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Rear Wheel Drum Removal

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  • Rear Wheel Drum Removal

    On my 57 Champion the manual refers to a special tool to remove rear drums. Is there a place to get this or can I remove without one? I am in the process of putting new brake lines wheel cylinders and master cylinder on my car.

    All the ilnes are off and new ones are made. I have new Master cylinder and new flex hoses. I think I am doing it properly to make it safe to drive.

    Any suggestions would be helpful.

    Thanks for any advise you can give me.

  • #2
    Some of the vendors have the proper puller, the rear drums need this puller to remove them.

    Comment


    • #3
      Here ya go.

      http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_1...=Y&origin=prod

      There are many simillar.
      A quick hunt into the world of the world wide web will bring them up.

      I bought one VERY simillar but with a different brand name.
      If I had to guess..I'd guess there is one or two manufacturers...and end up being sold under many different brand names.

      Mike

      Comment


      • #4
        The type that Mike mentions are often on E-bay in either new or used condition. I've seen new Chinese made pullers for little money and they may be fine.


        Brent's rootbeer racer.
        MN iron ore...it does your body good.
        sigpic
        In the middle of MinneSTUDEa.

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks guys for your help I will see if I can find one.
          Can you tell me what is so different about the rear drums that I need this tool? Just curious.
          Don

          Comment


          • #6
            Don, As they say..."Back in the day"...the keyed tapered rear axles were common. I think that Chrysler was one of the last to go to flanged rear axles. While you are doing this work...don't forget to lube your rear wheel bearings. The rear bearings in these cars are not lubricated by the differential gear lube and need a shot of grease from time to time. If you have the appropriate manual, it will cover this procedure. Your rear axle housing has a small fitting just behind the backing plate where the axle bearing lives. You need to remove the fitting, install a grease fitting and give it enough grease for the small "weep" hole to extrude a tiny amount of grease. It is good to locate the weep hole and clean it with a paper clip or some other narrow object. If your axle is very dirty, clean it good first in order to locate the fittings and weep hole. As always, please support the car safely while doing these tasks.

            John Clary
            Greer, SC

            Life... is what happens as you are making plans.
            SDC member since 1975
            John Clary
            Greer, SC

            SDC member since 1975

            Comment


            • #7
              I failed to mention that when you complete the wheel bearing lubricating procedure...remove the grease fitting and replace the fitting you took out. The last thing you want is to leave a grease fitting in that area where it could easily be broken off.
              John Clary
              Greer, SC

              SDC member since 1975

              Comment


              • #8
                Wow Sears thinks they are gold you can find them for about $50. Just thought that I would let you know.
                http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/BRAND...motiveQ5fTools

                Mabel 1949 Champion
                Hawk 1957 Silverhawk
                Gus 1958 Transtar
                The Prez 1955 President State
                Blu 1957 Golden Hawk
                Daisy 1954 Regal Commander Starlight Coupe
                Fresno,Ca
                Mabel 1949 Champion
                Hawk 1957 Silverhawk
                Gus 1958 Transtar
                The Prez 1955 President State
                Blu 1957 Golden Hawk
                Daisy 1954 Regal Commander Starlight Coupe
                Fresno,Ca

                Comment


                • #9
                  To add to jclary's excellent advice:
                  Studebaker recommended that axle shaft endplay be adjusted periodically, and there is no better time to do it than when doing your rear brakes. The recommended clearance is .001 to .005 inch. It's common to see them at .020" or more!

                  When I do this, I pull both axles, wash and inspect the bearings, and repack by hand, changing seals if necessary. You need a dial indicator, preferably with a magnetic base, to check endplay, but they are quite cheap to buy now. Even the Chinese ones are satisfactory for occasional use.

                  Somebody here really needs to make a video of this whole operation, and post it on YouTube, and then put a link here.

                  Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
                  Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'd SURE be wary of a tool supposidly made in the US, MINNESOTA PNEUMATIC PRODUCTS....but having a mailing address of KAOHSIUNG TW...!?
                    Come on...this is TAIWAN.. What kinda quality you gonna get with this?

                    The proper heat treatment costs more than 50 bucks.

                    I found one for about 30 bucks less than the Sears offering...but remember..with sears tools, you CAN take them back if they break.

                    Good luck with doing that with an offshore version.
                    Beside...it IS...made off the US shores..!

                    Mike

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Ok...found the top-o-the line puller.
                      OTC is a fairly highly regarded manufacturer in the Auto repair industry.
                      I bought this one, pulled two hubs off my Lark...didn't hardly even put a mark on it.

                      Remember, with tools...you "normally" get what you pay for.

                      http://www.nationaltoolwarehouse.com...qx/product.htm

                      Mike

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The main thing to keep in mind is that you need a hub puller, not a drum puller.

                        Gary L.
                        Wappinger, NY

                        SDC member since 1968
                        Studebaker enthusiast much longer
                        Gary L.
                        Wappinger, NY

                        SDC member since 1968
                        Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          NOTICE... not all of the Stude rear ends are drilled and tapped to install zerks.
                          An old school mechanic friend told me that before re-installing the drums... CLEAN BOTH THE AXLE AND DRUM SURFACES... then take a stick of blackboard chalk and do some scribbling on the axle tapers. This will lube them enough to allow release... but not enough to allow them to be over-tightenrd and split! After following his advice I have noticed that my impact wrench on the puller removes them like a dream.

                          duane miller

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            You guys and girls are great. Thanks for the advice. I asked one of the guys working at the part house making my new lines if he had seen anything like the tool I needed. I printed a picture of the tool listed by sears. He said he did and I could borrow it tomorrow. I thought that was nice of him.

                            I am confused about something. Are you all telling me that when I remove the rear drum I am also removing the rear axle? Remember I am new to Sudebaker.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              No..just the drum/hub.
                              Not the axle.
                              This is why you need the puller. The hub/axle are tapered with a key to radially lock the two together.

                              One thing to note during removal, only loosen the large axle nut by a coupla turns. As long as the puller is still just barley pushing on the axle and not the nut. This way..when the hub breaks loose...it won't shoot out and smack your knuckles...or worse..!

                              Mike

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