the engines fully warm up since all those cold starts had filled the crankcases with gas and the oil was overfull!! These cars had EFI (I recall they were '91 olds 88s and ford escorts). A 10 mile trip seemed enough to let the gas evaporate from the oil through the PCV.

                              Cold weather driving with lots of short trips is the worst IMO.

                              Jeff in ND

                              '53 Champion Hardtop

                              Jeff in ND

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