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floor panel and rocker panel replacement

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  • floor panel and rocker panel replacement

    I am in the process of replacing my floor panels with the full floor panels purchased fron classic ent and rocker panels, does anyone have pictures or know how of how they go in as far as front to rear if any metal needs to be cut from the floor panel itself, and how the rocker panel meets up with the floor panel? It is on a 1958 silverhawk 2 dr coupe. I am close but I really want to get it right!

  • #2
    I like your screen name!
    Your question is a good one, and many here have trod the path you are on...
    Hopefully, some will have your specific answer, and even better,,,,they might have pic's![]
    Jeff[8D]
    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

    Jeff


    Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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    • #3
      I'd really have to "see" (pics) what you have to work with to provide more specific help....
      You WILL need to have the door mounted and aligned with the cowl and rear quarter (fenders too- if they are on the car)... in order to install the floors with the correct door opening shape. It's also required for installing the rockers. That's the important part. What the floor "looks" like- is not too important except for the toe-board on the passenger side and from the frame out to the rocker. No one ever sees any of the rest.
      You need some fabrication skills, and hopefully welding experience.
      I do know that the rockers are quite difficult to install straight. The repros are not quite the right shape.. and take some serious work to get aligned.
      I hope you have some good Vice-Grips in many sizes. Some 12" and 16" deep-jawed vice-grips are a MUST-HAVE for floor-work.



      Ray


      Specializing in Studebaker Restoration
      Ray

      www.raylinrestoration.com
      Specializing in Studebaker Restoration

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      • #4
        that picture helps! is that a full classic ent floor pan? and does the outside edge go under the door pillars front and rear?

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        • #5
          Studeman, I would really like to speak to you. I really need your advice! I have all the tools and the skills but lack knowledge of the fit and finish. Can you email me or call me? I have pictures of my project I can send you.

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          • #6
            quote:Originally posted by attastude

            that picture helps! is that a full classic ent floor pan?
            Yes, that is a full-size pan (and it's not wide enough).

            quote:...and does the outside edge go under the door pillars front and rear?
            No, the classic pan is made to span the gap from the hinge-pillar to the lock-pillar. It helps in alignment. If either of your pillars are damaged at the bottom, you will need to fabricate and reinforce them.





            Ray


            Specializing in Studebaker Restoration
            Ray

            www.raylinrestoration.com
            Specializing in Studebaker Restoration

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            • #7
              So, the outer edge of the full floor pan does not go under the hinge pillar or the lock pillar! the extra needs to cut of to meet up with the two pillar perfectly?

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              • #8
                quote:Originally posted by attastude

                So, the outer edge of the full floor pan does not go under the hinge pillar or the lock pillar! the extra needs to cut of to meet up with the two pillar perfectly?
                Well, the Classic Ent. pans will fit between the pillars.... BUT. If you look at the hinge pillar and lock pillar, you'll see a "flap" of sheet-metal that goes ON TOP of the sill. Depending on how much rust YOUR car has in that area- will determine how you'll install the new pan. The only thing you need to worry about- is maintaining the correct distance between the pillars (use the doors as guides), AND not installing the sill too HIGH.

                On the car pictured, those areas were still solid- as was the sill itself. I left 50% (width) of the sill to have something solid to weld to... and maintain my door opening (100% length). It's also a hardtop with sub-floor boxes.. so it's more difficult to install the floor.... but the only C/K photos I have handy.
                I used the door to dictate where I mounted the rockers. I like my rockers about 1/8" HIGHER than original. It tightens the gap at the bottom, and the weatherstrip channel hits the inner door higher. I think it looks better... and the weatherstrip can't block the door drains, or flop out like I see on some original cars.



                Ray


                Specializing in Studebaker Restoration
                Ray

                www.raylinrestoration.com
                Specializing in Studebaker Restoration

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                • #9
                  Very impressed with your work Ray!!! how would you say the overall fit is on that rocker panel? I mean to the other panels? does the rocker panel need any body filler or good as is?

                  Joseph R. Zeiger
                  Joseph R. Zeiger

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                  • #10
                    quote:Originally posted by 63t-cab

                    Very impressed with your work Ray!!! how would you say the overall fit is on that rocker panel? I mean to the other panels? does the rocker panel need any body filler or good as is?
                    Since the rocker isn't an exact copy of the original- it does take some serious finessing. The arch is not enough front-to-back.. to match both the sill and the arch of the door. You have to really push the center up to get a straight and even gap below the door. It's not unusual to tweek it a bit on install. This isn't an issue on a coupe- where you can get to the backside for repair, but you have to be more careful on a hardtop.
                    Length is good, end-cap shape is good.
                    Arch top-to-bottom is correct (matches lower door and quarter), and the lower flange is in the right spot.

                    PROPERLY applied... there's nothing wrong with body-fillers. They get a bad rap from the guys that slap it over rust or bare metal... then let it sit in the weather for 6-months till they get around to priming.

                    Ray


                    Specializing in Studebaker Restoration
                    Ray

                    www.raylinrestoration.com
                    Specializing in Studebaker Restoration

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      quote:You have to really push the center up to get a straight and even gap below the door. It's not unusual to tweek it a bit on install.
                      I found this to be the case on my car. Rockers were bought about 1995-6 or so. I've messed with them several times along with the door alignment attempting to get better fit. The center is too low relative to the ends gap-wise. I've not attempted to actually bend them but settled for "springing" them a bit with the screws I used to attach them. The door sill being straight and the sill being curved means I cannot mate them together without some variable gaps rocket to door sill. I used washers with screws to get there. If I had to do it over again and the car had not already been painted, I'd spend a lot more time on it.

                      Jeff in ND

                      '53 Champion Hardtop

                      Jeff in ND

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